National Forum

GAA Participation

(Oldest Posts First)

One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan

tirawleybaron (Mayo) - Posts: 1164 - 08/05/2024 04:40:59    2543596

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
I'm sorry but it's an absolute pile of junk.
I have up reading half way through it.
Two things jump out.
Where's all the money going to come from to find these plans and how are active referees supposed to have time to referee games and coach ?
You very obviously never did anything in the GAA.
I know you will return to refute that argument but those ideas are pie in the sky..
Have a great day.

eoinog (Sligo) - Posts: 1798 - 08/05/2024 08:23:48    2543602

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
You've a lot of interesting ideas in there.

I don't agree with them all and would be interested in the specifics and practicalities of some of what you state but they are certainly touching on a lot of areas that the GAA could do better at.

I'd add my own, that the GAA intercounty season is too bloated with too many low value games being played and should have a smaller overall footprint to facilitate more club games.

It's pretty shocking how few important matches the majority of clubs get with access to their county players.

Whammo86 (Antrim) - Posts: 4314 - 08/05/2024 09:12:14    2543606

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
There's a few things missing from that. Most importantly in the part about paid roles there's no mention of 2 skills coaches. Which code, hurling or football, doesn't need one? Presumably the aim of promoting both codes equally in all counties is another point that you had written in the post that the admins removed from your post for some reason?
Paying some players is a big no no, or you might as well go full professional. How do you decide who deserves to get paid and who not. And how will the games fund a fully professional model?
As regards the referee ideas it's hard enough to get enough managers, mentors, and administrators at most clubs as it is. If you stipulate that all these have to be referees and go on refereeing courses first, you will likely end up with no administrators, managers or mentors, or very few.
Likewise the rotation idea. In many clubs, and probably some counties, officers get re elected unopposed for multiple terms purely because noone else wants the job.
And people have to be cajoled into managing underage teams for the same reason.
Centrally administrating funds raised will also potentially disincentivisee lads from fund raising altogether. I've been involved in some fundraising for our club, which consumed a considerable amount of my time, and therefore money being as I'm self employed. If I was told that some of this money would be distributed to other clubs around the country where lads couldn't be bothered to spend that time I'd likely not be as bothered myself.
For all clubs to have 4g training pitches there would have to be a massive amount of extra funding made available. Who will provide this funding? As it is some clubs don't even have a ball wall, which surely is as important a piece of GAA infrastructure, if not more important than a 4g training pitch.
I agree that having some huge clubs with multiple teams can disincentivise some players from sticking with GAA, but in many urban areas if you split clubs how are you going to be able to fund duplication of infrastructure? And how do you decide which players go to which new club in urban areas?

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 12982 - 08/05/2024 09:33:16    2543612

Link

Replying To Whammo86:  "You've a lot of interesting ideas in there.

I don't agree with them all and would be interested in the specifics and practicalities of some of what you state but they are certainly touching on a lot of areas that the GAA could do better at.

I'd add my own, that the GAA intercounty season is too bloated with too many low value games being played and should have a smaller overall footprint to facilitate more club games.

It's pretty shocking how few important matches the majority of clubs get with access to their county players."
Our clubs get minimum 5 hurling championship games and minimum 5 football championship games with their county players but its very hard to do. I agree there are too many intercounty games these days, though I do enjoy them and go to most of them! It's a hard one.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 12982 - 08/05/2024 09:39:56    2543616

Link

Replying To Viking66:  "Our clubs get minimum 5 hurling championship games and minimum 5 football championship games with their county players but its very hard to do. I agree there are too many intercounty games these days, though I do enjoy them and go to most of them! It's a hard one."
Wexford in my opinion have a good model for their championships and they can only just about squeeze them in on time ahead of the Leinster provincial championships. Correct me if I'm wrong, Wexford do have a difficult time then in keeping players engaged in club leagues. As Gaels we are sort of used to this situation of having few big club games but I think an outsider looking in would think it a bit mad to be honest.

Whammo86 (Antrim) - Posts: 4314 - 08/05/2024 10:17:32    2543628

Link

Replying To Whammo86:  "Wexford in my opinion have a good model for their championships and they can only just about squeeze them in on time ahead of the Leinster provincial championships. Correct me if I'm wrong, Wexford do have a difficult time then in keeping players engaged in club leagues. As Gaels we are sort of used to this situation of having few big club games but I think an outsider looking in would think it a bit mad to be honest."
We do. At our club between around 8 and 12 1st team players have been missing for every game so far this League, with lads travelling, studying, working and playing soccer. At the same time this means the lads coming up from minor have had plenty of game time which will stand to them in the future, and keep them interested and not drifting away also.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 12982 - 08/05/2024 10:39:12    2543635

Link

Replying To Viking66:  "There's a few things missing from that. Most importantly in the part about paid roles there's no mention of 2 skills coaches. Which code, hurling or football, doesn't need one? Presumably the aim of promoting both codes equally in all counties is another point that you had written in the post that the admins removed from your post for some reason?
Paying some players is a big no no, or you might as well go full professional. How do you decide who deserves to get paid and who not. And how will the games fund a fully professional model?
As regards the referee ideas it's hard enough to get enough managers, mentors, and administrators at most clubs as it is. If you stipulate that all these have to be referees and go on refereeing courses first, you will likely end up with no administrators, managers or mentors, or very few.
Likewise the rotation idea. In many clubs, and probably some counties, officers get re elected unopposed for multiple terms purely because noone else wants the job.
And people have to be cajoled into managing underage teams for the same reason.
Centrally administrating funds raised will also potentially disincentivisee lads from fund raising altogether. I've been involved in some fundraising for our club, which consumed a considerable amount of my time, and therefore money being as I'm self employed. If I was told that some of this money would be distributed to other clubs around the country where lads couldn't be bothered to spend that time I'd likely not be as bothered myself.
For all clubs to have 4g training pitches there would have to be a massive amount of extra funding made available. Who will provide this funding? As it is some clubs don't even have a ball wall, which surely is as important a piece of GAA infrastructure, if not more important than a 4g training pitch.
I agree that having some huge clubs with multiple teams can disincentivise some players from sticking with GAA, but in many urban areas if you split clubs how are you going to be able to fund duplication of infrastructure? And how do you decide which players go to which new club in urban areas?"
Viking has pointed out some of the many unworkable things in the 'strategic plan' outlined above. I could mention many more, but I simply don't have time right now to write a post long enough to cover them all.

Instead, I'll just echo what eoinog said in the first response - the original poster has very little understanding of what's actually feasible, and must never have been involved in administration or coaching to any great degree himself.

Pikeman96 (Wexford) - Posts: 2327 - 08/05/2024 13:00:30    2543658

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
Agree .. complete gibberish.

PatOLogical (Limerick) - Posts: 1377 - 08/05/2024 13:26:23    2543666

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
Please, the GAA needs to return to its original focus; community and volunteerism. Turning it professional or even semi pro is going to be a disaster. Rural clubs are always going to have issues with numbers, that sometimes works in their favour, nobody wants to let the side down.

MeAlone (Galway) - Posts: 75 - 08/05/2024 14:24:11    2543684

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
Shane you can't multi quote like on other forums...
Amalgamate rural clubs. Why?
How many kids play multiple age groups
Is there not rules against that anyway?

I don't see why large clubs need to be split. If you were to split clubs how would you define large anyway?
Clubs fielding multiple teams in an age group allows more kids play and to play at a level suitable to their ability.

I don't think every coach should be a referee. Just because you coach doesn't mean you will be a good or effective referee.
Managing and coaching teams requires a lot of time and it is far from possible for lot of people to be able to combine reffing and coaching
Officers of clubs often have huge demands put on them and being an active ref on top of that isn't always possible.
Funding and sponsorship can't be all centrally pooled. Not. Realistic.

I don't think you need to twin clubs but simply allow a dual status form of registration where within reason s player can be registered for 2 clubs St the one time. At different levels.

On capital expenditure. That's how government funding from sports capital funding. Clubs far more likely to get funding if they do share with other clubs, other sports and if schools use their facilities.

Every club doesn't need a 4g pitch or training area. Access to one. Maybe

Refers should be reimbursed more but only in combination with the gaa providing far better training and development.

Where do you recommend the money for all these full and part time roles come from

If you limit how long people can stay on committees to the lengths you suggest you hurt clubs instead of improving them so what benefit would your idea brig?

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 3573 - 08/05/2024 17:32:53    2543715

Link

For the trolls who dismiss everything

This is meant to be a discussion forum - to express ideas views. Your great lads to just moan about the GAA and provide no suggestions at all.

To put the post into context

The GAA focus is on intercounty football for 3/5 of the year.
The majority of its spending is on elite players, either intercounty senior, school of excellence and underage intercounty.

Women are not part of the GAA, they have a seperate organisation. No other sport in Ireland is set up that way.

The majority of intercounty managers (and a lot of their staff) are paid for training 1 or 2 teams. These payments are under the table and "off balance sheet". This also happens in clubs.

Rural clubs lose 50-75% of their players after U17/20.
Urban clubs have too many players to even bother trying to develop those that don't stand out at U16.

Most club coaches don't know the rules of the sport they coach.
There are not enough referees to grow participation of the sport.

Any young elite athlete, who wants to make money from sport leaves the GAA to play rugby/soccer/Aussie Rules.

50% of clubs and counties are badly run and badly organised. Bmfor example, Cork/Meath/Kildare/Down/Laois should not be performing at a level below Roscommon/Monaghan/Derry/Donegal.


Quality Hurling is confined to 6-8 counties after 140 years of "promotion".

GAA infrastructure is built in the wrong places. Kerry, Cork, Limerick, Galway and Mayo all have big stadiums that only fill once every 2nd year. They are all out of the way for use as a Neutral venue.

You can't play a game of 7 a side football without a red because the tackle is such a shit show. However, you can play 5 a side soccer/basketball/rugby with no such problems.

For the trolls who responded angrily to a post for discussion - take your head out of the sand. The GAA neds to decide what it wants to be and go all in to be that. What we have now will result in our sports falling behind the better organised ones. It is by fortune that soccer is a basket case in this country, the GAA is lucky John Delaney got the top job in soccer

tirawleybaron (Mayo) - Posts: 1164 - 08/05/2024 17:40:00    2543716

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "For the trolls who dismiss everything

This is meant to be a discussion forum - to express ideas views. Your great lads to just moan about the GAA and provide no suggestions at all.

To put the post into context

The GAA focus is on intercounty football for 3/5 of the year.
The majority of its spending is on elite players, either intercounty senior, school of excellence and underage intercounty.

Women are not part of the GAA, they have a seperate organisation. No other sport in Ireland is set up that way.

The majority of intercounty managers (and a lot of their staff) are paid for training 1 or 2 teams. These payments are under the table and "off balance sheet". This also happens in clubs.

Rural clubs lose 50-75% of their players after U17/20.
Urban clubs have too many players to even bother trying to develop those that don't stand out at U16.

Most club coaches don't know the rules of the sport they coach.
There are not enough referees to grow participation of the sport.

Any young elite athlete, who wants to make money from sport leaves the GAA to play rugby/soccer/Aussie Rules.

50% of clubs and counties are badly run and badly organised. Bmfor example, Cork/Meath/Kildare/Down/Laois should not be performing at a level below Roscommon/Monaghan/Derry/Donegal.


Quality Hurling is confined to 6-8 counties after 140 years of "promotion".

GAA infrastructure is built in the wrong places. Kerry, Cork, Limerick, Galway and Mayo all have big stadiums that only fill once every 2nd year. They are all out of the way for use as a Neutral venue.

You can't play a game of 7 a side football without a red because the tackle is such a shit show. However, you can play 5 a side soccer/basketball/rugby with no such problems.

For the trolls who responded angrily to a post for discussion - take your head out of the sand. The GAA neds to decide what it wants to be and go all in to be that. What we have now will result in our sports falling behind the better organised ones. It is by fortune that soccer is a basket case in this country, the GAA is lucky John Delaney got the top job in soccer"
I didn't respond angrily. I pointed out some flaws in your thinking that you still haven't addressed.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 12982 - 09/05/2024 07:07:16    2543753

Link

@tirawleybaron -

None of us would deny that there are issues within the GAA that need attention.

But the issue with your 'Strategic Plan' is that the vast majority of it is unworkable, unrealistic, and unnecessary.

Pikeman96 (Wexford) - Posts: 2327 - 09/05/2024 08:42:06    2543770

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "For the trolls who dismiss everything

This is meant to be a discussion forum - to express ideas views. Your great lads to just moan about the GAA and provide no suggestions at all.

To put the post into context

The GAA focus is on intercounty football for 3/5 of the year.
The majority of its spending is on elite players, either intercounty senior, school of excellence and underage intercounty.

Women are not part of the GAA, they have a seperate organisation. No other sport in Ireland is set up that way.

The majority of intercounty managers (and a lot of their staff) are paid for training 1 or 2 teams. These payments are under the table and "off balance sheet". This also happens in clubs.

Rural clubs lose 50-75% of their players after U17/20.
Urban clubs have too many players to even bother trying to develop those that don't stand out at U16.

Most club coaches don't know the rules of the sport they coach.
There are not enough referees to grow participation of the sport.

Any young elite athlete, who wants to make money from sport leaves the GAA to play rugby/soccer/Aussie Rules.

50% of clubs and counties are badly run and badly organised. Bmfor example, Cork/Meath/Kildare/Down/Laois should not be performing at a level below Roscommon/Monaghan/Derry/Donegal.


Quality Hurling is confined to 6-8 counties after 140 years of "promotion".

GAA infrastructure is built in the wrong places. Kerry, Cork, Limerick, Galway and Mayo all have big stadiums that only fill once every 2nd year. They are all out of the way for use as a Neutral venue.

You can't play a game of 7 a side football without a red because the tackle is such a shit show. However, you can play 5 a side soccer/basketball/rugby with no such problems.

For the trolls who responded angrily to a post for discussion - take your head out of the sand. The GAA neds to decide what it wants to be and go all in to be that. What we have now will result in our sports falling behind the better organised ones. It is by fortune that soccer is a basket case in this country, the GAA is lucky John Delaney got the top job in soccer"
That post gives us a brilliant insight into your character. If we don't agree with your post we are dismissed as angry trolls. I can't see your new organisation getting off the ground .

eoinog (Sligo) - Posts: 1798 - 09/05/2024 11:28:25    2543806

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
Have you costed this 'strategic' plan? I suspect you haven't because you'd soon discover that most of it is unworkable.

You make some points that should be explored (e.g. bigger clubs allowed to have multiple underage teams in my opinion should be allowed... linkage of coaching to refereeing (the requirement to be an active ref is not workable IMO but certainly anyone who wants to be involved should be mandated to do GAA approved courses)... amalgamations will have to happen sooner rather than later certainly in my own county anyhow).

At the end of the day, the GAA is primarily a community based organisation which is dependent on the giving of time by groups of volunteers. The vast majority of people involved are not paid as we all know. It's hard to see how any further movement towards a semi pro or professional structure would be workable (some counties are already broke) and I still believe that the grassroots would not be in favour of this knowing how difficult it is to keep some clubs going.

Square_B (Leitrim) - Posts: 880 - 09/05/2024 11:39:19    2543808

Link

Replying To Square_B:  "Have you costed this 'strategic' plan? I suspect you haven't because you'd soon discover that most of it is unworkable.

You make some points that should be explored (e.g. bigger clubs allowed to have multiple underage teams in my opinion should be allowed... linkage of coaching to refereeing (the requirement to be an active ref is not workable IMO but certainly anyone who wants to be involved should be mandated to do GAA approved courses)... amalgamations will have to happen sooner rather than later certainly in my own county anyhow).

At the end of the day, the GAA is primarily a community based organisation which is dependent on the giving of time by groups of volunteers. The vast majority of people involved are not paid as we all know. It's hard to see how any further movement towards a semi pro or professional structure would be workable (some counties are already broke) and I still believe that the grassroots would not be in favour of this knowing how difficult it is to keep some clubs going."
Larger clubs already have multiple underage teams down here as it is.

Viking66 (Wexford) - Posts: 12982 - 09/05/2024 13:28:13    2543834

Link

Replying To tirawleybaron:  "One of the key aims of the association is supposed to be lifelong participation in Gaelic Games. Done sustainably, ideally through the club.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/administration

However, it's not working.
Player drop off is still a major problem

The reasons are many but here are some solutions for the GAA to implement to actually improve participation

1. Amalgamation of rural clubs - rural depopulation is real, time to deal with it and ensure every underage club has sufficient players to prevent any kid from having to play outside their age grade to make up the numbers - allowing kids play multiple age grades isn't sustainable for their bodies, so is against the goals of the association
2. Splitting of large clubs - kids lose interest if they don't get a game - large clubs burn through young players and don't care, because they have so many but allowing it happen is against the goals of the association
3. Allowing clubs have multiple underage teams rather than splitting the club - starts eliteism at a young age - increasing drop off as kids never play for the first team, which shouldnt happen if participation is the key focus.
4. Focus on coaching over refereeing - it should be mandatory for any underage coach to have been trained as a referee before training as a coach. You can't train players in how to play if you don't know the rules
5. Promotion of refereeing - anyone who wants to be a "manager" of a team must also be an active referee - which would keep respect for the rules as an ongoing part of the job
6. Anyone who wants to be an officer of a club must so be an active referee - this would keep adminstrators focused on how the sports are actually played
7. Finances - the GAA shouldn't be an "each for themselves" organisation, particularly when it comes to money. All fundraising (and sponsorship) should be centrally organised and maximised. This should be as follows:
a. All sponsors register with central body - were level and type of sponsorship is agreed (transparently)
b. All payments of money are applied for (and approved) centrally
c. All mileage (and coaching) payments are paid from central funds
8. "Twinning of clubs" (and counties)- as players leave rural Ireland for education, travel or work, there should be a scheme where each rural club is formally aligned with urban clubs (across the world) and there is an established connection with the home club. That way a player can hold dual club membership in his/her original club and club where they currently live. That allows the player to play a junior match for their home club, whenever they are home, while also playing junior for their urban club when they don't go home for the weekend.
9. Sharing of resources
a. Coaching - all funding for coaches should be centrally administered (and paid from central funds) - coaching resources should then be allocated based on targetted goals - extra allocation in areas where GAA participation is low but has high potential to increase participation
b. Capital expenditure - funding for improvement of facilities should be based on maximising it's usage across multiple clubs/counties. Eg.
a. Large stadium(and future Airdome) funding should be based on the stadiums ability to be used by multiple counties
b. Club playing pitch funding should focus on optimisation of location of high grade pitches across multiple clubs, balanced with wear and tear
c. Club training pitch funding should be focused on providing 4g facilities to all.
All clubs should have a 4g pitch for training, but spectator facilities (pitches with terracing/stands) should be for multi club use
10. Reimbursement for participation
a. Referees should be reimbursed in accordance with minimum wage (including out of hours/overtime adjustments), this should increase with longevity.
b. Managers (and elite coaches) should be properly paid with a full time option. However, they should be centrally contracted and their time shared across multiple roles/units to maximize their value to the GAA.
c. Players. There should be two types of elite player contracts - part time (use by home country) and full-time (centrally contracted). Centrally contracted players are to enter a draft system, to maximise their impact on the game overall. Each county can have 3 full time and 6 part-time players.
11. Paid roles
a. Each county to have a maximum of 3 full time (CEO, Skills coach and Teams manager) and two part time (treasurer and youth coach) paid positions
b. Each club to have a maximum of two paid part time roles (CEO and Skills coach)
12. Rotation of adminstration roles
a. no one can hold a single role on a committee (or board) for more than one term
b. No one can hold stay on a committee for more than two terms (in two different roles)
c. No one can return to a committee (or board) without a minimum of one term away


That's my strategic plan"
Although, rightfully it's been pointed out that there are flaws and some points are contradictory, there's definitely some great ideas in this which would be hard to implement, but can definitely be worked into the management of clubs and regional boards. Selected points:

1. Amalgamations in rural Ireland - inevitable - we need to prioritise taskforces at Provincial or County level to prepare for this. The tide will turn before we know it in rural Ireland, and we need to ensure that every decision made is in the wider interest of the organisation in each county. Possibly the single most precarious issue in the GAA today, and has the potential to decimate the organisation without careful and sensitive planning.

2 & 3. On principle, agreed, every child who shows up to a match up to U12 should play, and every child from U14 who trains should play. Issue I suppose lies with county by-laws on eligiblity, transfer rules, boundaries etc. You can't make a club field 2 teams in an age group, but it should be encouraged somehow. The mega-clubs in the large towns are probably the biggest culprits in this regard, but you can't have one rule for them and another for the rest. Unfortunately, the mega-clubs will never see the full benefits of retention like smaller clubs. I don't know what fixes this problem. Four Masters in Donegal Town entered a 'Whites' and 'Blues' team in the U17 league last year, and both teams ended up contesting the final which was won by a point! So it is happening to some extent in places. Easy for Four Masters though as their underage boys teams have been completing clean sweeps in all age groups of late. They'll reap the rewards very soon in splitting teams like this.

4 & 5. 100%. All coaches should be referees. It should really go without saying. Everyone benefits.Not saying full-time, or even every week, but if you're managing a U14s side you should be out refereeing a handful of games in the season in tandem. You will be a better coach because of it, and the sport will be better for you giving your time like that. Put it this way, if implemented across the board: You, your team, your sport, and your community would benefit much more from having one less coach present (rotating) at each training session if it means that that coach is out refereeing. It's just that simple. How this is implemented is a diff question, and common sense needs to be applied. Hard to bed that culture in, but it will do so much for continued participation.

6. Useful in many instances, but there's no need. Administration should have the objectives of the organisation at heart at all times, but don't see this helping. Again, the good administrators are already or have already been referees.

7. Credit to the idea of a centrally-housed sponsorship registration. All sponsorship should be transparent, but it isn't in many cases. Would be wary of going any further when it comes to centralizing finances.

8. Twinning of clubs is an interesting idea, but unlikely to be facilitated by the GAA. Informal arrangements between clubs could be formalised though. GAA rules should encourage players to do whatever they need to grow as an individual, whether that be emigrating, going to college, or even just taking time away. Harder for small clubs, and ladies clubs to come to these arrangements currently. Plenty ladies clubs in Donegal could do with links to Dublin/Galway clubs to ensure their college students are getting looked after, but can't just be a one-way street!

Have nothing to say about further points, don't think this is the forum for them.

SurelyToGod (Donegal) - Posts: 420 - 09/05/2024 15:15:24    2543853

Link