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Anti GAA Agenda

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You can't just turn up and become Irish by living in the country for a year or two. Rugby is a tiny sport compared to GAA so the amount of coverage it receives is disproportionate.
Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 174 - 21/11/2020 18:16:40
It isnt a year or two and the time frame is longer now and many of those picked have to wait lot longer than the actual time frame allowed to actually make the squads

Rugby is a professional sport and teams train more, play more, the media have far more access to players so of course there will be more media coverage of the sports

This whole thread is a cluster f**k.

The GAA is the most popular sport and gets the most attention, and the most support.

Rugby and Soccer will always get some attention as there is a national team.

skirge7 (UK) - Posts: 41 - 21/11/2020 18:47:49
And that rugby and soccer have professional teams and they train and play more so there will always be more media coverage as a result

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 1878 - 21/11/2020 19:06:02    2312143

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Replying To KillingFields:  "You can't just turn up and become Irish by living in the country for a year or two. Rugby is a tiny sport compared to GAA so the amount of coverage it receives is disproportionate.
Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 174 - 21/11/2020 18:16:40
It isnt a year or two and the time frame is longer now and many of those picked have to wait lot longer than the actual time frame allowed to actually make the squads

Rugby is a professional sport and teams train more, play more, the media have far more access to players so of course there will be more media coverage of the sports

This whole thread is a cluster f**k.

The GAA is the most popular sport and gets the most attention, and the most support.

Rugby and Soccer will always get some attention as there is a national team.

skirge7 (UK) - Posts: 41 - 21/11/2020 18:47:49
And that rugby and soccer have professional teams and they train and play more so there will always be more media coverage as a result"
CJ Stander can't call himself an Irishman if he's returning home to South Africa every chance he gets. I assume you'll still be calling him Irish when he's retired and living there.

Rolo2010 (Donegal) - Posts: 259 - 21/11/2020 19:24:56    2312156

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Replying To KillingFields:  "
Replying To TheFlaker:  "[quote=KillingFields:  "Awaiting your response to the previous post about the percentage of qualified players in the squad today?
TheFlaker (Mayo) - Posts: 6870 - 21/11/2020 11:35:32
It isnt 7 or 8.
Players qualified on residency is 5 today"
I believe there are 7 players not born in Ireland involved in the squad. That's almost a third and that is what the poster is referring to. But you knew that already. I am not getting into a slinging match as I love rugby but your holier than thou approach to all things rugby invites people to slag it off."
And of those 7 players 2 have irish parents so putting them in the same category as players who have no irish parents and qualify solely by residency is nonsensical.
Theyre not near the same and you know that. Give over talking about holier than thou approach considering how you post."]Which 2 players have Irish Parents??
Finlay Bealhams parents grew up in Australia
Billy Burns parents grew up in England
Rob Herrings parents grew up the South Africa

The other 5 Aki, Lowe, Gibson-Park, Roux, Stander had zero links before the IRFU asked them to play. CJ Standers father even said he had never heard of Ireland before the IRFU contacted his son CJ.

That is 8/24 or 1/3 of the Irish team

brisbane (Galway) - Posts: 501 - 22/11/2020 08:57:25    2312500

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Which 2 players have Irish Parents??
Finlay Bealhams parents grew up in Australia
Billy Burns parents grew up in England
Rob Herrings parents grew up the South Africa

The other 5 Aki, Lowe, Gibson-Park, Roux, Stander had zero links before the IRFU asked them to play. CJ Standers father even said he had never heard of Ireland before the IRFU contacted his son CJ.

That is 8/24 or 1/3 of the Irish team
brisbane (Galway) - Posts: 485 - 22/11/2020 08:57:25
Sorry grandparents in the case of Bealham, Burns and Herring.
People who qualify through heritage are not in anyway comparable to those who qualify on residency.
This is running very close to xenophobia

KillingFields (Limerick) - Posts: 1878 - 22/11/2020 11:36:31    2312604

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Replying To arock:  "We in the GAA have got to be careful too with our own prejudices, the nationality rules and laws of Athletics and Rugby for example are different to say soccer. We had a situation where Turkey got gold by an athlete who never lived in Turkey. Jones (a welsh name) the English coach calling Ireland with tongue firmly in his cheek The United Nations is hardly on strong ground when his team could be called the British Commonwealth. That is the nature of Rugby's rules so leave them too it. Are they Irish? They are a team representing Ireland. In rowing, basketball, soccer and athletics are people representing Ireland if they qualify they deserve our support. Even in soccer this week we have a member of Irish Soccer management having "issues" with some 1916 references used by Kenny in team talk, well they shouldn't be involved with the national team simple. And for me the GAA in Cork were vindicated in the Miller episode. People look for the GAA facilities when it suits otherwise they despise us. As for an Anti-GAA agenda I think that is lessening. GAA has its own internal snobbery and prejudices to address mostly directed from the armchair but that is something else altogether."
Id say there's alot of people in the general population of Ireland who disagree with 1916 being brought up before a soccer match. And its a biased narrative. There wouldn't be any mention in the video or speech given by Kenny that most of the Protestant population would have disagreed with everything about 1916 and the majority or Catholics aswell. It was political.
The Irish rugby team are good ambassadors for Ireland. They are the only serious professional outfit we have and they represent the whole Island. Imagine Andy Farrell playing the same video Kenny did before an Irish game..

bloodyban (Limerick) - Posts: 1361 - 22/11/2020 12:49:36    2312647

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Remember when FAI boys Stephen Kenny and Damien Duff called the GAA a bunch of Dinosaurs ?
Remember how the FAI are indebted to Mike Ashley and pay him 100k a month ?
Mike Ashley is sponsoring Cork GAA at a cost of 2 Million.

Well done to Cork GAA. Not bad for a bunch of Dinosaurs lol

brisbane (Galway) - Posts: 501 - 03/01/2021 14:10:39    2325861

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Replying To brisbane:  "Remember when FAI boys Stephen Kenny and Damien Duff called the GAA a bunch of Dinosaurs ?
Remember how the FAI are indebted to Mike Ashley and pay him 100k a month ?
Mike Ashley is sponsoring Cork GAA at a cost of 2 Million.

Well done to Cork GAA. Not bad for a bunch of Dinosaurs lol"
Saw that fair play to Cork looks a tasty deal, with the bonus structure built in.

TheUsername (Dublin) - Posts: 3847 - 03/01/2021 14:53:26    2325864

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Well done Cork. 400 grand a year for 5 years plus bonuses.

CiarraiMick (Dublin) - Posts: 1124 - 03/01/2021 15:16:02    2325869

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Replying To bloodyban:  "Id say there's alot of people in the general population of Ireland who disagree with 1916 being brought up before a soccer match. And its a biased narrative. There wouldn't be any mention in the video or speech given by Kenny that most of the Protestant population would have disagreed with everything about 1916 and the majority or Catholics aswell. It was political.
The Irish rugby team are good ambassadors for Ireland. They are the only serious professional outfit we have and they represent the whole Island. Imagine Andy Farrell playing the same video Kenny did before an Irish game.."
Indeed, most Irish people at the time profoundly disagreed with setting up their own country; albeit most of that tendency now prefer to gloss over their ancestors' craven attitude at the time.

In any event, apart from James McClean, unless it was on TikTok, 1916 and all that would mean very little to many young Irish people nowadays lol

essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 841 - 04/01/2021 09:53:12    2325909

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Couple of days ago, an academic, writing in the Irish Times, went on a bizarre and fact-free rant about "misogyny" in "the GAA"; and how "the GAA" treated women appallingly etc.

This article was publicised primarily on the front page of the paper.

The writer could, with some justification, have stated that women's participation in sport overall is still not all it could be; and that there are still too many people with dated attitudes.

There was of course a shocking flaw in her article - the writer was completely unaware that the GAA is not responsible for women's Gaelic football, or for camogie.So her attack on the GAA was a bizarre attack on the wrong organisation.

(It would make perfect sense to have both women's and men's football organised by the same body; but it's the LGFA which has so far refused to consider a merger. The GAA has tried to being them into the GAA tent, so that they could
have the exact same facilities and support that male players get, but the LGFA recently told the GAA to get lost.)

It was disappointing that an academic person, otherwise used to doing research and getting the facts before committing anything to print, could be so blinded by prejudice that they would write and proof-read a lengthy article without having the faintest idea about the very basics of the organisation they're attacking.

And it certainly speaks volumes for Ireland's middle-class bigotry that nobody in the Irish Times realised the central flaw in her article either. What next - an article attacking the Automobile Association for the poor quality of their lifeboats?

Still, in middle-class suburban Ireland, a bit of GAA-bashing can be socially advantageous - it's a virtue-signalling dog whistle that the person doing the bashing is neither a culchie nor a nationalist; both attributes always a plus at the right sort of pre-covid dinner parties.

I doubt very much if such an error-filled screeed about any other sport would have passed sub-editorial scrutiny. A nonsensical article; but they couldn't wait to get it printed.

essmac (Tyrone) - Posts: 841 - 04/01/2021 10:09:12    2325912

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Replying To essmac:  "Couple of days ago, an academic, writing in the Irish Times, went on a bizarre and fact-free rant about "misogyny" in "the GAA"; and how "the GAA" treated women appallingly etc.

This article was publicised primarily on the front page of the paper.

The writer could, with some justification, have stated that women's participation in sport overall is still not all it could be; and that there are still too many people with dated attitudes.

There was of course a shocking flaw in her article - the writer was completely unaware that the GAA is not responsible for women's Gaelic football, or for camogie.So her attack on the GAA was a bizarre attack on the wrong organisation.

(It would make perfect sense to have both women's and men's football organised by the same body; but it's the LGFA which has so far refused to consider a merger. The GAA has tried to being them into the GAA tent, so that they could
have the exact same facilities and support that male players get, but the LGFA recently told the GAA to get lost.)

It was disappointing that an academic person, otherwise used to doing research and getting the facts before committing anything to print, could be so blinded by prejudice that they would write and proof-read a lengthy article without having the faintest idea about the very basics of the organisation they're attacking.

And it certainly speaks volumes for Ireland's middle-class bigotry that nobody in the Irish Times realised the central flaw in her article either. What next - an article attacking the Automobile Association for the poor quality of their lifeboats?

Still, in middle-class suburban Ireland, a bit of GAA-bashing can be socially advantageous - it's a virtue-signalling dog whistle that the person doing the bashing is neither a culchie nor a nationalist; both attributes always a plus at the right sort of pre-covid dinner parties.

I doubt very much if such an error-filled screeed about any other sport would have passed sub-editorial scrutiny. A nonsensical article; but they couldn't wait to get it printed."
It matters not a lot how educated someone is,, who they work for or what class system they belong to,, almost everyone speaks and opines from emotion.

Most of these columnists probably dont do much proper research (except into aspects of the debate that support their point of view) before they spout off.

But you'll still have idiots who believe that if someone works for a newspaper and speaks articulately they must be right.

Galway9801 (Galway) - Posts: 172 - 04/01/2021 11:40:28    2325922

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Replying To essmac:  "Couple of days ago, an academic, writing in the Irish Times, went on a bizarre and fact-free rant about "misogyny" in "the GAA"; and how "the GAA" treated women appallingly etc.

This article was publicised primarily on the front page of the paper.

The writer could, with some justification, have stated that women's participation in sport overall is still not all it could be; and that there are still too many people with dated attitudes.

There was of course a shocking flaw in her article - the writer was completely unaware that the GAA is not responsible for women's Gaelic football, or for camogie.So her attack on the GAA was a bizarre attack on the wrong organisation.

(It would make perfect sense to have both women's and men's football organised by the same body; but it's the LGFA which has so far refused to consider a merger. The GAA has tried to being them into the GAA tent, so that they could
have the exact same facilities and support that male players get, but the LGFA recently told the GAA to get lost.)

It was disappointing that an academic person, otherwise used to doing research and getting the facts before committing anything to print, could be so blinded by prejudice that they would write and proof-read a lengthy article without having the faintest idea about the very basics of the organisation they're attacking.

And it certainly speaks volumes for Ireland's middle-class bigotry that nobody in the Irish Times realised the central flaw in her article either. What next - an article attacking the Automobile Association for the poor quality of their lifeboats?

Still, in middle-class suburban Ireland, a bit of GAA-bashing can be socially advantageous - it's a virtue-signalling dog whistle that the person doing the bashing is neither a culchie nor a nationalist; both attributes always a plus at the right sort of pre-covid dinner parties.

I doubt very much if such an error-filled screeed about any other sport would have passed sub-editorial scrutiny. A nonsensical article; but they couldn't wait to get it printed."
I have no idea how that article got past an sub-editor in a national newspaper. The author genuinely didn't seem to know that the GAA doesn't run women's Gaelic games.

That's not to say we shouldn't be introspective and look how we can improve the GAA for women members, however having actual facts are important as a baseline!

Morty (Westmeath) - Posts: 187 - 04/01/2021 12:25:28    2325924

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Replying To essmac:  "Couple of days ago, an academic, writing in the Irish Times, went on a bizarre and fact-free rant about "misogyny" in "the GAA"; and how "the GAA" treated women appallingly etc.

This article was publicised primarily on the front page of the paper.

The writer could, with some justification, have stated that women's participation in sport overall is still not all it could be; and that there are still too many people with dated attitudes.

There was of course a shocking flaw in her article - the writer was completely unaware that the GAA is not responsible for women's Gaelic football, or for camogie.So her attack on the GAA was a bizarre attack on the wrong organisation.

(It would make perfect sense to have both women's and men's football organised by the same body; but it's the LGFA which has so far refused to consider a merger. The GAA has tried to being them into the GAA tent, so that they could
have the exact same facilities and support that male players get, but the LGFA recently told the GAA to get lost.)

It was disappointing that an academic person, otherwise used to doing research and getting the facts before committing anything to print, could be so blinded by prejudice that they would write and proof-read a lengthy article without having the faintest idea about the very basics of the organisation they're attacking.

And it certainly speaks volumes for Ireland's middle-class bigotry that nobody in the Irish Times realised the central flaw in her article either. What next - an article attacking the Automobile Association for the poor quality of their lifeboats?

Still, in middle-class suburban Ireland, a bit of GAA-bashing can be socially advantageous - it's a virtue-signalling dog whistle that the person doing the bashing is neither a culchie nor a nationalist; both attributes always a plus at the right sort of pre-covid dinner parties.

I doubt very much if such an error-filled screeed about any other sport would have passed sub-editorial scrutiny. A nonsensical article; but they couldn't wait to get it printed."
Essmac it is true that paper does nt refuse ink.Just because we read does nt mean its true.Yes it is true to say though that the gaa have reached out to both the camoige and LGFA but to no avail.However while I don't know the story with the camoige association I know from people involved in the LGFA that they claim in the early years they were not treated too well by the gaa and felt they were looked down upon by the hierarchy of the gaa.For those reasons they paddled their own canoe.However I believe the relationship is much better now but they still stay a separate entity.To my knowledge I think the LGFA ran their organisation from Croke park for a long time and are based in jones s road now.

CiarraiMick (Dublin) - Posts: 1124 - 04/01/2021 12:59:33    2325929

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Replying To brisbane:  "Remember when FAI boys Stephen Kenny and Damien Duff called the GAA a bunch of Dinosaurs ?
Remember how the FAI are indebted to Mike Ashley and pay him 100k a month ?
Mike Ashley is sponsoring Cork GAA at a cost of 2 Million.

Well done to Cork GAA. Not bad for a bunch of Dinosaurs lol"
https://www.rte.ie/sport/gaa/2021/0104/1187614-roscommon-fundraiser-raises-over-900k/

Fionn (Dublin) - Posts: 3334 - 05/01/2021 12:27:10    2326092

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The issue with gender in GAA is important for number of reasons. Sport is meant to be now for both genders, funding from govt etc has a specific requirement for it. GAA, Camogie association and LGFA are three separate bodies. However a girl playing for Ballyboden is a member of Ballyboden. So at grassroots they are not separate entities. They pay the same membership fees etc. If people knew for instance the high insurance premiums girls are charged for playing GAA. A boy can be as low as €10 euro per annum for playing hurling and football, a girl €50 this comes out of club fees. This because of the separate associations. But it all breaks down when it comes to fixtures at club as far as the two ladies organisation are concerned the other one doeent exist. The result is chaos, these two organisations are doing a disservice to their sports and especially player welfare. Govt should call a day on these two dinosaur organisations.

arock (Dublin) - Posts: 4513 - 05/01/2021 19:36:23    2326181

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Replying To brisbane:  "Remember when FAI boys Stephen Kenny and Damien Duff called the GAA a bunch of Dinosaurs ?
Remember how the FAI are indebted to Mike Ashley and pay him 100k a month ?
Mike Ashley is sponsoring Cork GAA at a cost of 2 Million.

Well done to Cork GAA. Not bad for a bunch of Dinosaurs lol"
In fairness werent the gaa being real ***** on that issue,, they wouldn't let Páirc Uí Chaoimh play host to a memorial game because it was soccer,, a stadium that cost a fortune and lies idle 360 days of the year no less.
Unless I'm missing something.....

Galway9801 (Galway) - Posts: 172 - 06/01/2021 13:16:33    2326286

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Replying To Galway9801:  "In fairness werent the gaa being real ***** on that issue,, they wouldn't let Páirc Uí Chaoimh play host to a memorial game because it was soccer,, a stadium that cost a fortune and lies idle 360 days of the year no less.
Unless I'm missing something....."
No, They weren't even asked if the game could be host. The soccer lads just decided the game would be played there. Cant blame the GAA for putting money into stadiums while the FAI put money into shady places

brisbane (Galway) - Posts: 501 - 06/01/2021 19:15:18    2326355

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Replying To brisbane:  "No, They weren't even asked if the game could be host. The soccer lads just decided the game would be played there. Cant blame the GAA for putting money into stadiums while the FAI put money into shady places"
Fair enough but they still shoulda just said yeah.
It was a memorial game for a young man who lost his life to illness.
If I was in charge I wouldn't have had to be asked. I would have offered straight away.

Galway9801 (Galway) - Posts: 172 - 06/01/2021 19:47:45    2326367

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Replying To Galway9801:  "Fair enough but they still shoulda just said yeah.
It was a memorial game for a young man who lost his life to illness.
If I was in charge I wouldn't have had to be asked. I would have offered straight away."
The GAA were right and did the right thing when they were asked formally.

ONdeDITCH (Limerick) - Posts: 599 - 06/01/2021 21:02:31    2326379

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Replying To Galway9801:  "Fair enough but they still shoulda just said yeah.
It was a memorial game for a young man who lost his life to illness.
If I was in charge I wouldn't have had to be asked. I would have offered straight away."
Everyone knows the GAA are always there when needed. The problem was being taken for granted and they done the right thing in the end. I don't think soccer is the place on GAA grounds but this was for a special cause. Could have been sorted behind closed doors but mouth pieces had to start throwing insults.

Saynothing (Tyrone) - Posts: 366 - 06/01/2021 22:34:59    2326396

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