National Forum

15 year old needs both hips done.......

(Oldest Posts First)

OK that is it, it is offically, 100% time to shout stop and put an end to this absolute madness. How can it be done?

Pinkie (Wexford) - 14/11/2017 11:57:39    2062245

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Without more information it is difficult to state with any certainty what the full story is here. On the face of it if the young fella has to have both hips done he sounds as if he has an underlying problem of some sort. Either that or there is some very hard hitting going on in Wexford at underage level!

MuckrossHead (Donegal) - 14/11/2017 12:41:49    2062252

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No excuses for over training anymore, all coaches should have the required knowledge to prevent it. However for many it's all about them and their reputations. More long term planning in S&C and less more is better attitude required.

lillyboy (Kildare) - 14/11/2017 12:50:27    2062254

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the problem occurs when youngters are trying to play both codes or club and schools/uni etc and there seems to be little to no communication between the coaches of these different teams. In my own experience, most coaches have a 'my way or the highway' approach. Even within my club the hurling and football managers rarely try to compromise. This means that young fellas have training or matches every day of the week in some cases twice a day. Some sprt of order is needed for this madness!

SaffronDon (Antrim) - 14/11/2017 13:17:57    2062262

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Was watching a few aul lads kicking about a while back in a Reserve game. By the end of the match those who hadn't been taken off for their own health looked like they were about to keel over. On that basis I think we should make the games a lot shorter too. Prob around 15 or 20 minutes a half should be enough at all age groups. Not only will it also help with the burnout issue but It should also reduce the number 40+ year olds who are dying in Ireland per week.

Offside_Rule (Antrim) - 14/11/2017 14:07:00    2062284

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are we now producing a couple of generations of players who will develop more serious health problems in later life. all this s+c to outdo the other side and enhance the reputations of these maverick coaches whose aim is to be in demand as the next big thing, add into the mix all the 3g type pitches and sand mattress ones with no give in the surface

bulmccabe (Tyrone) - 14/11/2017 14:19:36    2062286

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Where does it say this chap was in Wexford? I didn't see that anywhere?

Pinkie (Wexford) - 14/11/2017 14:27:52    2062290

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Personally feel that alot of this is not down to over training, reality is down to kids today not being active enough as kids and hence not strengthening up legs/muscles etc through good old fashioned horseplay and as a result they are not able to deal with the training that is completed.

juicy (Meath) - 14/11/2017 16:49:27    2062330

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as Shakira mentioned, the hips don't lie......

woops (Kerry) - 15/11/2017 10:14:25    2062423

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Replying To Offside_Rule:  "Was watching a few aul lads kicking about a while back in a Reserve game. By the end of the match those who hadn't been taken off for their own health looked like they were about to keel over. On that basis I think we should make the games a lot shorter too. Prob around 15 or 20 minutes a half should be enough at all age groups. Not only will it also help with the burnout issue but It should also reduce the number 40+ year olds who are dying in Ireland per week."
Off side what about the 40 minute warm ups that are going on now? I mean I can't see how the feck that helps and it has seeped in to underage football now as well. In fairness 10/15 mins of stretching and a bit of a kick around would be plenty before any game.

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - 15/11/2017 11:17:31    2062440

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Replying To KingdomBoy1:  "Off side what about the 40 minute warm ups that are going on now? I mean I can't see how the feck that helps and it has seeped in to underage football now as well. In fairness 10/15 mins of stretching and a bit of a kick around would be plenty before any game."
Yeah the warm-up drills have gone to crazy levels. Guys going full pelt in cases going back to the changing room sweating to then have to turn round a few minutes later and go out and play.

Offside_Rule (Antrim) - 15/11/2017 11:33:55    2062445

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Replying To Offside_Rule:  "Yeah the warm-up drills have gone to crazy levels. Guys going full pelt in cases going back to the changing room sweating to then have to turn round a few minutes later and go out and play."
Exactly and then you have 10/15 subs having to go back up in to the stand after bursting them selves for over half an hour.

KingdomBoy1 (Kerry) - 15/11/2017 12:08:54    2062453

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I read this in the paper alright. How could that young fellow be on a county Minor panel when he's only 15? That was outlawed by Congress following on a motion brought by my own club no less.

Moyle (Tipperary) - 15/11/2017 12:16:38    2062455

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Jaysus juicy that's a simplistic very unscientific reason you're giving ! It would be interesting to hear if the young lad had tried rest and a proper rehab programme ! I think there has been an increase in hip surgeries in general throughout the gaa , I think this has to do with the increased amount and type of training being done ! Another reason is the surgery itself has become more popular with surgeons themselves ,I think kids should be taught more about flexibility and core strength rather than generic gym programmes from s&c Coaches ! I was talking to a young guy who has just been called into the county u 21 set up for next year he has come through all the development squads and he has never been shown how to stretch or use a foam roller properly ! Madness https://www.gaelicplayers.com/TabId/86/ArtMID/421/ArticleID/427/Growth-of-Hip-Surgery-in-Ireland.aspx

Leh_it_in (Tipperary) - 15/11/2017 18:54:10    2062544

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Replying To Leh_it_in:  "Jaysus juicy that's a simplistic very unscientific reason you're giving ! It would be interesting to hear if the young lad had tried rest and a proper rehab programme ! I think there has been an increase in hip surgeries in general throughout the gaa , I think this has to do with the increased amount and type of training being done ! Another reason is the surgery itself has become more popular with surgeons themselves ,I think kids should be taught more about flexibility and core strength rather than generic gym programmes from s&c Coaches ! I was talking to a young guy who has just been called into the county u 21 set up for next year he has come through all the development squads and he has never been shown how to stretch or use a foam roller properly ! Madness https://www.gaelicplayers.com/TabId/86/ArtMID/421/ArticleID/427/Growth-of-Hip-Surgery-in-Ireland.aspx"
It is a very unscientific reason but one which I stand by even though Ive no facts to back it up. The type of training and training surfaces play do play a part, but i feel the major issue (compared to previous generations) is the lack of physical movement that the youngsters today. They are more inclined to stay indoors playing playstation etc. or watching TV than going out and having a game of football and even the young professionals are sitting at desks all day. Cian O Sullivan previously came out and said it was only when he taught about when he was getting injured he linked it to when he was sitting for large periods of the day. There is a link between inactivity and injuries even at elite levels. I 100% agree with you regarding stretching etc but by being active you reduce the amount of stretching that needs to be done.

juicy (Meath) - 16/11/2017 09:14:18    2062613

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For what it's worth Juicy I am in agreement with you. No doubt there are some training techniques employed by individual trainers which could be damaging and a contributing factor to injuries in players of all ages and no doubt there has been more pressure for trainers to be doing the 'in thing' and keeping up with the Jones'. However, looking at myself and my generation who I grew up with, you played all codes within GAA (club, school, Uni and County), you played Soccer, lads played Rugby, pulled Tug O'War and all this fitted round growing up and working on a farm which was physical in itself. And when you weren't doing all that and had a bit of free time you got all the mates round and played football out in the field for hours at a time. In fact as I am typing I have memories of our training sessions which involved carrying breeze blocks or tractor tyres up and down slopes and other mad 'drills' like that - the type of thing they'd look at you now if you asked them to do it. All this and I cannot remember lads in my generation having to stop early either due to burn out or injuries or whatever seems to going on nowadays. Like you say, in a lot of cases I think the injuries etc we see aren't down to lads playing too much - it is that they are part of a generation who haven't generally been as active as we would have been - in that back in the day you had no computers, no mobile phones, no internet and only 3 or 4 TV channels which had a limited number of stuff for kids. You were out and about all the time, you relied either on Shanks' mare or the bicycle to get around the locality and in general you weren't Molly-coddled to the same level. What is worrying though is that the answer seems to be reduce the number of games, change the age groups, bring in restrictions around trainings etc when in fact it is the lifestyle of the current younger generation which should be addressed or looked at to see what the correlation between said lifestyle is and the injuries being sustained. The GAA isn't the problem here - society is.

Offside_Rule (Antrim) - 16/11/2017 11:03:22    2062631

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