ROYAL COUNTY YEARBOOK ARTICLES

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An Gaeltacht Athboy Baconstown Ballinabrackey
Ballinlough Ballivor Bective Bellewstown
Blackhall Gaels Boardsmill Carnaross Castletown
Clann na nGael Clonard Cortown Curraha
Donaghmore/Ash Drumbaragh Drumconrath Drumree
Duleek Dunboyne Dunderry Dunsany
Dunshaughlin Enfield Gaeil Colmcille Kilbride
Kildalkey Killyon Killallon Kilmainham
Kilmainhamwood Kilmessan Kilskyre Kiltale
Longwood Meath Hill Moylagh Moynalty
Moynalvey Na Fianna Nobber Oldcastle
O'Mahonys Rathkenny Rathmolyon Ratoath
Seneschalstown Simonstown Skryne Slane
St. Brigids St. Colmcilles St. Marys St. Michaels
St. Pats St. Pauls St. Ultans St. Vincents
Summerhill Syddan Trim Walterstown
Wolfe Tones St. Cuthberts    
       

 

COUNTY
2011
Boylan Leinster breakthrough Camogie Cian Ward
  Clarke's Fresh Fruit Coaching Colm Doherty
  Croke Cup Crossakiel Handball David McGowan
  Donal Smyth Dunboyne Ladies 2011 Enda Tyrrell
  Football Team of the Year Dr Gerry Cummins Gerry Curran
  Great Rivalries Greg Ennis Handball
  Hurling Team of the Year Intel John Smyth
  Junior Football Ladies Colleges Ladies Football
  Martin Doyle Mick O'Brien Minor Football
  Minor Hurling Myra Flaherty Nicky Horan
  Noel Moran Ollie Geraghty Peter Darby
  Peter McDermott Ratoath U17 Ray Cunningham
  Rory Donnelly Seamus Kenny Seamus McEnaney
  Senior Football Senior Hurlers Shane Kelly
  Tom Duff Tony Fox Tony McDonnell
  U21 Football U21 Hurlers Valley Cafe
  Thornton Waste Vocational Schools  
       
       
2010
     
       
       
2009
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       
2008
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     
       
2007
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
2006
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
       
2005
 
 
 
 
 
 
       
2004
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
       
2003
 
 
 
 
 
       

 

 

 

An Gaeltacht
2002
A treasured 25-years
It was the year Elvis died, Red Rum won the Aintree Grand National for the third time, Cork won the All-Ireland hurling title and Dublin won the Sam Maguire cup. It was also the year An Gaeltacht were formed and Sean Mac Donncha was elected club treasurer.
2001
An Gaeltacht seek improvement
It was another disappointing year for An Gaeltacht with only one championship win to show for their efforts. Former All-Ireland medalist Barry Ferguson was player/manager in 2001 and feels that the club didn't do itself justice.
2000
The Handy man
Jim Timmons and An Gaeltacht football club have a long association. Since An Gaeltacht was formed in 1976 (the club began competing the following year), Jim Timmons has filled many positions and played many parts to help make An Gaeltacht the club it now is.
1999
Cathal's settled Scor
Cathal Seoige enjoys his work as Irish Officer on the Co. Board executive. He also enjoyed his playing days with Martinstown-Athboy and An Gaeltacht. Here he talks to Royal County about his lifelong involvement in the GAA.
1998
Ghaeilgóirí an Mhí
Tá an réiguín ins an Ghaeltacht, Rath Cairn cáillithe do alán rudaí ach go háirithe an pheil, thar gach rud eile. Anois chuireann Padraig O'Baoighill a shúil thar iarrachtaí na fir ó Rath Cairn.
   

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Athboy
2002
Young guns take centre stage
Athboy - Rathcairn's under 14 team came tantalisingly close to pulling off a league and championship football double this year. Juvenile chairman Stephen Mangan reviewed an exciting year for the club's young guns.
2001
Back where they belong
While two clubs, Trim and Kilmessan, are running neck and neck at the head of the Meath senior hurling roll of honour, Athboy are in third place with nine outright triumphs. However, they have not celebrated with the Jubilee Cup since the spring of 1973.
2000
Differing fortunes
While their hurlers were relegated, Athboy's footballers were making soild progress. Royal County contrasts the differing fortunes of both sides.
1999
Athboy's loss was Wexford's gain
The Wexford minors brought Meath's participation in this year's championship to an end. Athboy native Eddie Mahon trained the winning team. Shane O'Brien asked him to explain himself.
1998
Lots of toil, little success
When Christy Kelly came onto the Athboy hurling side, success seemed inevitable. 24 years later he retired with five senior final defeats as his lot. Royal Meath discovers a man who still feels that he gained a lot from his association with the game.
   


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Baconstown
1999
Underage success boosts Baconstown's future prospects
Baconstown underage coach Vincent Dargan reflects on two underage wins for the club this year and how the adult section of the club fared out these past twelve months.
1998
Deacon's Blues
Ok, that's a more irristable than factually correct heading. The truth is Donie Flynn is as enthusiastic as ever for the Baconstown cause as Royal County found out.
   

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Ballinabrackey
2011
Bracks wonÕt rest on their laurels
Pascal Kelleghan is challenging his Ballinabrackey players to build on their phenomenal achievements of the past 12 months and become a senior club in the not too distant future.
2010
Ballinabrackey goals bag the Ginnity Cup
A fifth ever Meath Junior Football Championship triumph by Ballinabrackey was enthusiastically greeted following the narrow final victory over south county rivals Ballivor in the curtain-raiser to the Keegan Cup decider.
2009
ÔBracks hope to make 2010 a happy 25th anniversary
Ballinabrackey went across the border to find a manager who might help steer them to the Junior Football Championship title in 2009, but they met with further disappointment when they failed to reach the knockout stages for the sixth successive year. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Brack attack
Ballinabrackey's best known footballer Chris O'Connor featured in Meath's three championship matches during a disappointingly brief 2008 campaign for Colm Coyle's team, while there was another bright star from the club playing a very significant role in the minor side's highly successful year, Damien Carroll.
2007
The rise and rise of Chris O'Connor
Chris O'Connor enjoyed a meteoric rise through the ranks in 2007, culminating in his first championship start for Meath in the memorable All-Ireland quarter-final victory over Tyrone at Croke Park. His elevation to Colm Coyle's squad has seen him join an elite group of Ballinabrackey players who have represented their county at the highest level.
2006
Itching to get back
The long wait gets longer for Ballinabrackey as the gap back to their last Junior Football Championship success lengthens with each passing year. It's now 21 years since the Offaly-border club last tasted success in the grade, but the desire to do so once again remains strong and they are a team that nobody will take for granted in the 2007 campaign. By Paul Clarke.
2005
Not far off the pace
It doesn't seem like two decades have passed since Ballinabrackey last won the Meath Junior Football Championship title. But it is and as time goes steadily by the club's loyal supporters must be starting to wonder if the Offaly-border side will ever reach such heights again. By Paul Clarke.
2004
Not far off
It's fast approaching two decades since Ballinabrackey last won the Meath Junior Football Championship and the Offaly-border club possesses a burning desire to lift some important silverware and start to move up the footballing ladder.
2003
Hot stuff!
As John Curry looks back on the summer of 2003 he will have a certain degree of ‘we under achieved yet again' from a club point of view, but reflections on the inter-county scene will bring nothing but immense satisfaction and a sense of achievement.
2002
The Bracks are back
Ballinabrackey full-back Trevor Bannon put it best. "It was a good year. We got promoted in the league and that was our aim. As for the championship, we were unlucky against Nobber in the semi-final but we are getting closer, every year that bit closer."
2001
Four decades of service
Forty years after he first donned the Ballinabrackey jersey, Tommy O'Connor remains as involved in the club as ever. Randal Scally spoke to Tommy about his lifelong association with the Offaly-border outfit as well as his hopes for the future.
2000
The Rare Old Times
Royal County talks to Seamus Fox whose allegiance to the Ballinabrackey club stretches back to the 1940s.
1999
Ballinabrackey start them young
With the Ballinabrackey junior side failing to make an impact in the year just past, it was up to the club's under 12s to bring glory to the Offaly-border parish. Here, club stalwart Jim Cooney outlines the great strides that are being made at underage level.
1998
Meath and proud of it
Have you ever heard of Father Callary? Perhaps not. He was Parish Priest of Ballinabrackey back in the 1940s -50s and he was instrumental in having something approved by Leinster Council GAA which has been of major significance.

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Ballinlough
2011
Out of ÔLough
BallinloughÕs bid to regain senior status came unstuck at the semi-final stage of the IFC when they suffered a narrow defeat to neighbours Gaeil Colmcille. The loss was all the harder to take after two penalties were missed, but while ruing his sideÕs misfortune, the long-serving Kevin Devine refuses to be disheartened.
2010
ÔLough aim for improvement in 2011
BallinloughÕs first two campaigns back in the Intermediate Football Championship brought the disappointment of elimination during the knockout stages, but this year they failed to advance from their group after a mixed bag of results. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Extra time curse strikes again
Ballinlough have reached the knockout stages of the Intermediate Football Championship in both their campaigns back in the middle grade and after losing to Cortown at the semi-final hurdle in 2008 they were eliminated a step earlier this year when Oldcastle got the better of them in a last eight clash. Interestingly, both those matches went to extra-time. By Paul Clarke.
2008
A Byrneing light!
BallinloughÕs bid to win the Meath IFC and Division 3 FL double in 2008 finished empty handed but, according to county star Peadar Byrne, the north Meath club will be a force to be reckoned with again in the year ahead.
2007
It finally happened
Ballinlough's 16 years in the top flight came to an end on the first Saturday of October in 2007 when survival specialists Kilmainhamwood defeated them decisively in the Senior Football Championship relegation final at Kells to send them back to the intermediate ranks.
2006
Underage revival
2006 was a successful year for Ballinlough at juvenile level, with the under 12s capturing a league title and the under 14s only losing to St. Vincent's after a replay in their championship final. Michael Geraghty has been a driving force behind the club's recent underage revival and, not surprisingly, took great satisfaction from this year's achievements.
2005
Survivors
Ballinlough have had better years. Two-thousand-and-five descended into a real struggle for the north Meath club, who found themselves fighting relegation battles on both league and championship fronts. The form displayed over the course of the year wasn't the strain of consistency manager Gary McDonnell demanded, and it was all hands to the pump as Ballinlough's senior survival hung by a thread in late autumn. However, they pulled it out of the fire with a dramatic play-off victory over Dunderry at Athboy on Sunday October 23. Experienced campaigner Dan McCartan, who missed much of the season through injury, is hoping for a major upturn in fortunes in 2006.
2004
Team spirit the key for Ballinlough
Ballinlough may not have the same playing resources as some of their rivals, but they more than make up for this with their tremendous team spirit as veteran forward Francis Tunney explains.
2003
Minors make history
By clinching their first-ever minor trophy in September, Ballinlough proved that there's plenty of life in their neck of the woods. The MFL Div. 3 success provided the club with a welcome boost and the signs are encouraging that there could be plenty more where that came from.
2002
Ray of light
It is highly unlikely that Blackhall Gaels will receive any Christmas cards from GAA folk in Ballinlough this winter. Not once, but twice in the 2002 senior football championship the North Meath club found themselves on the receiving end of a Blackhall victory.
2001
Big Tom and Ballinlough
Grit and determination marked Ballinlough's year at underage level in 2001. Defeats in two finals during the year was hard to take. Later on in the year the north Meath club gained under 17 honours but the club's under 14 players showed tremendous courage also to make little of their travails and lift the North League Division 4 crown as mentor Tom Brady reminds us..
2000
Red alert
Team manager Vincent Ryan put together a very talented Ballinlough under 16 combination in 2000. Young players like Smith, Geraghty, Gaynor, Fagan, Muldoon, McEnroe and Farrell will surely backbone the club's premier xv in ten years time
1999
League specialists
After acute championship disappointment, the men from North Meath found the perfect remedy in the form of the Division 1 League title.
1998
A patient man's reward
Not noted for their underage success, Ballinlough had reason to celebrate in 1998. U12 and U13 honours were garnered and a delighted Sean Smith talks to Royal County.
   

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Ballivor
2011
Brilliant Ballivor make amends
Ballivor put the heartache of last yearÕs JFC final defeat to Ballinabrackey firmly behind them when they powered to their first Matthew Ginnity Cup success after an unbeaten campaign in September.
2010
Ballivor regroup to become a real force
Eight years after winning the IFC final in dramatic fashion at Pairc Tailteann the Navan venue was the home of disappointment for Ballivor in 2010 when they were edged out by Ballinabrackey in the JFC decider. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Finding their feet
It was the sort of day when convincing the doubters about the dangers of global warming would have been next to impossible. The second last Sunday of November, 2008 at Martry was cold, damp and miserable and it also signalled the end of Ballivor's most recent stay in the Intermediate Football Championship. By Paul Clarke.
2008
We will be back
Only six years after all the drama, excitement and jubilation of beating Navan O'Mahonys in the Intermediate Championship final, Ballivor diced with death in the middle grade of Meath football again in 2008.
2007
Ballivor won't give in
Ballivor GFC can look back on a tough year but also one which galvanised the club and ultimately showed a gritty spirit to remain in the Intermediate Football Championship as they overcame all the obstacles that were placed in their way to avoid the drop down to junior. By Paul Cantwell.
2006
Nothing comes easy
Ballivor can remember vividly what it's like to win the Intermediate Football Championship and they can also remember very clearly what it's like to lose your top flight status before you have a chance to find your feet in the senior grade. By Paul Clarke.
2005
A good start isn't half the battle!
Ballivor made an atrocious start to their Intermediate Football Championship campaign, but they somehow managed to recover sufficiently to make it through to the quarter-finals where they were eliminated by Syddan. By Paul Clarke
2004
Back on song
Under the watchful eye of Westmeath favourite Larry Giles, the 2002 intermediate champions rediscovered their winning touch to clinch promotion to Division Two of the ACFL.
2003
Fighting finish
Looking back, it's hard not to see the irony in it all. Besides, September is the month of change. And just as the leaves fluttered to the ground this September, Ballivor's footballers tumbled out of the top flight. Damn September. Damn irony.
2002
Ballivor at last
It is often said that you have to lose a final before winning one and that is often the case in the Meath Intermediate Football Championship. Dunderry and St Patrick's both suffered their share of disappointments before collecting the title and Ballivor finished second in two deciders before making it ‘third time lucky' with that dramatic 2-5 to 0-10 victory over Navan O'Mahonys last October.
2001
Third time lucky?
Ballivor tasted Intermediate football final defeat for the second successive year, this time at the hands of Blackhall Gaels who snatched victory with a last gasp penalty. It has to be third time lucky next year.
2000
Ballivor fall at final hurdle
When a place in the senior ranks was up for grabs Ballivor choose the wrong time to give one of their poorest performances of the year. But they needn't worry, as they will be back.
1999
A tireless worker
The Intermediate title eluded Ballivor in 1999 but with people like Caroline Burke involved at administrative level, no stone will be left unturned in their bid to capture the Mattie McDonnell Cup.
1998
Good times beckon for Ballivor
Championship triumph proved elusive but it was nevertheless a very good year for Ballivor GFC. Royal County spoke to their manager Willie Keegan and suddenly found himself indulging in a bit of nostalgia.
   

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Bective
2011
League silverware for Bective boys
If awards were handed out for consistency Bective would undoubtedly have received one at the end of 2011.
2010
Bective: a new dawn?
Ten years after the clubÕs short-lived stint in the Intermediate grade came to an end, a new dawn appears to be on the horizon for Bective. Up and coming star Marty Mulhall spoke to Royal County.Ê
2009
Eager to improve
The 2009 Junior Football Championship proved to be a real struggle for Bective who achieved only one victory in the group stages and found themselves anchored to the bottom of the section and in the relegation play-off position. But with Drumree having withdrawn from the competition it looked like they would be spared the dogfight. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Proud part of the Navan trio
One of three GAA clubs in Navan, Bective may be the smallest of the trio but they continue to keep the flag flying proudly with their dedicated band of workers fielding teams in various football grades from the lowest underage up to junior. By Noel Coogan.
2007
Plenty of promise and potential
Having to field an under-strength team in the early stages of the Junior Football Championship proved a heavy burden for Bective and defeats in their opening three divisional matches put an end to their hopes of making it through to the knockout stages.
2006
Talented u14's steal the show
Top teams are built on a different type of determination and never-say-die spirit. When it comes to the crunch the best team always stand up in the last ten minutes. Rarely is an underage side made up of these qualities, but this was the case when it came to the Bective U14 team in 2006. By Marcus Brennan.
2005
A marked improvement
Despite a superb run comprising four straight wins in Division C of the 2005 Meath junior football championship, Bective narrowly missed out on a place in the knockout stage of the competition Ð but they were not to be denied their first piece of adult silverware in eight years. Playing better football than they had done in quite some time, they finished the season in style, claiming the Division Five league crown with a 1-6 to 1-5 defeat of Clann na Gael at Bohermeen on Saturday October 1. Ruairi Russell believes there's plenty more where that came from.
2004
The kids are all right
At juvenile level, 2004 was a truly historic year for Bective, who struck on two fronts, capturing the U14 Division Two Football Championship and the U15 Division Four title.
2003
Historic triumph for Bective minors
Bective enjoyed one of their finest hours this year. Amidst the hype surrounding Navan O'Mahony's and Simonstown, Bective refused to be eclipsed in Meath's chief town.
2002
What's another year?
Sean Moran and his beleaguered Bective colleagues hung their heads in despair. The final whistle had sounded and the game was all over. Sportingly they shook the hands of the opposing, victorious, Wolfe Tones players who had just annihilated them 2-11 to 0-6. It was only mid-June but Bective's junior championship ambitions were already over for another year.
2001
Looking to regain the winning touch
After surprising many within the county by reaching the semi-finals of the Intermediate championship in 1999, two bad years has pushed Bective back from whence they came: languishing in the junior grade. Their long serving forward, John Sheehan, believes that all is not lost, however, and that the club can make a concerted push towards the junior championship in 2002.
2000
Under 14's create history
The club's adults might have had a year to forget, but the Bective under 14s managed to preserve some level of pride by completing a league and championship double, in the process becoming the first Bective side to win an underage championship. Roscommon native Manus Tiernan was one of five men over the side, and he was delighted by the success.
1999
Mister Versatile
Standing at 5' 7”, he wouldn't be most people's idea of the perfect goalkeeper. But when Bective were short of one this year, Davy Cahill agreed to stand between the sticks. He speaks about a long run in the intermediate championship, and an even longer one in football.
1998
Perseverance brings success
The rags to riches story of the Bective Club should act as an inspiration to others throughout the Royal County. And now that they've sampled the sweet taste of success they're hungry for more as Royal County discovered when we talked to Juvenile Committee Chairman Dessie O'Brien.
   

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Bellewstown
 
2007
Bellewstown won't give up the race
As the club continued to struggle with falling playing numbers, Bellewstown GFC endured another difficult year in both the Junior B Football championship and the Division 5 FL, but the Gaels of the club continue to work at the coalface.
2006
The good fight
This time 20 years ago Bellewstown GFC was living the high life as players, officials and its passionate band of supporters shortened the winter months of 1986 with glorious memories of a fabulous championship triumph. By Paul Clarke.
2005
Commitment the key
With one of the smallest picks in the county, Bellewstown have found the going tough these past few years. But despite their difficulties, team manager Martin McEnteggart is convinced that the black and ambers can begin the climb back up the Meath footballing ladder, starting with a junior ÔB' championship win next year.
2004
How fortunes change
Bellewstown's ambition to start their climb back up the Meath footballing ladder met with further disappointment in 2004 when they failed to reach the business end of the battle for the junior ‘B' Football Championship.
2003
Boys from the hill
Perhaps the players knew it themselves. St Vincent's had just beaten them in the first round of the junior B championship, and there was that haunting feeling of inevitability hanging in the Bellewstown dressing-room.
2002
B for Bellewstown
Bellewstown, to say the very least, endured a difficult and unsuccessful year in 2002 which saw them relegated in both the championship and league and the hope for next year will be that things can only get better.
2001
Making headway
P.J. Cudden made his bow as a football coach in 2001. Training and managing his native Bellewstown was a real learning experience, he admits. We recently rolled the tape back in his company.
2000
Girl Power
Finally Bellewstown ladies collected the Junior championship title. The Royal county talked to the man who helped make it all possible, Mick Collins.
1999
A jewel in the Bellewstown crown
Bellewstown's Eimear McAuley has blazed an impressive trail since breaking onto the Meath senior team two years ago. Royal County talked to the 18 year old about life on the Meath senior team and the progress being made by the Bellewstown ladies.
1998
Pride in the Parish
Bellewstown's Alex Collins talks to Royal County about the ongoing struggles facing a small rural club and his own personal loyalty to the cause.
   

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Blackhall Gaels
2011
Blackhall fail to build on explosive start
BlackhallÕs failure to build on their 20-point demolition of Simonstown Gaels in the first round of this yearÕs SFC was a source of huge disappointment to everyone associated with the south Meath club as chairman Gerry Stenson explains.
2010
Blackhall Gaels pay the penalty
Before the start of the 2010 Meath Farm Machinery SFC Blackhall Gaels appeared to have a decent chance of qualifying from their group but after two wins, a draw and two losses, they narrowly missed out on a place in the last eight.Ê
2009
Looking to regain their scoring touch
Senior Football Championship life after Anthony Moyles brought mixed fortunes for Blackhall Gaels in 2009 and after scraping through the group stages they were eliminated from the title race when losing to Dunshaughlin in the preliminary quarter-final. By Paul Clarke.
2008
League Winners
Eamonn Barry's first term as Blackhall Gaels manager brought them to the semi-finals of the Senior Football Championship, but more importantly led them to silverware as the ACFL Division 1 title was garnered with an impressive final win over Wolfe Tones.
2007
Injuries hamper the gaels
For the first time since winning the title in 2003, Blackhall Gaels failed to make it through to the closing stages of the Meath SFC this year with injuries to key players considerably weakening them.
2006
League is more than just compensation
There were high expectation in Blackhall Gaels at the start of the year that the championship could be brought back to the parish, but at the end of the season those involved with the club had to be content with the ACFL Division 2 trophy.
2005
Intermediate glory at small ball game
Blackhall Gaels joined a small and elite club on the fourth Sunday of October when they pounced late to defeat Na Fianna in a highly entertaining Intermediate Hurling Championship final at Trim.
2004
Minors put hurling in the limelight
Football stole the limelight in Blackhall Gaels during 2003 but twelve months later hurling was the toast of the parish.
2003
Rags to riches tale of Gaels
Mol an Oige agus Tiocfaidh Siad- Start them young and they will flourish. The above statement is one, which has clearly been the motto around Batterstown, and Kilcloon and it bore fruit on September 21st.
2002
Blackhall on the brink
Blackhall Gaels' premier adult football team has certainly had an up and down existence since the club was formed in 1995 and the happenings of last season added another exciting chapter to the short lifespan.
2001
Gaels force their way back up
Many felt Blackhall Gaels were rather unfortunate to drop down from senior ranks last year when going down thanks to a last minute point by O'Mahonys. As Brendan Boylan reports however, they wiped out those painful memories in the best way possible when dishing out a similar fate to Ballivor.
2000
Down but not out
Blackhall Gaels' luck deserted them in the relegation play-off matches against O'Mahonys. Royal County takes a look at the season that saw them drop a grade.
1999
A Minor miracle
Blackhall Gaels' steady climb up the ladder of Meath GAA continued in 1999 with their Minors surprising many by bringing home the Delaney Cup. Royal County recounts the latest chapter in the club's success story.
1998
The Gaels blow into Senior
Blackhall Gaels are in existence only four short years. The amalgamation between Kilcoon and Batterstown had its doubting Thomases. But, as Royal County finds out, 1998 and an intermediate title success, proved the doubters wrong.
   

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Boardsmill
2011
From agony to ecstasy
What a difference 12 months makes. Boardsmill intermediate hurlers went into the 2010 county final as strong favourites to make a swift return to the senior ranks, but favourites are there to be knocked and underdogs Drumree came away with a shock win.
2010
Injury time goal haunts Boardsmill
When Boardsmill commenced their quest for an instant return to the senior ranks with a runaway victory over Drumree in the first round of the IHC nobody could possibly have predicted that a few months later they would be beaten by the same opposition in the final. By Paul Clarke.
2009
One step back - two steps forward?
Having spent nine years at the top table of Meath hurling following their IHC success in 2000, Boardsmill were demoted to the intermediate ranks at the end of the this year's SHC campaign. By Liam OÕRourke.
2008
50 years on
There have been many proud days in the history of Boardsmill GAA Club and one of the most memorable undoubtedly came in late 1958 when they made the breakthrough by winning the Senior Hurling Championship for the first time. By Paul Clarke.
2007
TJ Reilly and those decades of service
Over three decades ago a highly committed hurler from the Boardsmill club helped Meath to a very significant victory over Kildare in the Walsh Cup at Trim. The Lilywhites were highly regarded in the small ball code in those days, turning in some superb performances against the top counties.
2006
Moving forward
The gap to Boardsmill's last annexation of the Jubilee Cup stretches back over three decades to the year they completed a fabulous three in-a-row in 1975 and their hopes of regaining the title this year appeared to be enhanced considerably when they beat Trim in a play-off, but they then bowed out against Dunboyne.
2005
Boardsmill land their prize
Some years ago Boardsmill were the kingpins of Meath hurling but in more recent times football seems to have taken over as the main focus in the club with two championship titles gained and notable progress being made in the big ball game.
2004
Dicing with danger
For a club like Boardsmill, with a proud tradition in the Senior Hurling Championship, holding onto your standing in the top grade is highly important. And that's how it turned out for the south Meath side in 2004 as they diced with death before securing their survival in the last chance saloon.
2003
Out of luck!
After being better known as a hurling club over the last few decades, Boardsmill have been carving a football niche for themselves over the past couple of years. The junior C success of 2002 was their first championship triumph in the big ball game and then they came tantalisingly close to adding the junior B title last September.
2002
Champions
Sometimes it just means more! Boardsmill's footballers have trudged along in relative anonymity since the start of time, but over the last few years they have started to make an impact at underage level.
2001
The Mill grind out minor success
2001 marked only the second time that Boardsmill fielded a football team at minor level. However, such is the talent being nurtured at underage level within the club that many more landmark achievements - like the club's minor title success - are doubtless just around the corner.
2000
Through the ‘Mill
The disappointment of the Boardsmill players, mentors and supporters at suffering relegation from the senior hurling ranks in 1999 was erased this year when they bounced right back to claim the Intermediate title. It was an expected victory for the south Meath club but one that was savoured nonetheless.
1999
A true Gael
A native of Cuil-Aodha in west Cork, Peadar O Liathain arrived in Boardsmill on the 3rd November 1951 to take up a teaching post in the local National School. Cork's loss has been Boardsmill's gain.
1998
The Future is bright
A great year indeed for the Boardsmill club as various titles were captured in both codes. Welcome success for one of the county's smallest football clubs as Boardsmill U13's best in thrilling final against Clan na Gael
   

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Carnaross
2011
Carnaross out of luck
CarnarossÕ failure to build on their appearance in last yearÕs IFC final was a source of huge disappointment to their captain Paddy Nugent who believes they didnÕt get the same breaks in this seasonÕs campaign.
2010
Final off day shouldnÕt take from the Carnaross resurgence
Carnaross surprised many people by reaching the Intermediate Football Championship final this year, but as was the case seven years earlier they suffered a heavy defeat on the day that mattered most.
2009
Status secure
One victory and four defeats left Carnaross well out of the reckoning for a place in the knockout stage of the 2009 Intermediate Football Championship, but with plenty of talented young players coming through the ranks in the club there are certainly reasons to be optimistic as they look to the future.
2008
So much promise
Carnaross exited the race for the Mattie McDonnell Cup at the last eight hurdle in 2007, but they were eliminated one step earlier this year when Syddan ended their dream of a first title in the intermediate grade since 1993 in a preliminary quarter-final.
2007
Carnaross show big improvement
After a near disastrous 2006, Carnaross showed a welcome return to form this year by reaching the knock-out stages of the intermediate football championship. Club secretary Brendan O'Reilly was pleased with the team's much-improved displays and is hopeful that they can mount a serious title challenge in 2008.
2006
Injuries prove insurmountable
It was as nondescript and unexpected a place as possible for it all to end. Right at the outset, before it had even started. By Gordan Manning
2005
Surprised at the death
Carnaross will probably win the award for comeback of the year, but that will be of little consolation to the club as they look back on 2005 and an Intermediate Football Championship campaign that appeared to promise quite a lot in the divisional stages, but came to an end when they were eliminated by surprise packets St. Colmcille's after extra-time in the quarter-finals.
2004
Slow start catches up with Carnaross
Carnaross will have to wait another year for a tilt at Intermediate Football Championship honours following their semi-final defeat at the hands of east Meath outfit Duleek at Pairc Tailteann on Sunday September 19. Royal County asked club chairman Malachy Plunkett: what happened the likely lads?
2003
Good year despite final performance
What have the following teams got in common? Navan O'Mahonys, Ballivor, Blackhall Gaels and St Patricks? They have won the last four intermediate championships having been beaten in the previous year's final! And what about Dunderry? They were beaten in three successive finals before winning it at the fourth time of asking in 1990!
2002
Three times and out
Carnaross could be forgiven for having nightmares at the prospect of facing Slane in the Intermediate Football Championship. They have lost to them three times in the competition in the last two years, including twice in the 2002 season, and that second play-off defeat ended their hopes of winning the championship for the first time since 1993 and bouncing back to senior football.
2001
Aidan Gillic's refereeing years
There's not many referees, past or present, who can say that every minute of their time in black has been enjoyable and well worth living out. Former top-notch whistler from Carnaross, Aidan Gillic, says the business of refereeing was the best thing he ever did on the GAA front.
2000
The more things change ...
In an interview with Royal County, Carnaross GFC President Jack Smith recalls his own playing days and assesses the current state of his beloved club.
1999
A mixed bag
Nineteen-ninety-nine was a strange year for Carnaross, a season tatooed by ups and downs. First of all, their star player Ollie Murphy inspired Meath to their seventh All-Ireland; then they lost their senior status; finally, they bounced back to finish the year on a high note by winning the Division Two league title.
1998
The Murphy legacy
As a player, Benny Murphy seemed to go on forever. Carnaross are keeping their fingers crossed that he'll do likewise as a valuable member of their backroom team. Royal County meets the man in question.
   

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Castletown
2011
Castletown bridge seven-year gap
When Castletown defeated St. ColmcilleÕs in this yearÕs IFC, it ended a three-year wait for a victory in the group stage. When they added the ACFL Division Two title with victory over Oldcastle in the final, they claimed their first piece of adult silverware in seven years. Team captain Barry Smith admits it was a huge relief for everyone associated with the north county club to get back to winning ways.
2010
Castletown are capable of more than just survival
Castletown remain unwilling to surrender their intermediate championship status, but they again gave their supporters many anxious moments during the 2010 campaign before staving off the threat of a drop to the junior ranks. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Survival instinct intact
As the Castletown players headed to Pairc Tailteann on a Friday evening in late October this year they must have been asking themselves how they ended up where they were. With a bit of luck at all they might have reached the knockout stages of the Intermediate Football Championship, but the reality was so very different. By Paul Clarke.
2008
The winds of change
Natural progression might have suggested that Castletown would win the Intermediate Football Championship this year. They suffered the disappointment of losing at the semi-final stage to neighbours Rathkenny in 2006 and the pain was even more severe approximately 12 months later when they were beaten in the final by Donaghmore/Ashbourne.
2007
Final heartbreak for Castletown
If Castletown thought it was painful last year, it must have hurt a great deal more in 2007 when they came up short in a highly entertaining Intermediate Football Championship final at Pairc Tailteann on the third Sunday of October.
2006
Plenty of promise
Three decades have passed since Castletown last won the Intermediate Football Championship title and the search goes on after a 2006 campaign that promised much but failed to deliver as Sean Barry's team exited the race for the Mattie McDonnell Cup at the semi-final stage against neighbours Rathkenny.
2005
Aiming to break the quarter-final jinx
When Castletown defeated Wolfe Tones after a replay in the All-County A League Div. 2 final late last year they must have really started to believe that 2005 would be their year and that an eagerly-awaited Intermediate Football Championship title was just around the corner. By Paul Clarke.
2004
Castletown finish on a high
While Wolfe Tones enjoyed a wonderful 2004, adding the Meath Intermediate Football Championship to the county, provincial and national junior successes of the previous year, neighbours Castletown also had cause for celebrations, after a thrilling triumph in the Division 2 FL.
2003
Castletown stun by five goal salvo
Castletown's dream of winning the Intermediate Football Championship was shattered on a damp August evening in Moynalty when Carnaross finished strongly to eliminate Liam Clarke's side at the quarter-final stage. But three underage titles auger well for the future.
2002
Castletown look to next year
One thing immediately strikes you about Liam Clarke; his utter belief in the Castletown team he captained this year is thoroughly unquenchable. The north Meath club failed to make an impact on the 2002 Intermediate Football Championship, but Liam is adamant that a breakthrough to the senior ranks is within reach.
2001
‘Town but not out
Castletown's angst at missing out on a place in the blue riband intermediate football decider in the past year and on promotion from division two to boot is made bearable for the likes of stalwart clubman Johnny Duffy by a swift analysis of the potential that's inherent in the club.
2000
King of the Castle
A disappointing championship year for Castletown was salvaged when the club went on to gain promotion to Division Two. Captain James McConnell hopes the higher standard of league football will provide the springboard for a stronger challenge on the championship front.
1999
Kings of the Castle
After a lacklustre summer for the club's intermediate side, there was some consolation for Castletown Gaels when the Under 16s claimed the Division 3 title with a victory over Clann na Gael in July. A selector on that team was Colm Smyth, who speaks about the club's year.
1998
The future beckons
Royal County charts Castletown's impressive run in the 1997 U21 special competition which culminated in a final victory over Kilmainhamwood.
   

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Clann na nGael
2011

Hurlers can bounce back
Having spent the last four years in the senior ranks, it was generally felt that Clann na nGael had established themselves in the top flight, but given the competitive nature of the hurling championship in Meath, nothing is a certainty as the Athboy/Rathcairn outfit found out to their detriment this year.

2010
Work in progress
Clann na nGael hurlers have cemented their place in the senior ranks over the past few years and the days of bouncing to and fro from the intermediate ranks seem a distant memory.
2009
Mission accomplished
For the past number of years Clann na nGael hurlers had earned the reputation of being a yoyo team in that they bounced from intermediate and senior on an almost annual basis. However, they cemented their place in the top flight last year, and they can now lay claim to be one of the best in the county, having reached the quarter-finals in 2009.
2008
A happy Clann
The 2008 campaign was an intriguing one for the Clann na nGael hurlers as they made their return to the senior ranks following last yearÕs success in the intermediate championship. However, the club has found itself in this situation all too often in recent years and the main emphasis during the season was to retain their senior status.
2007
Junior champions
When Clann na nGael captured the Meath JFC title on the first Sunday of October last, the success was only the third for a team from the Athboy parish. Fifty years earlier the name Athboy went on the championship roll of honour and in 1969 Martinstown won outright honours.
2006
On both fronts
Clann na nGael footballers have established themselves as a decent junior ÔA' team and as this year's results in the championship prove, they are not to far away from competing at the business end of the campaign.
2005
Hurlers achieve their goal
Clann na nGael hurlers set out with the aim of maintaining their senior status during the course of the 2005 SHC and experienced player Eamon Clancy admitted that their performances during the campaign came about due to hard work and determination.
2004
Return to senior ranks
Following the disappointment and surprise of losing the 2003 Intermediate hurling final, Clann na nGael made no mistake in returning to the senior ranks for next year with a well earned win over Gaeil Colmcille in this year's decider.
2003
A new beginning
A new club was born in the Royal County in 2003 when An Gaeltacht (Rath Cairn) joined forces with Athboy to give rise to Clann na nGael. It was an historic development and the club set about its tasks accordingly.

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Clonard
2011
Clonard claim championship honours
Five years after they experienced the bitter pain of losing the final, Clonard were celebrating when they clinched the Junior B FC title in style.
2010
Young guard starting to filter through in Clonard
Making a return to the Junior B Football Championship final is proving a tall order for Clonard but the emergence of new players at adult level is starting to pay dividends. By Paul Clarke.Ê
2009
A coming force
Clonard's ongoing efforts to win the Junior B Football Championship continue to meet with frustration, but there's no denying that the work being carried out at under age level in the club has the potential to reap rich rewards at adult level in the future. By Paul Clarke.
2008
37-year drought comes to an end
Getting back to the Junior B Championship final was the primary aim for Clonard at the start of the year and while that may not have been achieved, that disappointment was put to one side as the club ended a 37-year wait for adult silverware when they claimed the Division 5FL title.
2007
Quarter-final exit for Clonard
After a highly progressive year in 2006, Clonard must have been more than hopeful that '07 would bring silverware in the shape of the Larry Kearns Memorial Cup that goes to the winners of the Junior B Football Championship.
2006
So close
While disappointed to lose out to St. Brigid's in the junior ÔB' championship decider, Clonard can still take a great deal of encouragement from their progress this year according to club stalwart and selector Leonard Farrell.
2005
Clonard juveniles come of age
Clonard are celebrating one of their greatest years, following an unprecedented run of success at juvenile level. By mid-summer, three juvenile titles had already been garnered in the form of U14 league Division Four, U14 championship Division Three and U12 league Division Four Ð a hefty harvest by any standards and, fingers crossed, the beginning of a brave new era for this proud Meath GAA outpost.
2004
It's ‘ard at times
Clonard missed out on a quarter-final slot in the Junior ‘B' Football Championship by the slenderest of margins, going out on scoring difference to St. Paul's. Frank Hevey reviewed the year.
2003
Recalling the big days
Back in the winter of 1993 Niall Walsh's mind was surely still tuned in to an amazing year that culminated in a never to be forgotten appearance in an All-Ireland Minor Football Championship final with Meath on the hallowed turf of Croke Park.
2002
Unlucky year for Clonard
Gaelic football folk in Clonard will tell you that the game can be very cruel sometimes, and to be honest, you'd find it hard to disagree with them. Three championship wins in succession, only one defeat and still they failed to make the junior B play-offs in 2002. Sometimes football just has a way of kicking you in the teeth. Managing them this year was Ray Brennan, and he hated every minute of walking along the Clonard sideline.
2001
Underage evolution in Clonard
For the first time in nearly a decade, Clonard fielded under 10 and under 12 teams last season. Declan Twomey, who was junior ‘B' team player/manager, gives the lowdown on happenings in the south county club
2000
Work hard, Play hard, Clonard
The working hard and the playing hard are qualities that Clonard don't lack but that combination still wasn't enough to see Junior ‘B' football glory head to the small south Meath club. Chairman Joe Gannon and his fellow club members haven't given up the fight just yet though.
1999
Clonard keep their heads up
Clonard's bid to land the elusive Junior ‘B' Football Championship crown faltered at the penultimate round stage last season. Disappointment was once again the club's lot but, according to team centre forward Mark Gannon, the quest for glory will continue in 2000. .
1998
A faller at the final hurdle
Once again the gaels of Clonard were forced to endure final defeat heartbreak. Royal County talks to Manager Gerry Flanagan about the year gone by.
   

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Cortown
2011
Cleary predicts Cortown upturn
Cortown may be down at the moment but they are certainly not out according to team selector Con Cleary, who has given tremendous service to the Bohermeen parish club since joining them from Kilmacud Crokes nearly a decade ago.
2010
Injuries hamper CortownÕs stride
Cortown have certainly experienced the ups and downs of Intermediate Championship football since their decade of life in the top flight was terminated in 2006 and this year brought a mixture of disappointment and relief. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Knocking on the senior door
After being beaten finalists in the IFC in 2008, Cortown were unable to progress as far in the race for the Mattie McDonnell Cup and after finishing in third place in their group, getting to the quarter-finals proved beyond them. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Loads of pride and determination
Two years after being relegated from Meath footballÕs premier ranks, Cortown were knocking at the senior door last autumn but they were refused re-entry as parish neighbours St UltanÕs found the right key in the Lagan Group IFC final.
2007
No double drop for Cortown
The almost unthinkable must have been going through the minds of everybody associated with the Cortown club as they made their way to Bective on the fourth Saturday of September this year - one more defeat and they had lost another life in their struggle to avoid a second championship relegation in the space of a year.
2006
Relegation heartache
For the last decade, Cortown have defied their critics and maintained their status in the senior ranks, however that all came to an end after defeat to Kilmainhamwood in this year's relegation play-off.
2005
Coyne proves his worth
Having scaled the heights of a SFC quarter-final against Skryne in 2004, Cortown experienced contrasting fortunes in '05. This time around, they failed to make an impact in the premier knockout competition, plummeting into a relegation play-off before retaining their senior status courtesy of a comfortable victory over Ballinlough. Centre back and captain David ÔSkipper' Coyne - a steadying influence all year Ð reflects on a topsy-turvy year for the boys in green.
2004

Cortown just won't give up
For a club representing a small area in the west end of Bohermeen parish, Cortown have done remarkably well since making their debut in the Meath Senior Football Championship in 1997.

2003
Fighting to the last
Just what it means to hold onto your hard-earned senior status was glaringly apparent at Pairc Tailteann in mid-August when Cortown secured the precious point that guaranteed their survival in the premier grade.
2002
Bubbling under
Cortown endured a Jekyll and Hyde season in 2002. They came within a whisker of regaining their division one league status, yet found themselves embroiled in senior championship relegation trouble at the tail end of the season. Club secretary Pat Keane attempts to unravel the enigma.
2001
Smitten by all things Cortown
The world and his mother know that Cortown are a coming outfit. However, the problem for 40-something club stalwart Francis Smyth is that the talked-about blue riband success for the one-time division five club can't come quickly enough.
2000
Life is a rollercoaster
It's been an eventful five years for Cortown and Gordon Codd, as Royal County reports. Cortown are about as predictable as the weather ... you just never know what's coming next. Just when you think you've got them sussed, they carpetbomb all rationale with a bewildering move, rendering the bemused onlooker dizzy, speechless and sometimes hurt.
1999
Optimism in Cortown
Expectations have heightened so much in Cortown that last season's senior championship exit at the quarter-final stage was considered a disappointment. Confident that further improvements will be made in the coming year is stalwart defender Liam Rennicks.
1998
Cortown's Meehan with destiny
Johnny Meehan, an All-Ireland medal winner in 1949, a founder member of Cortown and as good an interviewee as our man Royal County has come across.
   

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Curraha
2011
Best in a decade
Along with Navan OÕMahonyÕs, Curraha were the surprise packets of this yearÕs JFC after they reached the knockout stages for the first time since their Matthew Ginnity Cup winning year of 2001. Vice-chairman and underage coach Pat Moriarty took a great deal of encouragement from their run to the semi-final and is hoping there is more to come in the next couple of years.
2010
Reserve respite for Curraha
Curraha were unfortunate to be drawn in the toughest group of the Junior Football Championship and despite a valiant attempt they failed to progress to the knockout stages, but the club was reimbursed with the B FL Division 7 title in October.
2009
A new face
The opening of their new clubhouse in late August was a massive occasion for the Curraha club, but unfortunately the Junior Football Championship proved less successful, though they did fare considerably better in Division 5 of the A League. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Plenty to be proud of
Curraha GFC was justifiably proud of the major role their own Pat Coyle played in the success of the Meath minor football team in 2008, while Mark Battersby, who plays at under-age level for St Vincent's/Curraha, was a key forward on the side which enjoyed a summer to remember.
2007
A real buzz in Curraha
After going close to reaching the business end of the Junior Football Championship last year Curraha probably had grounds for optimism as they prepared for the start of the battle for the Matthew Ginnity Cup in 2007.
2006
Crisp football
Five years after their exciting victory in the Meath Junior Football Championship, Curraha celebrated a more modest triumph last October when taking Division 5 FL title with a final win over Drumree at Dunshaughlin.
2005
Youth the key at Curraha
Curraha set their stall out to steady the ship after being relegated from the Intermediate Football Championship and losing their Div. 3 League status in 2004. Club secretary Paul O'Connor reviewed the year.
2004
Mood is good
Curraha might have suffered relegation from the intermediate ranks in 2004, but the mood in the club remains upbeat and positive as they look to the future, happy in the knowledge that they have good under-age structures in place which should sustain them in the years ahead.
2003
Curraha's juvenile fairytale continues
There are many success stories contained in Royal County 2003, but few can match that of Curraha, whose exploits at juvenile level are nothing short of phenomenal.
2002
Carroll on regardless
Eoin Carroll played a primary role in bringing the junior championship to Curraha in 2001. This year he and his teammates made the treacherous step up to intermediate football and survived.
2001
Curraha's best
Making the most of your resources is what every club strives to achieve. In this respect, the gaels of Curraha set the standard in 2001 by maximising their potential and winning the junior football championship title. We look back on their campaign.
2000
Curraha's man from the Kingdom
With Brian Stafford staying on for his second season as trainer, Curraha named a new manager to work alongside him at the beginning of last season. He was Pat Moriarty, a Kerry man who's been involved with the club since 1995 having moved up from the Kingdom. In Kerry Pat played with Templenoe, the club of the Spillane brothers, Pat, Tom and Mick
1999
McManus of Curraha is ‘Special'
Ian McManus has represented the county at minor, U21, junior and senior levels. Needless to say the Curraha club are proud of his achievements to date. It's players like him who provide much optimism for the club's future.
1998
Climbing the ladder
After a glorious Junior B triumph 12 months ago, the season past can be looked upon as the calm after the storm for Curraha. We reflect on the present and future of the club, and one of the characters that make it.
   

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Donaghmore/Ashbourne
2011
A busy year as ever for Donaghmore/Ashbourne
The last Donaghmore/Ashbourne adult fixture for 2011 ended on a positive note, with the arrival in Killegland West of the Joseph ÔJunieÕ Dillon Cup, on the 12th of November. It joined the camogie intermediate trophy, which the ladies won after losing the 2010 final. Our Intermediate and Junior ÕBÕ hurlers reached their respective semi-finals, with the senior lady footballers reaching the championship quarter-final and the Feis Cup semi-final.
2010
A great season for Donaghmore/Ashbourne
As we come to the end of another season, and reflect back on the status of adult football within the club the term Òsteady progressÓ could sum up our year. We havenÕt made that all important breakthrough in the quest to obtain Keegan Cup glory, but overall we are going in the right direction.
2009
Depleted Donaghmore/Ashbourne keep heads above water
Maximum points from their last two outings in Group A ensured Donaghmore/Ashbourne werenÕt dragged into a relegation dogfight in the SFC but David Jennings looks back on how the year could have been more fruitful had injuries to vital players not hampered their progress.
2008
From strength to strength
When a definitive history of Donaghmore Ashbourne GAA Club is finally compiled, 2008 will certainly be regarded as one of the milestones in the clubÕs history, writes Michael Doherty.
2007
Breakthrough made
For the first time in 48 years we have finally put our name in the hat with the big boys in Meath GAA. And what a year we had, as we claimed the Mattie McDonnell Cup and the Division 3A league all within six days of each other. In addition to this our Minor team reclaimed the minor championship for the second year in a row and off the field we are only weeks away from moving into our new complex in Killegland. Things are going from strength to strength for Donaghmore Ashbourne and our season's review is as follows:
2006

Ladies Football
Although we did not manage to bring home as much silverware as in previous years, 2006 saw our ladies football section continues to go from strength to strength. Almost all of our teams were still in action when it came to semi final and final stages and the season overview went as follows:

Hurling
The adult hurling team had a great start to the season as their first official outing of the year saw them bring home their first silverware since 1994. The St Patrick's weekend saw them play Blackhall Gaels in the 2005 Grade 1 Hurling league final in Ratoath.

On the march
Although our early season targets had to be raised higher mid way through the season our adult football season ended in a disappointing manner over two consecutive weekends at Seneschalstown.

2005
Donaghmore land Junior C honours
A club representing one of the largest population bases in the Royal County ended a long wait for an adult football championship title when Donaghmore/Ashbourne captured outright honours in the Junior C FC on the last Sunday of August with an emphatic 3-13 to 0-4 final victory over St Colmcille's at Pairc Tailteann.

Club Review
Every January, clubs throughout the Country are filled with high expectations as they look forward to the coming GAA season.

Underage Football
At underage level the club continues to go from strength to strength.
2004
The promise of Killegland West
Anybody returning to the Ashbourne area these days after a reasonably prolonged period away would undoubtedly be astonished at the vast amount of house-building that has taken place in a region that, not that very long ago, would have been termed no more than a small town.
2003
U14 ‘a' championship for Donaghmore/Ashbourne
On the many occasions that Derry, Tyrone, Armagh, Louth and Donegal supporters passed through the village of Ashbourne, some would have wondered if there was a football team in the area.
2002
Plenty of apples in the basket
Donaghmore/Ashbourne GAA Club certainly aren't lacking in ambition and plan to tap into the potential that a rapidly growing population offers in their area.
2001
Tormey toasts a great year
Donaghmore/Ashbourne will be rubbing shoulders with the ‘big boys' in Division 1 of the All County Football league next year on the back of a yet another memorable promotion campaign. Team manager Conor Tormey believes that defeat in the League final at the hands of Navan O'Mahony's didn't detract from a great year.
2000
Hungry to dispel notion
Having failed once again to make an impact in the Intermediate championship, Donaghmore/Ashbourne have reinforced the notion that they are a club unable to reproduce their best league form in the most important competition.
1999
Rising up the ranks
Donaghmore/Ashbourne's ascent up the All-County Leagues continued unabated in 1999 but they failed to transfer their league form onto the championship arena. The team's centre forward PJ Moran takes a look back at the last twelve months.
1998
‘Moore success
1998 saw Donaghmore-Ashbourne lift their first adult trophy in 27 years. Our special correspondent reviews the year.
   

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Drumbaragh
2011
Connolly eager to make amends
In recent years, the Drumbaragh club have been annually tipped as one of the teams that could win the junior 'A' football championship and they have consistently reached the knockout stages. However, their form eluded them this year and they were disappointed to be out of the championship very early. Talented forward James Connolly spoke to the Royal County about the 2011 campaign and stressed that the Drums would be back stronger than ever next year.
2010
Consistent Drums just need that lucky break
Drumbaragh have been regular qualifiers for the closing stages of the Meath JFC over the last six years but in 2010 they fell at the quarter-final stage for the fourth time during that frustrating period.
2009
More than holding their own
Drumbaragh reached the semi-finals of the Junior Football Championship for the first time since they returned to the grade in 1999, but there was disappointment when Longwood turned in a brilliant second half performance to end their interest in the competition. By Paul Clarke.
2008
League champions
After being eliminated at the last eight stage in the previous three Junior Football Championship campaigns Drumbaragh had an obvious desire to break the quarter-final jinx in 2008, but instead they failed to advance from the group stages after losing two of their matches but still held their nerve to claim a famous Division 4 FL title win.
2007
Waiting to break the quarter-final jinx
Drumbaragh are finding the quarter-final hurdle very difficult to clear as they continue their pursuit of the Junior Football Championship title. For the third successive year they were eliminated at the last eight stage and how it hurt as St. Brigid's edged them out by a point after extra-time.
2006
Knocking on the door
For the second year running Drumbaragh exited the Junior Football Championship at the quarter-final stage, but departing player-manager Christy Carry believes the club has what it takes to lift the Matthew Ginnity Cup in the not to distant future.
2005
Drums keep on rolling
Drumbaragh GFC have just completed another year's competition which saw them reach the quarter-finals of the Junior 'A' championship. Although defeat there to Kilmainham was a disappointment, club secretary Barry Monaghan believes there are many positives to take from 2005.
2004
Carry on Drumbaragh
Drumbaragh may not be big, but it's a place with great expectations. On the field this year those expectations went unfulfilled. And it hurts.
2003
Drumbaragh had big hopes
On the back of Drumbaragh's 2002 Div.3 under 21 success, the club had high hopes of being involved in the business end of the Junior A championship in 2003. Instead they found themselves embroiled in a relegation play-off at the tail end of the season. Stalwart Christopher Carry reviewed the year.
2002
Glory days in the making
The glory days of 1999 are a distant memory now in Drumbaragh, after a third successive year of failing to qualify from the group stages in the Junior A championship.
2001
It's in the blood!
Joe Smith is the archetypal gael. He's imbued with an inherent love of Gaelic football and, in terms of service, he's given two score years and more to the GAA. Like his late father Terry, his first allegiance is to Drumbaragh though.
2000
Murtagh leads Drumbaragh revival
The mini-revival sparked by Finian Murtagh's arrival at Drumbaragh was temporarily halted when they lost to Curraha at the play-off stage of this season's Junior A championship. Next season, they have the chance to put things right.
1999
The drums beat
The year 2000 will see Drumbaragh Emmetts grace the Junior A championship, a fitting reward for their dedicated efforts.Drumbaragh are Meath Junior B champions for 1999 and there will be no better winners than the emerging north Meath outfit.
1998
Carry on the Faith
Paidin Carry was one of Drumbaragh's finest and was most unlucky not to have won major honours with Meath. Royal County talks with a GAA ‘character.'
   

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Drumconrath
2011
Drums remain positive
DrumconrathÕs long-serving treasurer Stephen McKenna insists there is light at the end of the tunnel for the north Meath club, despite their failure to win a championship game for the third successive year.
2010
New blood is the key for Drumconrath
These are tough times for Drumconrath and after their demotion from the Intermediate Football Championship last year they endured a very difficult first campaign in the junior grade and were thankful that the decision of Boardsmill to seek regrading meant they werenÕt required to fight it out for survival in the relegation play-offs.
2009
The visit to junior could be a short one
Just three years after they contested the Intermediate Championship final, Drumconrath slipped out of the grade when they lost the relegation final to Castletown and it will now be a case of regrouping in the junior ranks with the hope of better days to come. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Reds in Green and Gold
A gap of almost three decades was bridged during the summer when Terry Skelly played senior championship football for Meath, coming on as a substitute when the Royal County scored a runaway victory over Carlow in their Leinster SFC opener at Croke Park.
2007
Drums still learning
After going all the way to the IFC final in 2006, there was a shorter road in store for Drumconrath this year as they fell a couple of hurdles earlier after winning two games and losing the other two in their group.
2006
They'll be back
Drumconrath's Intermediate Football Championship campaign started with a very unsatisfactory outing against Na Fianna which was abandoned and ended on the biggest day of the year on the Meath club football scene when they suffered the huge disappointment of losing the final to Rathkenny. By Paul Clarke.
2005
Getting closer
In the past two IFC campaigns Drumconrath went close to making the knockout stages and according to Peter O'Halloran they just need a little more self-belief to make a bigger impact at this level.
2004
Drum's sound good
After struggling to make an impression in the intermediate football championship in the last couple of years, Drumconrath came within a whisker of making the last eight in 2004.
2003
McArdle remembers when
It's a very rare occurrence indeed that six brothers win Meath Championship medals on the one day in any grade, but it happened 40 years ago in 1963 when the Callans numerically dominated the St. Peter's, Drumconrath, panel that won the Junior A football competition.
2002
A life less ordinary
The streets of Seattle can be the best of places and the worst of places. But for much of 2001 they were the best of places for Drumconrath player Austin Hickey. At the age of only 21 he was the Strength and Fitness coach for the University of Washington American Football team, the Washington Huskies.
2001
Farrells Field
One of Drumconrath's longest serving and most committed members is Jody Farrell. Royal County spoke to him about his 40-year involvement with the club.
2000
Drumconrath's in good ‘Nick'
As a player, official and supporter, Nicky Callan has served Drumconrath GFC with distinction. Royal County talks to the shop proprietor about the Junior championship win of 1963, the current team's future prospects and the photographic display he organised this year to commemorate the dawn of the millennium, amongst many other things.
1999
Divided loyalties
They travelled together to the game but they were on different wavelengths. A Cork flag out one car window and a Meath one flowing from the other. Royal County spoke to Drumconrath's Peter Ludlow and his Cork wife Eileen about their differing views on the recent All-Ireland final.
1998
Two heads better than one
These are rewarding times for the underage players of Drumconrath/Meath Hill. Kevin McDonald, a selector with the victorious minor side talks to Royal County about the amalgamation's winning formula.
   

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Drumree
2011
Mission accomplished
Having surprised the hurling fraternity in Meath by winning the 2010 intermediate hurling championship, many felt that Drumree would make a swift return to the second tier, but the red and white hoops proved to their critics that they are than capable of holding their own in the top flight.
2010
Drumree hurlers back in the big time
Drumree captured the Meath Intermediate Hurling Championship for the second time in eight years when securing a dramatic victory over well-fancied Boardsmill with a late late goal in the final at St LomanÕs Park, Trim.
2009
Drumree drive on
Drumree's efforts to make an instant return to the top flight met with disappointment in 2009 when a team coached by Rathmolyon and Meath player Mickey Cole failed to advance as one of the four semi-finalists from the six-team group which made up the Intermediate Hurling Championship. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Hoping for better things to come
Members of Drumree GAA club will be happy to see the back of 2008 for a variety of reasons and will no doubt be looking forward to starting from a blank canvass in the year ahead.
2007
Drumree dwell on Ôwhat might have been'
After slipping down from the Intermediate ranks two years ago, Drumree have found it hard to make an impact in the JFC and 2007 proved to be another frustrating year for the club as they failed to progress beyond the group stages of the third tier competition.
2006
Promotion via the league
When Drumree lost the IFC relegation play-off to Slane in 2005 the great desire of all involved with the club was surely that they would make an instant return to the intermediate ranks by winning the JFC this year. But that wasn't how it turned out and instead of mounting a challenge for a quarter-final place they endured a very difficult campaign which brought no victories in the group stages and just two draws.
2005
A tough year
Despite relegation from the intermediate football ranks and an unsatisfactory exit from the senior hurling championship, all isn't bleak in Drumree according to PRO Macartan McGroder.
2004
Putting down a marker
Drumree achieved two victories against Dunderry in their first year in the Senior Hurling Championship - the first was historic, the second possibly life-saving.
2003
Historic year for Drumree
The year 2003 will long live in the memories of Drumree hurling club as they secured the rights to play in the senior hurling championship for next year.
2002
The Wonder Years
Back then it was all so different! Drumree were the nearly men of junior football in the county. Back then the match programme prior to the 1996 All-Ireland final between Meath and Mayo carried a picture profile of Evan Kelly, age 22, 5'11", 13st, one Leinster SFC.
2001
A Valiant Troy
Drumree may be better known as a football club in a county so driven by all things big ball, but the small south Meath club is making strides in hurling to match those made on the football fields over the past few summers.
2000
No dossing in Drumree
Intermediate semi-finalists in their second year in the grade, Drumree are pushing hard as forward Jimmy Walsh explains.
1999
Champions of Leinster
Drumree created history when they became the first Meath club to claim the Leinster Junior Tournament. Royal County charts their success.
1998
Destiny and Drumree
Drumree have unquest-ionably been the most consistent junior club of the 90s. However, they are junior no more. Royal County chronicles a title that nobody could begrudge the men in red and white.
   

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Duleek
2011
The great escapologists
Relief was the overriding feeling in the Duleek/Bellewstown club after a season which saw both their senior and junior ÔAÕ teams narrowly avoid relegation. While delighted that both teams held their own, secretary Joan Lenehan is hoping the green and golds wonÕt have any relegation worries next year and that they can rediscover the form which saw them reach a SFC quarter-final in 2010.
2010
D/B can beat anybody on their day
If anybody had dared to suggest before the start of the 2010 Senior Football Championship that Duleek/Bellewstown would defeat the two teams which contested the 2008 final serious questions would have been raised about their sanity. By Paul Clarke.Ê
2009
First championship honours for the newcomers
This year was a significant one for the Duleek/Bellewstown club with a first championship title being annexed since the amalgamation with the Junior B FC triumph. The first team showed mixed form, qualifying for the Division 1 League final but finishing bottom of their group in the SFC. By Noel Coogan.
2008
New boys start well
Not a lot of people expected the new Duleek/Bellewstown amalgamation to mount a significant challenge in this year's Senior Football Championship, but to their credit they warmed to the big challenge quite well, played some very good football during the group stages and advanced to the quarter-finals where Wolfe Tones ended their interest in the competition.
2007
Safety first
After a promising first campaign back in the premier grade last year, Duleek endured a difficult Senior Football Championship in 2007 which included a couple of very heavy defeats in the group stages.
2006
A match for the best
Duleek would have loved to make it through to the quarter-finals of the Senior Football Championship in their first year back in the top flight. They didn't make it, but they were still in the hunt going into the concluding series of group matches and did enough during the campaign to demonstrate without any doubt that they are fit for life in the highest grade.
2005
Welcome to senior
When Syddan bombarded the Duleek defence with wave after wave of attacks in the closing stages of the Intermediate Football Championship final replay there appeared to be a serious danger that Barney Rock's side would suffer yet another day of bitter disappointment at Pairc Tailteann.
2004
A step closer but no cigar
When Duleek eventually managed to shake off their semi-final jinx they must surely have started to really believe that 2004 was going to be their year and that they were on the verge of a return to the senior ranks.
2003
Most consistent
On the law of averages Duleek surely have to win the Intermediate Football Championship at some stage in the not too distant future.
2002
Likely winners
After going out at the semi-final stage this year, Duleek will have a special incentive to win the Meath IFC in 2003, because it marks the 25th anniversary of the club's last outright triumph in the grade.
2001
The return of Duleek
On the evidence of some swashbuckling performances in the 2001 IFC, Duleek have re-established themselves as genuine contenders. Peter Curran was outstanding in ‘01 and looks sure to be to the fore for many seasons to come.
2000
Been there, done that
Mickey Naughton knows what it's like to win an Intermediate championship as a player. It is for this reason that he is as determined as anyone to see Duleek back in the championship winners enclosure. According to the present-day selector some steps of progress was made during 2000.
1999
The only way is up
Considering the circumstances surrounding their year, Duleek did remarkably well to preserve their intermediate status in ‘99. Kenny McDonnell talks about this year and next with Royal County.
1998
A time to regroup
After three county finals in successive years, 1998 was always going to be a difficult year for Duleek. Club chairman Eugene Geraghty talks about it as a chance to catch breath, as Royal County finds out.
   

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Dunboyne

2011

Dunboyne disappointed not to go further
After reaching the SFC semi-final last year, DunboyneÕs goal for 2011 was to take the next step and contest the final. Alas, it wasnÕt to be as Robbie BrennanÕs men were knocked out at the quarter-final stage by an impressive Donaghamore/Ashbourne outfit.
2010
Definite Dunboyne improvement
Dunboyne were understandably deflated following their Senior Football Championship semi-final defeat to Skryne, but they can still look back on the 2010 campaign as one of great progress when itÕs compared to last year when they were comprehensively beaten by Wolfe Tones in a quarter-final.
2009
Dunboyne taste All-Ireland glory
The St PeterÕs Dunboyne under-14s enjoyed an all-conquering 2009, claiming the League, Championship and All-Ireland FŽile. And it was success in the latter in July, coming six years after the countyÕs previous FŽile victory, which proved most satisfying. Team selector Brian Howlin spoke to Royal County.
2008
Back on track
For much of the 1980s, St PeterÕs, Dunboyne were, in Meath hurling circles, something of a yoyo team. Intermediate titles were garnered in 1982, Õ86 and Õ89, but following those triumphs, their stay at the top table was an all too brief one, writes Brendan Boylan.
2007
Momentum comes to a shuddering halt
Beforehand, it was probably the most talked about fixture since the same two teams met at the same stage of the same competition two years previous. But, as Brendan Boylan recounts, there was no disputing the issue this time as the momentum which the Dunboyne footballers had built up mid season came to a shuddering halt as Navan O'Mahonys ran out comfortable victors in the SFC semi final.
2006
Beaten at the post
Last year, Dunboyne's senior footballers were involved in one of the most memorable conclusions to an SFC witnessed for many years, and for a variety of reasons, at the end of which they emerged with the Keegan Cup.
2005
Seven year itch comes to an end!
The Meath SFC of 2005 will be remembered for many reasons, some good and some not so good. Most important of all though will be that a youthful Dunboyne side claimed the Keegan Cup for the first time in seven years. Brendan Boylan charts their journey to glory.

Dreams are made on the M50
In January 2005 we set out along the M50 with our U16 panel for a day at the UCD sports centre. On entering the reception area we were very proud to see a fellow clubman Nigel Crawford listed on the roll of honour as a previous captain of UCD Gaelic Football Team.
2004
Seconds very much in for Dunboyne
Over the past few seasons, Dunboyne folk have suffered their fair amount of hurling heartbreak, particularly at Pairc Tailteann, but for a time on September 11th, the number one venue in the county was the scene of a glorious triumph.
2003
The wait goes on
They say good things come to those who wait, the hurling people of Dunboyne will feel that they have played more than their fair share of the waiting game, but as Brendan Boylan reports, this must again be their lot for another twelve months.
2002
Footballers show true worth at last
Dunboyne's hopes of marking their Centenary Year by winning the Senior Football Championship faltered at the semi-final stage when they lost to Trim, but Gerry Cooney's team did enough during 2002 to suggest that they aren't too far off the standard required to go all the way.
2001
From Dunboyne all the way to Australia
Thomas O'Connor is an exciting young player who made his senior debut in both codes with Dunboyne in 2001. Brendan Boylan talks to the teenager who also represented Ireland in Australia during the course of the season.
2000
Dunboyne claim epic U16 win
210 minutes of football were required before Dunboyne finally took the U16 FC crown. Without doubt, the most exciting county final of 2000 was the u-16 clash between St Peter's, Dunboyne and Navan O'Mahony's. Three games, plus two periods of extra-time, were required to decide the destination of the Benny Caffrey cup and, in the end, it was Dunboyne who prevailed.
1999
Boylan's latest press release
It's three years since Brendan Boylan was elected PRO of St. Peter's, Dunboyne. There's been no shortage of championship successes to report on since and the affable Boylan is enjoying every minute of it.
1998
Dunboyne crowned champions
Ten years ago Dunboyne were a junior club but now they are kingpins of Meath. Royal County takes a look at a championship winning season borne out of quality football.
   

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Dunderry
2011
League consolation for Dunderry
In a year when their intermediate football and hurling teams both faltered in the latter stages of the championship, Dunderry claimed a B League Division 3 football title and the Division 2 HL at adult level. Long-serving dual player Kevin Dowd shares his recollections on the year.
2010
Semi-final fence proves a difficult hurdle
It was another year of regrets for Dunderry as they bowed out of both the IFC and IHC at the semi-final stages, losing out to Nobber and Boardsmill in the respective penultimate round ties.
2009
Pining for the top table!
In the years since their exit from the senior ranks, Dunderry have enjoyed mixed form. Things seem to be coming together for them as 2009 saw them among the favourities for IFC honours. By Brendan Boylan.

2008

No place like home
Wicklow native Con OÕNeill earned his managerial stripes under Colm OÕRourke as a selector on the Simonstown team that reached two SFC finals in 2003 and 2004 but he now calls Dunderry home and, after taking over the reigns of the local clubÕs intermediate side in 2008, was bitterly disappointed when, for the second year running, they exited the IFC at the quarter-final stage. By Shane OÕBrien.
2007
Progress on and off the field
Dunderry GAA Club has steadily been putting the structures in place which will hopefully secure a bright future and a look at their impressive new clubhouse offers enough evidence that they are going in the right direction.
2006
Finding their feet again
Just after Dunderry were relegated from senior football ranks in the autumn of 2005 when losing to Kilmainhamwood in the final play-off at Kells, one of their players boldly predicted that they would go back up at the first attempt. By Noel Coogan.
2005
A decade on
Fifteen years after finally emerging from the intermediate ranks Dunderry returned to that grade in 2005 when their battle for survival in the SFC ended in bitter disappointment as they lost to Kilmainhamwood in the relegation decider at Kells in late October.
2004
A mixed bag
The Dunderry club can look back on a mixed 2004. Their senior footballers and senior hurlers both found themselves embroiled in relegation play-offs with the latter dropping down to intermediate ranks.
2003
Big plans
Dunderry GAA Club are looking very much to the future as they embark on an ambitious clubhouse development plan which has a hoped-for completion date of December, 2004.
2002
Transition time
Tommy Dowd's fabulous intercounty football career, which brought so much pleasure for Meath supporters during the 1990s, may be over. But one of the county's most popular and wholehearted players of all time proved in 2002 that he can still do the business at club level.
2001
Dunderry - the epitome of a great dual club
In 1988 when the Dunderry club officially opened their grounds former chairman Tommy McCormack contributed an article, at the end of which he expressed the wish “that in the near future senior status be attained in both codes.”
2000
Kelly to the rescue
Junior B success more than made up for senior heartbreak as Dunderry delivered yet more championship success to the parish.
1999
At the cutting edge
The wheels on Dunderry's bid to capture their second ever Keegan Cup crown came unstuck at the semi-final stage when Dunshaughlin upset the odds to knock them out of contention. Midfielder Stephen O'Rourke looks back on a disappointing 1999 and forward to what he, and all of Dunderry, hopes will be a profitable 2000.
1998
Hip Hip ... Hooray
The U21 footballers of Dunderry made amends for the club's minor final defeat when they got the better of Simonstown to clinch the championship.
   

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Dunsany
2011
Tailteann Cup and JFC D success buoys Dunsany
While the big goal was the junior championship and that failed to materialize, there was plenty to be positive about when the 2011 season came to an end for Dunsany. Despite reaching the knockout stages of the JFC for the 13th time in 14 years, the Matthew Ginnity Cup seems no closer than before. They did, however, have the consolation of becoming the inaugural winners of the Tailteann Cup, defeating Curraha in the delayed 2010 final in the early part of the year and also added the JFC D title on the first Sunday of November.
2010
Dunsany just wonÕt give up
DunsanyÕs quest for the elusive Meath JFC title goes on after they again fell short in the race for the Matthew Ginnity Cup. Over the last 13 years the clubÕs first team has reached the closing stages 12 times and got to the junior final three times but in 2010 Ballinabrackey ended hopes at the penultimate stage.
2009
Final woe wonÕt continue forever
For the third time in eight years, Dunsany left Pairc Tailteann as a dejected group after going down to a defeat in the Meath Junior Football Championship final as their attempt to take the title for the first time fell short.
2008
Oh so close
Dunsany resumed normal service as far as consistency was concerned in the 2008 Junior Football Championship, but that much sought after title remains as elusive as ever after they were beaten by Ratoath at the semi-final stage.
2007
No ten in a row for Dunsany
Consistency had been the hallmark of Dunsany's life in the Junior Football Championship for the best part of a decade, but a trend was broken in 2007 when they failed to reach the knockout stages and so their dream of a breakthrough in the grade goes on.
2006
Nine and not out
If trophies were handed out for consistency, Dunsany would have collected a cabinet full of them in recent years. When they got the better of St. Vincent's in the sixth round of group matches in the 2006 Junior Football Championship it represented the ninth successive year that they advanced to the business end of the title race.
2005
The door won't open
They keep knocking, but the door seems increasingly reluctant to open. Dunsany have been one of the most consistent teams in the Junior Football Championship in recent years, yet that much sought after title remains frustratingly elusive and their supporters must be starting to wonder if it will ever arrive. By Paul Clarke.
2004
Trying to break the hoodoo
Just when it looked as if it would be 'third time lucky' for Dunsany in the Junior Football Championship, Ratoath spoiled the party when proving too good for the side in red and white in the title decider.
2003
Close but just not close enough
Following the bitter disappointment of losing the final to Nobber the previous year, Dunsany wanted to bounce back quickly and win the Junior Football Championship in 2003.
2002
Getting ever closer
Dunsany's hopes of winning the Junior Football Championship grew as the 2002 campaign progressed, but they met with disappointment at the last hurdle when a very talented Nobber side deservedly got the better of them in the final at Pairc Tailteann.
2001
Ferguson looks forward to that elusive breakthrough
Dunsany is a club with a lot going for itself. Good grounds, top-notch facilities and a crop of young football talent which has the potential to end the club's barren years. One player looking to the future with confidence is Emmet Ferguson.
2000
Dunsany's big year
Pairc na nGael, Dunsany ... a huge addition to the GAA's facilities in Meath. Football and hurling clubs throughout the country celebrated the arrival of the new Millennium in many different ways...some won championships and others organised special events. It is arguable that Dunsany GFC celebrated in the most appropriate manner possible...by staging the Official Opening of their grounds...Pairc na nGael.
1999
Another league title for Dunsany
Two successive league crowns for Dunsany show the true worth of the red and whites. Championship glory cannot be far away.
1998
Alive and kicking
Dunsany juvenile football awoke from its slumber in 1998. Will that spell a revival in the adult team's fortunes? Royal County asked the questions. Under 14 manager and club vice-chairman, Mick Ryan, was only too willing to provide the answers.
   

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Dunshaughlin
2011
So close to SFC glory
For a team which was completely overlooked when the predictions were being bandied about back in the spring, Dunshaughlin made a remarkable input to the 2011 Senior Football Championship and came agonisingly close to claiming the Keegan Cup for the fourth time.
2010
Three one-point losses halt Ônew lookÕ Dunshaughlin
After dominating the Meath SFC in the first three years of the 21st century, Dunshaughlin are now trying to climb back up the football ladder with a new wave of talent. 2010 will be remembered for a series of one-point championship losses which meant they claimed just one win from their five group outings. By Noel Coogan.
2009
The boys Dun good
In their first year as a single entity in the Minor Football Championship, Dunshaughlin broke the stranglehold enjoyed by south Meath rivals Donaghmore/Ashbourne. TP Toolan, a member of the championsÕ four-strong management team, spoke to Royal County.
2008
A sting in the tail
The man who guided Dunshaughlin to so much success in the early years of this decade masterminded their elimination from this year's Senior Football Championship when they lost to Blackhall Gaels at the quarter-final stage after cruising through the group campaign with four wins from as many outings.
2007
Kings of the knock-out
Last year, Dunshaughlin missed out on the knockout stages of the senior football championship for the first time since 1998, this year there was a discernable improvement as Leo Turley's charges topped Group A of the revamped SFC with four wins from five starts. By Liam O'Rourke.
2006
Draws provide little comfort
Dunshaughlin's Meath SFC title treble triumph in the first three years of the new century added an exciting new chapter to the Keegan Cup competition. But how things have changed since that golden period for the black and amber brigade and in 2006 a place in the closing phase eluded them for the first time since 1998. By Noel Coogan.
2005
Charlie's charges just miss out
Given the changes to the squad in recent years many might expect Dunshaughlin to struggle. That certainly hasn't been the case as Paul Clarke explains.
2004
A worthy hall of fame winner
There could hardly have been a more popular and merited recipient of the Dunshaughlin GFC Hall of Fame Award than John O'Sullivan who has given approximately half a century of the most dedicated work on behalf of a club which has risen to tremendous heights in terms of success over more recent years.
2003
No regrets
Just after seeing Dunshaughlin fail in their bid to land the 1999 Meath SFC title as Skryne won the final with seven points to spare, losing manager Eamon Barry remarked of his charges: "This team is mainly a young side and there is a sound foundation to build on. Dunshaughlin football should have a bright future."
2002
Dunshaughlin join all time greats
Every so often, something or somebody comes along and does something that will assure them of a place in history. Istabraq, DJ Carey, Maurice Fitzgerald and Tony McCoy are just some of the sporting characters that will be remembered in years to come as being a bit better than all their respective fellow stars.
2001
Final justification
Just to prove that their inaugural senior championship was earned and not given, Dunshaughlin cast any of their scattered doubters into silence by retaining their title in 2001.
2000
Champions
With a performance of textbook football Dunshaughlin became the latest name to be put on the Keegan Cup. Royal County looks at their winning year.
1999
The surprise packets of 1999...
Two years ago the Dunshaughlin club were celebrating a long awaited Intermediate championship success, this year they came to within sixty minutes of landing Meath football's blue riband prize.
1998
The boys are back in town
Senior football returned to the ever-expanding town of Dunshaughlin in 1998. How did they adapt? Royal County finds out.
   

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Enfield
2000
amalgamated with Baconstown
1999
Enfield's luck is out
Enfield's year was summed up when a late goal resulted in their exit from the Junior Football Championship at the quarter-final stage. Here, club stalwart Jim Barrett talks to Royal County about where things went wrong and how they might be rectified in the future.
1998
It's in the Genes
Gene Greville has been Enfield's latest contribution to Royal County underage teams. Here he talks to Royal County about the current state of play in the south Meath club and his career to date in the green and gold jersey.
   

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Gaeil Colmcille
2011
League win eases IFC final loss
Losing the IFC final in late September represented a huge disappointment for the Gaeil Colmcille club, but the players were rewarded for their commitment and consistency when they claimed the A League Division 3 title three weeks later.
2010
Bringing through the next generation
GAA clubs have placed a greater emphasis on their underage structures in recent years as the need to bring younger players through to adult level was greater than ever.
2009
Gaeils cause a stir
The decision to play the Meath minor hurling championship at the start of the year was one that the Gaeil Colmcille club will not be arguing over as the North Meath side lifted the premier title for the first time in 15 years when they defeated Kilmessan in the final.
2008
Back with the big boys
The day was much the same weather-wise as approximately a year earlier, but this time Gaeil Colmcille were singing in the rain at the end of the 2008 Intermediate Hurling Championship final.
2007
Closing in on the top flight
When Gaeil Colmcille went on a successful revenge mission to nearby Ballinlough in the fourth round of the 2007 Intermediate Football Championship they must have started to believe that this might just be their year and that a first outright triumph in the grade since 1986 was within reach.
2006
Real potential
When Gaeil Colmcille suffered heavy defeats in their opening two matches of the group stages of the Intermediate Hurling Championship it looked odds-on that they were in for a repeat of their 2005 campaign and a battle to hold onto their status in the second tier.
2005
A matter of pride
Most of the time, it simply comes down to pride in the jersey, pride in the club. Gaeil Colmcille are a big club. But as 2006 dawns the Kells outfit remains an enigma, a fish out of water. By Gordon Manning.
2004
No complaints as Kells do down
It had been on the cards a while … and so it came to pass in 2004 that Gaeil Colmcille finally surrendered their senior status, much to the obvious disappoint-ment of key forward Simon Cahill.
2003
Murphy's law
It's a sunny August afternoon in Kells and the pungent smell of freshly cut grass drifts through the melting streets. Joe Murphy sits back and smiles. Back in 1966 he and his Gaeil Colmcille colleagues embarked on a memorable adventure in the SFC. At the end of their crusade they were paraded through these streets as kings.
2002
One fine day
In the end it didn't really matter! Gaeil Colmcille's senior footballers had just outplayed and outclassed Dunboyne in the opening round of the 2002 championship. They had become contenders, genuine contenders. However an inexplicably beleaguered performance followed against a struggling Summerhill side and their first round heroics had suddenly been cancelled out. Gaeil Colmcille had enjoyed one fine day, but it was short lived. They had crushed Goliath but been slaughtered by David.
2001
Flanagans Ball
Meath's All-Ireland SFC title-winning celebrations of 1954 may not have been the original of the species but they were enjoyed to the full nonetheless by gaels across the Royal County - none more so indeed than by former county player of the time Bernard Flanagan.
2000
Something to ‘Smile' about
Gaeil Colmcille narrowly avoided relegation to the intermediate ranks for the second year running so they'll be hoping that it won't be a case of third time unlucky in 2001. Long serving forward Paul Smith should be fully recovered from a knee injury which restricted his involvement in the recent campaign to a mere supporter and is hoping to enjoy better fortunes in the year ahead.
1999
A Tower of strength
It's been a while since the Round Towers juvenile club have had a championship success to celebrate but, this year, their U12s set the record straight, by cruising to the U12 Division 1 title.
1998
The Colmcille Clan
A footballer and hurler of unquestionable pedigree, Conor Ferguson holds strong views on Gaelic near and far.
   

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Kilbride
2011
Kilbride keep the faith
While John Bruton has seen more lows than highs in his 10 years as a Kilbride footballer, the desire to emulate his father Pat by winning a junior championship medal with the Dublin-border club still burns brightly.
2010
ItÕs a numbers game for Kilbride
Fifty years after winning the Meath JFC title for the one and only time in the clubÕs history, the present day junior footballers of Kilbride were unable to equal the heroic deeds of their predecessors of half a century ago. By Noel Coogan.
2009
Keeping the flame burning brightly
This time 40 years ago Kilbride had just completed the first leg of their great hat-trick of victories in the Meath Senior Football Championship, but four decades later their ambitions were less lofty as the club looked back on a junior campaign which failed to deliver knockout football and a big struggle in the league.
2008
Promotion
Kilbride may have ended their Junior Football Championship campaign with a heavy quarter-final defeat, but they can certainly look back on 2008 as a progressive year which suggested that they can look forward to the future with renewed optimism following their promotion in the league.
2007
Late show
This time 40 years ago Kilbride were Senior Football champions and had provided a brilliant full-back to the Meath team that brought the county its third All-Ireland SFC title.
2006
Getting closer all the time
There were definite signs during the 2006 Junior Football Championship campaign that Kilbride might be getting nearer to a stage where they will make a serious challenge for honours in the grade as they won five of their seven group matches to qualify for a preliminary quarter-final where they bowed out of the title race against Drumbaragh.
2005
Back on track
It's over 40 years now since Kilbride arrived on the scene with a bang to establish themselves as the undisputed kingpins of Meath football.
2004
No longer the yo-yo boys
Despite being less than a dozen miles from our country's capital city, Kilbride had yet to experience the population surge that has boosted the fortunes of neighbouring clubs in recent years.
2003
Bright sparks
Kilbride Football Club possesses a highly successful and proud past and, with an eye on the future, they are very optimistic that further glory will come to them in the years ahead.
2002
Kilbride's Islander
Sometimes we all end up in the strangest places. Sometimes we open our car door and step out into the last village or town we ever intended to set foot. Sometimes fate plays its trump card and intervenes with our plans. Sometimes along life's dusty highway we take a wrong turn, and it turns out for the best. Sometimes.
2001
Twin-track approach
All belonging to Kilbride GFC are hell-bent on maintaining a twin-pronged approach to achieving progress within Meath's Gaelic games arena. The past year saw that very policy work to a tee.
2000

Kilbride deserves a Pat on the back
Recent times have been difficult for the ever enthusiastic gaels of Kilbride but there is light at the end of the tunnel as Royal County found out when it spoke to club secretary Pat Donnellan. There were many encouraging signs during 2000 to suggest a bright future for the south Meath club.

1999

Big Martin
In 1998 the Kilbride club celebrated its Golden Jubilee and memories of their five Keegan Cup wins in the sixties and early seventies came flooding back. Royal County talked to Martin Quinn about the good aul' days and the current state of play in the Dublin border club.

1998

The Golden times of Kilbride
This year Kilbride celebrated their Golden Jubilee, and they did it in style with festivities aplenty and promotion to Division Four of the league. Royal County chronicles the story.

   

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Kildalkey
2011
Three-in-a-row for champs Kildalkey
For a club which previously found it so difficult to get over the winning line in the battle for the Jubilee Cup itÕs extraordinary that Kildalkey have claimed the last three Senior Hurling Championship titles and have become the undisputed best team in the county.
2010
Double champions
KildalkeyÕs elevation to the dominant force in Meath hurling has been remarkable considering what happened to them just four years ago. It was truly a day to forget as Rathmolyon inflicted a 24-point defeat in an SHC semi-final, but from that low they have risen to become the undisputed best team in the county.
2009
Kildalkey end 57-year wait
After so many disappointing final days over the last few decades, Kildalkey eventually found a crock of gold at the end of the rainbow when proving too good for Dunboyne in the 2009 Fox Bookmakers Meath SHC decider played at Pairc Tailteann on the first Sunday of October.
2008
Coming closer
Once again it was a case of so near and yet so far for Kildalkey as they failed to lay their SHC final bogey with Kilmessan outpointing them in the replay, having gone tantalisingly close to getting their hands on the elusive Jubilee Cup seven days earlier.
2007
Now a dual club
A failure to turn possession into scores on a consistent enough basis cost Kildalkey a place in the semi-finals of this year's Senior Hurling Championship and the opportunity to make amends for a very heavy defeat at the penultimate hurdle 12 months earlier.
2006
All blue and white
Many rural GAA clubs have struggled to keep up with their urban neighbours in recent years when it comes to success, but although Kildalkey have a small catchment area to choose from, titles were secured at underage level in 2006.
2005
Final heartbreak for resurgent Kildalkey
Kildalkey surpassed many people's expectations by qualifying for their first senior hurling championship final since 1990 this year. But their defeat to Killyon still came as a disappointment to up-and-coming midfielder Sean Heavey.
2004
Late stutter halts championship charge
A good start is supposed to be half the battle, but for the Kildalkey hurlers it didn't prove enough as they faltered after the brightest of openings to their 2004 Senior Championship campaign.
2003
Patience finally rewarded
Meath hurling needs clubs like Kildalkey. The small ball game has always been the county's poor relation in GAA terms. However, Kildalkey have proudly kept the flag flying high.
2002
Playing Russian roulette
Survival was very much the name of the game for Kildalkey in the 2002 Senior Hurling Championship and it was a case of mission accomplished thanks to two victories over reigning champions Trim, the second in a relegation play-off.
2001
Play-off heartbreak for Kildalkey
Kildalkey's bid for senior hurling championship honours was ended by Trim in a play-off last August. County senior panelist Dan Fagan looks back on a year that promised much but delivered little as he explains.
2000
A doer
Steely, stoical and stalwart members of Meath's hurling fraternity, the gaels of Kildalkey are proof positive that God loves a trier(s). Chairman of the club's juvenile committee, Pascal Carr, embodies the spirit within the club.
1999
Kildalkey continue to build foundations
Frank Dempsey looks at the proud traditions of the Kildalkey club and the bright future that is ahead of them.
1998
Unlucky thirteen
Sean Kealy has been trying to win the Jubilee Cup for 13 years with Kildalkey. Royal County discovers that the desire to succeed is stronger than ever.
   

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Killyon
2011
Job done
However, former Meath star and current manager Martin Massey admitted to the Royal County Yearbook that survival was the main aim in 2011.
2010
Killyon on the up
After holding their own with two of the most consistent sides in the Meath SHC over the last few years, Kildalkey and Dunboyne, in the group games, Killyon comfortably reached the last six in the race for the Jubilee Cup but then bowed out when losing to Trim in a quarter-final clash.Ê
2009
Can do more
This yearÕs campaign saw the Killyon senior hurlers fail to progress beyond the group stages of the championship, something that they will be hoping to rectify in 2010.
2008
Kit Mitchells 34 years as Killyon chairman
After lifting the Jubilee Cup for the first time in 14 years in 2005, Killyon have since struggled in the Meath SHC and after bowing out at the quarter-final stage the following year, they failed to get out of their group in each of the next two campaigns.
2007
Killyon ready to rock
When Killyon won their eighth senior hurling championship title in 2005 we expected that side to dominate Meath hurling for the following few years, but that has not been the case as the last two campaigns have ended in disappointment for Sean Ryan's charges.
2006
Bounce back factor
Having won the senior hurling championship in 2005, Killyon were looking to build on that success this year, but as club chairman Kit Mitchell explained that was always going to be hard, especially with the loss of some of their main players.
2005
Killyon grab gold
There was a change at the top in Meath hurling in 2005 with the Kilmessan-Trim stranglehold of the last few years being broken as Killyon returned to the summit, taking the SHC title for the seventh time and enjoying a first outright triumph since 1991.
2004
Always aiming to improve
While Killyon surprised themselves and Kilmessan by winning the Meath senior camogie title for the first time in eight years, the club's hurlers failed to make it to the knockout stages of the SHC.
2003
Playing catch up
Having reached the penultimate hurdle the previous year, only to lose out to Kilmessan after a replay, Killyon might have been expected to make a serious assault on the Senior Hurling Championship in 2003.
2002
Rub of the Greene
Killyon last won the Meath SHC in 1991. On the last Sunday of September the same year Kit Mitchell came off the Killyon bench and scored the winning goal in the junior hurling final against Donaghmore. The club had won both the senior and junior titles. At the time hushed whispers about a continued reign of Killyon dominance echoed ominously around clubrooms all across the county.
2001
Junior success for Killyon
While the Jubilee Cup once again eluded them, Killyon were victorious in the junior hurling championship. Goalkeeper Paul Leacy played his part in a success which Killyon supporters hope will lead to greater things.
2000
St Brigid
Royal County wanted to find out how life was treating the camogie players of Killyon and Meath. We were told there was only one person to contact: Killyon and Meath Camogie chairperson Brigid Carney.
1999
Killyon's future looking good
Appearances in the senior and junior finals, as well as underage success, bodes well for the future of Killyon. Frank Dempsey talks to Kit Mitchell about this year and next.
1998
Killyon's Paddy Quinn
Small in stature, perhaps . . . big in heart, definitely! Royal County traces a remarkable career - which isn't necessarily over yet!
   

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Killallon
 
2006
Remembering the class of '66
Forty years ago this year, Killallon competed in the junior ÔA' football championship final against Summerhill and although the men from North Meath were unfortunately beaten on that faithful day in October, the club marked the 40th anniversary of the match with a function held in The Old Darnley Lodge Hotel.
2005
Back on track
Two-thousand-and-five marked the return of Killallon GFC as a going concern. The resurrected north Meath club found the going tough at times and struggled to make a major impression, but they did at least get off the mark with a memorable 3-9 to 1-6 defeat of Drumbaragh in the junior ÔD' football championship at Ballinlough on Thursday July 14. Club secretary Chris Geraghty spoke to ÔRoyal County 2005' about the return of the Killallon men.
   

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Kilmainham
2011
Tailteann Cup glory and a second promotion for Kilmainham
The continuing rise of Kilmainham shows no signs of stopping as the Kells parish side gained their second consecutive promotion in the All County Leagues and also bagged the Tailteann Cup.
2010
Ross wants Kilmainham to push on
KilmainhamÕs efforts to make it back to the Junior Football Championship final met with major disappointment in 2010 when they failed to reach the knockout stages after a group campaign which saw them win three matches and suffer two defeats.
2009
Jordan keen for junior honours
After falling at the final hurdle in the Meath JFC in 2006, Kilmainham have not been able to get further than the last eight in the three subsequent races for the Matthew Ginnity Cup. This year local rivals Drumbaragh dashed their dreams of promotion to the intermediate grade. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Father to son
It was a case of the son following the lead set by the father when Kilmainham's Michael Newman made a big impression with the Meath minor footballers this year, winning a coveted Leinster Championship medal in the process.
2007
Itching to get back
Losing a county final is a shattering experience and takes time to recover from. But when winter turns to spring and the evenings start to stretch the feeling of hope, even optimism, gathers momentum and the new championship campaign just can't come around quick enough.
2006
Edging that bit closer
Losing a final can be a major setback for any club and although that is exactly what occurred to Kilmainham this year, team captain Trevor Lynch believes the appearance in their first junior ÔA' final should be looked on as a stepping stone for this young side.
2005
Kilmainham make strides
Since winning the junior 'B' football title back in 2001, Kilmainham have more than held their own in the 'A' ranks and following this year's performances, it may not be too long before the next step is made up to the intermediate championship.
2004
Home sweet home
While their trophy cabinet may be relatively bare compared to some of the Royal County's bigger hitters, Kilmainham GFC remain a success in their own right
2003
Right direction
Two-thousand-and-three was another decent year for Kilmainham. Even though key man Petsey Curran was sidelined with a rib injury for some crucial outings, they preserved their junior 'A' status and put down a clear marker for the coming season by winning Division 5 of the All County Leagues.
2002
Field of dreams
It is the height of winter, a bitterly cold December morning in North Meath. The field is pale white with frost and the soil is granite hard. A robin redbreast whistles by overhead. There is nobody around. The early morning fog makes it difficult to see, but then, there is not much to see. As Kilmainham folk rise from their beds and make their way to work, the field lies eerily quiet.
2001
Kilmainham's big day
Kilmainham are often titled Meath smallest club and amazingly the Kells parish outfit once went 5 years without winning a game. But 2001 proved to be a year amongst years for the men wearing the Down colours. The Junior B Championship trophy at last found itself in Sam Blacks.
2000
So close ...
Three close-calls prevented 2000 from being the most amazing year ever in the career of Barry Lynch. In the end it just turned out to be unforgettable.
1999
On the winners podium
Kilmainham's Under 21 success at the tail end of 1998 was due reward for the perseverence of the club. As well as being a morale booster, it paved the way for an excellent season in ‘99.
1998
Black's the name
When people think of Kilmainham they think of Sam Black. Royal County puts the question to as loyal a GAA man as you'll come across. Gaelic football and hurling at local level like all sporting organisations produces its fashionable teams, who tend to have a large playing base, and invariably smaller unglamorous sides, with scarce resources.
   

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Kilmainhamwood
2011
Not out of the woods yet
KilmainhamwoodÕs objective in 2011 was obvious: to get back out of junior ranks at the first time of asking. However, despite demonstrating decent form for most of the year, the ÔWood failed to deliver their best form in the championship, the result being that they didnÕt progress beyond the group stage. It was disappointing, no doubt, but long-serving attacker Ray Magee is confident that the North Meath men will begin their climb back up through the grades sooner rather than later.
2010
Time to regroup for Kilmainhamwood
Less than a year after being one step away from making an instant return to the senior ranks Kilmainhamwood suffered the bitter disappointment of enduring a second relegation in the space of three seasons when they surrendered their intermediate status in 2010.
2009
The ÔWood rediscover their strength
When Kilmainhamwood's stubborn resistance was finally broken last year and they surrendered their senior status, few could have expected that they would mount such a serious challenge in their pursuit of an immediate return to the top flight in 2009.
2008
The senior candle finally burns out
A dozen years after the club's 'day of all days' Kilmainhamwood slipped out of the senior ranks when they lost the relegation final to Rathkenny in mid-September, but while they were in the top flight of Meath football the Wood certainly enjoyed numerous occasions of significance.
2007
Third time running
Kilmainhamwood achieved an unusual treble when defeating Ballinlough at Kells in October to again preserve their senior football status. It was their third year in a row to win the final SFC relegation play-off.
2006
Confounding the critics
In recent years the fortunes of Kilmainhamwood in the SFC have had all the components of a gripping thriller and 2006 saw the latest sequel unfold as the Ôwood once again performed a great escape to avoid sliding into the intermediate ranks. By David Jennings.
2005
Relegation scare to spur the ÔWood
Relief was the overriding feeling in Kilmainhamwood after the North Meath outfit retained their senior status by virtue of a relegation play-off victory over Dunderry at the end of October. As relieved as he was, long-serving secretary Francie Owens is anxious that the ÔWood avoid a similar scenario in 2006.
2004
Mixed emotions
Kilmainhamwood aren't that far away from being serious Keegan Cup contenders, judging by most of their performances in 2004, but the clock is ticking on the class of 1996.
2003
Preservation all important
Kilmainhamwood preserved their senior status for another year when they beat Ballivor 1-8 to 0-8 in a relegation decider at Kells on Saturday, September 6.
2002
Too good to struggle
Kilmainhamwood might have expected to challenge for senior honours in 2002, but instead they found themselves with relegation on their minds at a time when they would have hoped to be thinking in terms of possible silverware.
2001
Wood you believe it
Kilmainhamwood's 0-15 to 0-8 defeat of Simonstown in A FL Div. 1 decider in Pairc Tailteann on Saturday 20th October saw the north Meath club annex league silverware for the second successive year having won Division 2 in 2000. The victory went some way towards atoning for the club's SFC quarter final defeat at the hands of Skryne
2000
Out of the blue!
Although blitzed by Dunshaughlin in the Senior Football Final, Kilmainhamwood can look back on their achievements in 2000 with pride and a large degree of optimism for the future. Royal County reviews an eventful year for the North Meath Club
1999
The Wood from the trees
Kilmainhamwood's footballers will look back on 1999 with mixed emotions - regret and relief. Many people's ante-post favourites for championship glory, they found themselves in the unenviable position of being in a relegation dog fight to stay in the top flight at the end of the season. Long time selector Denis Farrelly reviewed an eventful year with Royal County.
1998
The ‘Woods' man of Steel
Sean McCormack played for Meath at the highest level. Royal County explores an era that is a million miles away from the life we now live in.
   

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Kilmessan
2011
Extra heartache for Blues
Following on from last year's defeat to Kildalkey in the county final, Kilmessan set about to make amends in this year's campaign. Possessing some of the most talented hurlers that the county has ever produced, Kilmessan are annually regarded as one of the favourites for the title and rightly so.
2010
Effort to regain title falls short on final day
After taking the title for the 28th time in 2008, Kilmessan have had to settle for the bronze and silver medal positions in the last two renewals of the Meath Senior Hurling Championship. Last year they lost out to eventual winners Kildalkey in a replayed semi-final and then after progressing one step further, they lost to the same opposition on October 10th last.
2009
Close to greatness
On foot of regaining the Meath SHC title in 2008, Kilmessan went on win the Leinster Club intermediate hurling title before the year's end. This year saw them fall short at the 'semi' stage in the two major competitions they bid for. By Liam OÕRourke.
2008
Champions once more
After being surprised by neighbours Kiltale in the previous yearÕs decider, there was no slip-up by Kilmessan in the 2008 M. Donnelly Meath Senior Hurling Championship with Kildalkey being overcome at the second attempt as the title was annexed for the 28th time. By Noel Coogan.
2007
Final disappointment for Kilmessan
One hundred years after winning the Meath SHC title for the first time, Kilmessan had high hopes for 2007 but they failed to deliver the goods in the Jubilee Cup decider as well as falling at the final hurdle in the JHC.
2006
Abundance of silverware obtained
Kilmessan's failure to reach a second consecutive senior hurling championship final may be seen as something of a failure for a club of its stature, but secretary Dominic Doyle revealed there was plenty of silverware obtained in 2006.
2005
Clynch sends out warning
Kilmessan's bid for a fourth consecutive SHC title ended at the semi-final stage this year. However county star Stephen Clynch is adamant that the blue and whites will return as strong as ever in the next campaign.
2004
‘Miley' made his mark!
The contrast in sporting fortunes between the two halves of one parish could hardly be starker. For Dunsany GFC, the long wait for an emergence from the JFC continues on for another year while the Kilmessan HC bandwagon just keeps rolling on.
2003
Kilmessan equal record
The 2003 Meath senior hurling championship title was annexed by Kilmessan once again at the expense of latter day rivals Dunboyne at rain swept Pairc Tailteann on September 5th, the blue and white's 26th triumph in the Jubilee Cup.
2002
A 25th success
Following the frustrations of 2000 when they failed to fulfil the Jubilee Cup final against Trim because of a dispute over the fixing of the game, Kilmessan's SHC triumph in 2002 was especially sweet. More especially because it was achieved in the club's Centenary Year and also because it was their 25th outright success.
2001
Hurling is Horan's first love
Kilmessan and Meath hurling star Nicky Horan won't recall 2001 with happy memories in the future., as it was the first time in the club colours that he didn't get to tog out on Meath SHC final day.
2000
Kilmessan - The hurling tradition
We look back at the proud record of Kilmessan GHC and those who brought it to prominence. When the Kilmessan club made the decision not to fulfill their Senior Hurling Final engagement on October 1st in this millennium year, it wasn't just a matter of any old club making a protest.
1999
Hurling's Aristocrats
Kilmessan put their name on the Meath roll of honour for the 24th time in October. Royal County reviews their successful year.
1998
On the home straight
Leading National Hunt jockey Adrian Maguire's interest in the Meath football team has never waned ... as Royal County discovered.
   

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Kilskyre
2011
Gilsenan eager for hurling boost
Kilskyre chairman Tom Gilsenan has just completed his first year in the position and he speaks to the Royal County Yearbook about the past 12 months, which have been eventful to say the least.
2010
So near, yet so far
When Kilskyre were relegated from the intermediate hurling ranks at the end of the 2009 season, it was seen as a step back for the club, but it was a move that was to rejuvenate this north Meath side.
2009
Suffering from the numbers game
This time 40 years ago Kilskyre were celebrating success in the Intermediate Hurling Championship, but four decades on the contrast couldn't have been any greater as they endured a torrid time in the middle grade competition and were relegated back to junior ranks.
2008
Soldiering on
This year marks the 60th anniversary of Meath's 1948 All-Ireland Junior Hurling Championship success and it is only fitting to chronicle the considerable contribution that players from Kilskyre made to that significant triumph.
2007
Kilskyre left wondering what if
Intermediate hurling in Meath is sometimes frowned upon by its peers, but the players that take part in the campaign are pre-dominantly just as determined and committed as any club player in any grade.
2006
Fade out after early promise
After contesting two semi-finals and one final since 2002, Kilskyre were once again expected to be in the shake-up for intermediate hurling championship honours this year. But they failed to progress beyond the group stages with former player and PRO Mark Owens attributing their disappointing year to injuries and a lack of commitment.
2005
Heartache for Kilskyre
The 2005 Meath intermediate hurling championship produced a number of surprises as both the favourites for the title exited at the semi-final stage. Kilskyre were one of those sides to bow out at the penultimate stage and captain Seamus Byrne told the Royal County GAA yearbook of the club's disappointment.
2004
Kilskyre capable of better
After reaching the intermediate hurling final in 2002 and the semi-final last year, Kilskyre were expected to be in the shake-up for honours this year. But they failed to live up to expectations with full back Barry Smyth citing a lack of commitment as the reason for their disappointing year.
2003
Minors carry flag
Having contested two intermediate hurling finals in the last four years while reaching the semi-finals on an annual basis, Kilskyre can't be blamed for wondering will they ever have a change of fortune.
2002
Heartbreak only intermediate
It has been seven years since Kilskyre last played in the senior hurling championship and although they were beaten in this year's intermediate final by Wolfe Tones, it may not be too long before this young side are back among the senior ranks.
2001
Renehan recalls a famous win
Eugene Renehan was a member of the Kilskyre team which won the junior hurling championship of 1945. Here, he recalls that memorable victory and much, much more besides.
2000
Passion to Byrne
Over the years, the parish of Kilskyre has produced some great GAA men - the redoubtable Peter Byrne among them.
1999
A Kilskyre stalwart
Mickey Reilly has been a driving force behind Kilskyre since the club was revived nearly 40 years ago. Here, he talks to us about his lifelong involvement in Kilskyre and the club's unlucky defeat in the recent intermediate hurling decider.
1998
In defence of the last line
Paddy Muldoon played between the sticks for Kilskyre for a lifetime. Royal County explores a career and a person-ality that are second to none.
   

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Kiltale
2011
Donoghue keen on final push
Since winning the senior hurling title in 2007, Kiltale have been regarded on an annual basis as one of the favourites to lift the Jubilee Cup, but despite their continued success at underage level, they have failed to reach the decider.
2010
KiltaleÕs semi-final bogey
Getting back to the Senior Hurling Championship final is proving difficult for Kiltale and when they lost to neighbours Kilmessan at the semi-final stage in 2010 it was the third successive year that they bowed out at the penultimate hurdle.

2009

Clean sweepers
When it comes to underage hurling, Kiltale could not have asked for a better season in 2009. Four county titles, along with a minor crown carried over from Õ08, clearly indicates that there are promising times ahead for the club in the near future. Now they know they will need to nourish the talent.
2008
Penultimate loss - underage again delivers
After gaining outright honours in the Meath Senior Hurling Championship for the third time in 2007, the task of retaining the title proved beyond Kiltale as Paddy KellyÕs men fell to the sword of Kildalkey at the penultimate hurdle
2007
Jubilee cup for young guns
The 2007 M Donnelly Meath Senior Hurling Championship had a remarkable home run with Kiltale continuing to defy the odds and finishing the campaign in a blaze of glory with a sensational victory over Kilmessan to take the title for the first time since 1983.
2006
Underage success bodes well
After going close to reaching the decider the previous year, Kiltale endured a difficult 2006 Senior Hurling Championship campaign and instead of challenging for the Jubilee Cup they diced with death for much of the campaign. It was only when they drew with Kildalkey in the final round of group matches that they knew for certain they would hold onto their top grade status.
2005
Sky's the limit for Durnin
Kiltale's interest in this year's senior hurling championship may have once again ended at the semi-final stage, but the club continues to head in the right direction. Kiltale captured the minor hurling title in 2005 and top forward Peter Durnin believes it may not be too long before a SHC title is annexed.
2004
Things are looking good
The sun shone brightly on a hugely significant and proud day in the history of Kiltale Hurling Club when the official opening of their fabulous new pitch and clubhouse facilities at Grange took place on Saturday, May 1, 2004.
2003
Junior success
Kiltale hurling club have gone through somewhat of a barren spell with regards to success at adult level over the past decade or so, but a win in the junior II championship this year is the boost needed in the area according to long serving player Paul Regan.
2002
Starting a winning habit
Winning the Under-12 Hurling Championship title made 2002 a year to remember for the Kiltale club and it certainly augurs well for the future as they bid to return to the glory days of two decades ago when the Jubilee Cup was won in successive years in 1982 and ‘83.
2001
Kiltale make progress
Kiltale might not have qualified for the latter stages of the senior hurling championship but it was a satisfactory year nonetheless according to manager Tommy Donoghue.
2000
A Tale to tell
Francis Lynch talks about the effort involved in keeping Kiltale among the higher order of Meath hurling. As we look back on the 2000 GAA season, not just in Meath but in all of Ireland, it is hard not to notice what the experts have been saying about hurling these past 12 months. The game, it seems, is in crisis again.
1999
It's a long road from Tipperary
One of the county's most respected hurling men is Kiltale's Noel Keating. Here, the Tipperary native chats to Royal County about his career, his involvement with Kiltale and his fantastic achievement in guiding Meath to Under 21 and Junior All-Ireland glory this year.
1998
A guiding force
Paddy Kelly knows enough about Meath hurling to put anybody in their place. Royal County was on the receiving end of a lesson about the small ball game in Meath.
   

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Longwood
2011
Mission possible
For any team that moves up a grade, the main aim is to establish themselves at the higher level and that is what the Longwood hurlers have set about doing since their return to the top flight of Meath senior hurling two years ago.
2010
Longwood on the rise
After the heady success of 2009, the past 12 months proved a bit quieter for Longwood at adult level, although St FinianÕs, the minor amalgamation with Ballivor, secured a Division 2 league crown. Royal County caught up with dual star Enda Dixon and Rory Maguire, the Meath junior ace who guided the minors to glory.
2009
Double delight in Longwood
What a year it has been for Longwood! A return to the top flight of Meath hurling thanks to their stylish success in the Intermediate Championship was followed by a first Junior Football Championship triumph in 70 years, making 2009 extra special. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Competing on two fronts
As the Longwood club reflects on 2008, they will harbour some regrets after falling at the penultimate hurdle in both the IHC and JFC with a good number of players giving service to both teams.
2007
Lady luck deserts Longwood
In the last couple of years, Longwood have been touted as potential JFC winners and although they have traded blows with the best in the business, they are still awaiting a breakthrough to the Intermediate ranks. 2007 marked another frustrating year for the club as they failed to progress to the knockout stages, despite only suffering one defeat in six outings.
2006
A learning curve
For the second year running, Longwood reached the junior football championship semi-final, only to lose to St. Ultan's. While disappointed not to have gone a step further, selector Noel Kerrigan believes another year in the junior championship might not be such a bad thing for the improving south county outfit.
2005
Longwood land on their feet
After winning the Junior B FC title in 2004, Longwood did well to get to the last four in the Junior A FC this year and another highlight of the south county club's season was winning the B Football League Division 6 title.
2004
Reward at last
We can only hope that Longwood's great football double in 2004 is not a portent of doom and gloom. The club's most memorable successes were achieved against a background of tragic conflict on the world stage.
2003
Within range
Longwood came close to reaching the semi-finals of the Senior Hurling Championship of 2003 but, after winning promotion in the All-County A Football League for the second year running slipped up in the Junior B Football Championship.
2002
Promotion to open new doors
Longwood can look back on their exploits in 2002 with immeasurable pride. After 17 years of honest endeavour, the club's footballers finally brought home an adult football title in the form of the Division 5 All County 'A' League. Selector Barry Ennis reviews an eventful year.
2001
Underage delight for Longwood
Successes at under 11, under 14, under 16 and under 17 level, made it a year to remember for Longwood's underage section.
2000
Back to the Future
Since its inception in September of 1904, Longwood GAA has experienced its fair share of ups and downs. Club secretary George Stagg pointed Royal County in the direction of ‘club historian' James Farrell to find out more.
1999
Longwood a club with serious intent
Longwood are a club on an upward spiral in both hurling and football. Frank Dempsey takes a close look at Meath's ‘Lilywhites'.
1998
Justice at last
Longwood have finally claimed their rightful place at the senior hurling table. Royal County examines the successful championship year.
   

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Meath Hill
2011
Meath Hill look to the youth
In a year when they narrowly missed out on a place in the knockout stages of the JFC, Meath Hill could take encouragement from the performances of their up-and-coming players as chairman Mickey Crosby explains.
2010
Meath Hill on the rise again
Meath Hill advanced to the knockout stages of the Junior Football Championship for the first time since 2007, but when the do or die action commenced they were eliminated at the quarter-final hurdle by Ballinabrackey. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Nearly 30 years on
Next year will mark the 30th anniversary of Meath Hill's 1980 Junior Football Championship triumph, but their efforts to scale such heights met with further frustration this year when they failed to negotiate the group stage in the race for the Matthew Ginnity Cup.
2008
Terrible luck
When the sour taste of defeat is experienced only once in a championship campaign, you would have expected the side in question to be bang in contention at the business end of the competition. But for Meath Hill, a solitary loss in this yearÕs LynchÕs Pharmacy JFC was enough to knock them out of the race for top honours before the knockout stages had even commenced.
2007
Tremendous progress for Meath Hill
Meath Hill may have suffered disappointment in their quest for Junior Football Championship honours in 2007, but it still represented a year of tremendous progress for the club, particularly with the installation of their fabulous new Prunty pitch.
2006
Top of the north
There were definite signs during the 2006 Junior Football Championship that Meath Hill might well be on the verge of bridging a gap that now extends over a quarter of a century. This proud club from way up in the north of the county has to look back to 1980 for its last success in the grade, but they shaped well enough in the campaign gone by to suggest that they are building up a head of steam that might just bring the desired breakthrough in the very near future.
2005
Hill knocking on that door
Back in 1979 Meath Hill held a handsome lead over St Mary's at half time in the Meath JFC final and on the way off the Pairc Tailteann pitch one of their players lifted the cup off the table and raised the trophy in front of the packed stand. The celebrations were premature as Mary's staged a strong recovery in the second half to force a replay in which the East Meath side proved best. By Noel Coogan.
2004
Mission accomplished
North county outfit Meath Hill set their stall out at the beginning of the year to regain their Div. 4 ‘A' league status and make it to the knockout stages of the Junior ‘A' Football Championship. Club secretary and captain Tadhg Boyle reviewed the year.
2003
Kieran scales the heights
In 2003, a disappointing year in terms of club results, one of Meath Hill's own flourished away from the playing-fields of junior club football. Barry Kieran finished the summer with an All-Ireland medal in his back pocket after playing his part in the success of the county's controversial juniors.
2002
King of the Hill
Paddy Owens has been a Meath Hill favourite, both on and off the field, for many years now. In recent times 'The Hill' have been rapping on the intermediate championship door and although a key figure in this himself, Paddy says that he deserves none of the plaudits. Those plaudits, he argues, should be placed upon only one set of broad shoulders, those of trainer Tommy Dowd.
2001
Far from over the Hill!
In the best tradition of sporting parlance, Meath Hill would be classed as an ‘up and coming' team. Club stalwart John Cunningham goes along with that view and looks forward to the club getting its hands on some silverware, sooner rather than later.
2000
One of Meath Hill's best
Charlie Boyle's name is synonymous with Meath Hill. Here he talks about the past and the future. Organised by the Meath County Board, The Sean Gael Awards held in the Simonstown Gaels GFC clubhouse was one of the highlights of the local GAA year.
1999
Best supported club in Meath?
If there was an award for the best supported club in the Royal County, Meath Hill would top most people's lists. The north Meath club is blessed with a large following which would put some of the senior clubs to shame.
1998
‘The First Lady' of Meath Hill
Celine Nulty eats, sleeps and breaths Gaelic Football. As a player, coach and most recently as an administrator she loves the game with a passion. Royal County caught up with the hard working Meath Hill secretary and reviewed an eventful year for the North Meath Club.
   

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Moylagh
2011
Familiar story for Moylagh
It was a familiar story for Moylagh this year when their JFC interests were ended at the quarter-final stage. While admitting that their failure to show their true form in knockout games has been a huge source of frustration, Moylagh chairman Declan Flood refuses to be disheartened.
2010
Moylagh so close to that final push
Moylagh have impressed with their consistency in the Junior Football Championship in recent years, but when it has come to the knockout action, despite their potential, they just havenÕt been able to push on strongly enough to get through to the final. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Knockout bogey continues
Moylagh have been Ôthere or thereaboutsÕ in the Meath JFC over the last few years and in 2009 they were again strong contenders for the Matthew Ginnity Cup before Dunsany dashed their hopes of outright glory at the semi-final stage. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Success with both codes
After the promise demonstrated in 2007, Moylagh could justifiably have gone into this year's Junior Football Championship with hopes of winning the title, but instead they bowed out at the last eight stage against one of the most consistent teams in the grade, Dunsany.
2007
Within touching distance
If natural progression can be taken at face value Moylagh should reach the Junior Football Championship final in 2008. Last year they advanced to the quarter-finals where they lost to Dunsany and this term they went a step further by making it to the semi-finals where Moynalvey eliminated them from the title race.
2006
Worth waiting for
Thirty-one years is a long time to wait and Moylagh GAA Club was justifiably thrilled at Pairc Tailteann on an overcast Saturday in September. The club from the north-west of the county headed to Navan that day in the knowledge that it wasn't since their memorable IFC triumph back in 1975 that they had managed to win an adult championship title.
2005
Genuine contenders
For a while there, Moylagh's junior footballers looked like contenders in 2005. Genuine contenders. But somewhere along the way the wheels came off. By Gordon Manning.
2004
A busy year
Moylagh were pipped at the post for a place in the knockout stages of the Junior ‘A' Football Championship, made it to a Junior ‘D' semi-final final, a Junior ‘A' hurling semi-final and continue to make great stride at underage level.
2003
Gerrys gra for Moylagh
Having lost nine of the team - through injuries and retirements - that went under to Navan O'Mahony's in quarter final of the 2002 Junior 'A' championship, Moylagh weren't expecting to set the world on fire in 2003. Former player and long-time administrator Gerry Grall reviewed the year.
2002
No regular Joe
Moylagh midfielder Joe Melia could be forgiven for turning off his mobile phone, placing a large 'do not disturb' sign on his bedroom door and burying himself under a tog-15 duvet for a few days.
2001
The Moylagh Flood
Johnny Flood's reminiscences on the travails and joy experienced as a player with his native Moylagh in times past are redolent of an era when football was a synonym for religion.
2000
Hurling prospering in Moylagh
The underage hurlers of Moylagh have been making plenty of waves of late and the progress being made was illustrated with the annexation of two championships in recent years. That success bears testimony to the hard work which is being carried out by the likes of underage hurling secretary Paul Foley and many other dedicated coaches.
1999
Moylagh came so close
Moylagh's poor record in county finals came back to haunt them in ‘99, but that bogey will surely be laid to rest in the near future.
1998
Strapped to the electric Chair
Resurgent Moylagh made it to the semi-final of this year's junior championship. Chairman Brendan Dolan tells Royal County that the best is yet to come.
   

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Moynalty
2011
Moynalty crave consistency
Moynalty are facing into their eighth year in the junior ÔBÕ football ranks after bowing out at the quarter-final stage of this yearÕs championship to Clonard. Team captain Donal Lynch believes a lack of consistency is preventing the north Meath club from playing at a higher level.
2010
The final heartbreak has to end soon
Moynalty have developed an unwanted habit of losing finals and after finishing in second place in both the Junior B FC and the Division 5 FL in 2009, they again got to the championship decider this year only to again fall short.
2009

Final failures mar Moynalty season
After reaching the final of both the Junior B Football Championship and the Division 5 FL, 2009 promised to be a memorable year for Moynalty but David Jennings found out that heartbreaking defeats in those deciders were a bitter pill to swallow in what was a very promising campaign for the club.

2008
Striving for success
Moynalty has gained plenty of headlines for its Tidy Towns achievements and the popular annual Steam Threshing Festival and it is now pushing to create a name for itself once more on the football fields.
2007
Knocking on the door
Moynalty's bid for Junior B Football Championship honours came to an end at the quarter-final stage in 2007 when they lost to Wolfe Tones, but they demonstrated plenty of character in that match which went to extra time.
2006
Good work continues
Moynalty Juvenile section followed up last year's successful season with a year to remember in 2006. To say this small parish is on an upward curve is an understatement. The North Meath club is on a crest of a wave after its U14 side completed the double by capturing the league and championship in the same season.
2005
There are some tidy footballers in Moynalty
Moynalty lifted their first under 14 league title since 1994, when they overcame the challenge of near neighbours, Ballinlough in the Div. 4A title decider at Carlanstown at the end of June. Juvenile chairman Tom Lynch reviewed the year with John Loughran.
2004
A cruel blow
Moynalty had hoped to be in the knock-out stages of the Junior ‘A' Football Championships at the business end of the season. In contrast they found themselves embroiled in a relegation play-off, which ultimately led to relegation. Club secretary Joe Curley reviewed an average season.
2003
Moynalty answer county call
They hide it well in Moynalty. Deep among north Meath's rolling hills, the Red and Whites have constantly managed to churn out remarkable talent. County stars, county managers and All-Ireland winners.
2002
Clearly Red and White
Damien Lynch was only seven when he pulled on a Moynalty jersey for the first time. In the 18 years since, football has afforded him the pleasure of good days and the pain of bad ones. Unfortunately 2002 produced plenty of the latter, as Moynalty now find themselves at a football crossroads.
2001
Looking to the future
Moynalty has produced more than its share of officials and great servants of anything GAA over the decades. Club stalwart Paddy Gaynor reflects on his time with his native club.
2000
Vaulting ambition
Sean Boylan has shown time and time again that there's no glass ceiling policy in place when it comes to giving youngsters their head. Moynalty young gun Stephen Smith is ready, willing and able to be a Boylan Babe.
1999
The life of Reilly
Charlie Reilly, a selector with the Moynalty Intermediates this year and former player, reflects on a poor year for the north Meath club. They narrowly escaped relegation to the junior grade but off the field they continued to make progress.
1998
Moynalty's Lynchpin
If ever there was a player that epitomised the spirit which exists in Moynalty then it's Thomas Og Lynch. Here he chats to Royal County about the reasons behind the club's poor performance in ‘98 and their prospects of winning the Intermediate championship in the near future.
   

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Moynalvey
2011
A year of riches for Moynalvey
Moynalvey are one of the younger GAA clubs in the county, yet in their relatively short history they have achieved two outstanding leaps to prominence, the most recent this year when they rejoined the senior football ranks.
2010
Moynalvey more than hold their ground
In their third year since rejoining the intermediate ranks, Moynalvey were drawn in a tough group that included eventual winners, Nobber, and didn't make it beyond the initial phase.
2009
An upward learning curve
After claiming county and provincial junior football titles in 2008, Moynalvey found the going a little difficult on their move up to the IFC and won just one of their four games. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Climbing the ladder again
The road back to a final can seem long and rocky after you have lost one, but Moynalvey successfully negotiated the journey this year, before they went on to be thoroughly worthy winners of their first Junior Football Championship title since 1981. By Paul Clarke.
2007
The final step
Losing a county final is always a shattering experience and it was no different for Moynalvey in 2007 when Clann na nGael edged them out in the Junior Football Championship decider at Pairc Tailteann on the first Sunday of October.
2006
Turning corners
Moynalvey is certainly on the way up. 2006 will be remembered as the season progress was made. Foundations for the coming years were cemented as the stars of the future won three underage titles. The MFL division 3 crown, U-12 division 3 south and the U-14 division 4 FL were captured in a successful period.
2005
Adults falter as kids show the way
For much of the Junior Football Championship campaign it looked as if Moynalvey would make it through to the knock-out stages, but there was ultimate disappointment as they just failed to qualify for the business end of the competition.
2004
Youth create confident glow
Firsts in anything are always extra special and that's exactly how it was for the Moynalvey club in 2004 as they clinched an historic and highly significant first triumph at under-14 level.
2003
Waiting to bounce back
Moynalvey know what it's like to mix it with the big guns and they possess a real desire to bounce back from recent disappointments, but their first campaign back in the junior ranks failed to bring the desired success in 2003.
2002
Girls just wanna have fun
Picture the scene! It is a bright but breezy August evening. The Moynalvey dressing rooms are a hive of activity. Inside the smell of musty sweat from years past fills the air as the footballers pull on their socks and slip into their muddy boots. Most talk, some joke and a few prepare quietly. Others bounce the polished white O'Neill's football on the ground or off the wall in front of them.
2001
Finding their feet
Moynalvey, in their first year as an intermediate side after relegation from the senior ranks in 2000, struggled to gain the level of consistency required to make a concerted challenge for the title.
2000
17 year stay over ... for now
Moynalvey's spell in the senior grade came to an end. But the potential is there to ensure a quick return.
1999
Moynalvey's great escape
Moynalvey demonstrated their survival instincts last season when retaining senior status at the expense of Slane. Goalkeeper Derek Bannon outlines to Royal County the importance of remaining in the top flight.
1998
Jekyll and Hyde Moynalvey
1998 will not hold many fond memories for the gaels of Moynalvey - with the exception of their 2nd round, championship defeat of Simonstown.
 

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Na Fianna
2011
Historic Leinster hurling success for Na Fianna
No question what the highlight of Na FiannaÕs year was Ð an historic Leinster Hurling Division 3 title which was claimed after a bruising replay against Shanahoe of Laois.
2010
Little room for error for Na Fianna on two fronts
The Na Fianna senior hurlers and intermediate footballers were both in with a chance of reaching the knockout stages as the group phase of their respective championships drew to a conclusion, but neither managed to make it through to the business end of the competitions. By Paul Clarke.
2009
A coming force
Na Fianna went for a high profile football manager in 2009 when former county star Graham Geraghty took over from Kit Henry, but their Intermediate Championship campaign ended in bitter disappointment when they were just edged out of a qualification place. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Hard earned status preserved
In their second year in Meath hurlingÕs premier grade, Na Fianna avoided the drop back down to the intermediate ranks and they made progress in the IFC by getting to the quarter-finals only to lose out to Gaeil Colmcille after extra-time in Athboy.
2007
A busy year for Na Fianna
Most club players never get the chance to play at county level in their career. Never mind play for three different county sides in the one year. But Jamie Queeney is part of a rare breed and the imposing full-forward accomplished that feat in 2007 by lining out for the Under 21's, the juniors while also featuring in Colm Coyle's senior panel that made it to the All-Ireland semi-final.
2006
Senior hurling Awaits
A year after suffering intermediate hurling final heartache against Blackhall Gaels, Na Fianna made amends with a well deserved win over Dunderry to claim their place amongst the senior ranks of Meath hurling clubs for the first time.
2005
An eventful year on all fronts
Na Fianna's footballers had two objectives for the 2005 season Ð an improved league performance and a place in the knockout stage of the IFC. They achieved one of these with ease (pushing hard for promotion to Division One) but fell well short on the other score (managing just two wins in Group 2 of the intermediate championship). The hurlers, meanwhile, went all the way to the IHC final, only to be edged out by surprise packet Blackhall Gaels.
2004
Getting stronger
In their fifth year as a club, Na Fianna had their share of ups and downs in 2004. The Enfield/Baconstown outfit failed to make it through to the closing stages of the IFC, they got to the last four of the IHC only to lose to Gaeil Colmcille, were beaten finalists in the MFC but enjoyed a minor/under 16 B hurling double success.
2003
Treble joy for na fianna
Outright success in three under-age football competitions helped make 2003 a highly successful year for the Na Fianna club and certainly suggested that the Enfield/Baconstown combination can look forward to a very bright future.
2002
Kelly's Heroes
Success. A sporting illusion of grandeur to sit at the winner's table, or a fleeting moment in time when for once the spotlight is directed upon somebody different? Sometimes, just sometimes it is not about the competing, it's about the winning. And success has not been long coming to south Meath club Na Fianna.
2001
Knocking on the door
Just two years after coming into existence, south Meath amalgamation Na Fianna are knocking on the door of the senior championship. Their star forward Paul Hanley was disappointed by the club's narrow failure to qualify for the intermediate semi-finals in 2001, but he believes that with consistency and a bit of luck, Na Fianna could make it to senior level before long.
2000
New kids on the block
Na Fianna were the new kids on the block in 2000 and their performances in both the football and hurling championships proves that the decision of the Enfield and Baconstown clubs to join forces was an inspired one. The south Meath club has the potential to become a major power in Royal County GAA circles in the coming years.
   
   

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Nobber
2011
Nobber hold their own
2011 was an excellent year for Nobber and they can take encouragement from their performances in what was their first season back in the top flight.
2010
Nobber back with the big boys
Since Nobber won the Junior Football Championship in 2002 they have been consistently fancied to move another step up the ladder by adding the intermediate title and they finally delivered this year when powering past Carnaross in a surprisingly one-sided final. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Closing on a senior return
Nobber's search for a return to the senior ranks goes on after their latest attempt to win the Intermediate Football Championship ended in bitter disappointment when they lost to neighbours Kilmainhamwood in a replayed semi-final this year. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Favourites falter during run-in
In the early stages of the race for Mattie McDonnell Cup honours, Nobber were nicely positioned and looked highly likely to play a big hand in the finish. But the second half of the season proved disastrous for Ciaran ConlonÕs charges and two defeats from their final three outings consigned them to a shock exit at the end of the group stages.
2007
Will be warm favourites again
Although Nobber were tipped as possible winners of the Lagan Group IFC back in April and were the 2/1 favourites with just four teams left in the title race, they were fallers at the second last hurdle.
2006
Drawing comfort
Nobber earned the tag of draw specialists during the 2006 Intermediate Football Championship when they finished level in four of their seven group matches. That might be termed consistent, but it was a trend that threatened to derail their qualification hopes before they eventually scraped through to the last eight.
2005
Nobber are one step away
On the 25th anniversary of their last outright success in the Meath Intermediate Football Championship Nobber failed to lift the Mattie McDonnell Cup, bowing out at the semi-final stage for the second year in a row. By Noel Coogan.
2004
Ready for that opportunity
Nobber's young guns aren't a million miles away from winning the Intermediate Football Championship judging by their performances in 2004.
2003
The winning run continues
Following their Meath JFC success of 2002, there were further visits to the winners' enclosure for Nobber this year with outright victories in the All-Ireland Junior 15-a-side and seven-a-side competitions as well as taking the All County A Division 4 League title. Later the Under 21 B trophy travelled up Proudstown Hill.
2002
Nobber bite back
Between the early ‘70s and the ‘80s Nobber rose from the humble abode of junior B ranks to become one of the top senior football sides in Meath. When this writer started covering the GAA scene in the Royal County tin 1972 they were in the lowest of all the adult grades but four years on they got to the JFC final only to lose to Curraha.
2001
Nobber bounce back
Nobber gaels will have gleaned much satisfaction from the performance of their junior team in this year's championship where they reached the semi-final stages. Team trainer Andy Hayes hopes it is the beginning of a reversal of fortunes for the north Meath club.
2000
Nobber claim U14 league title
Royal County looks back on a year when Nobber defied the odds and won their second ever U14 league title.
1999
The middle man
Nobber's Eugene McDonnell is one of the longest serving referees on the Meath GAA club scene. He talks to Royal County about his whistling career and says that, contrary to popular opinion, it's not a thankless existence.
1998
A Loyal servant
Over the years Nobber GFC have been blessed with dedicated gaels. Honourary Club President Peter Eogan is just one example. Here he talks with Royal County about the current state of play in the North Meath club and his lifelong involvement.
   

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Oldcastle
2011
Feis Cup consolation for Oldcastle
Victory in the delayed 2010 Feis Cup final, coupled with a fine All-County League Division 2 campaign, were the highlights of the disappointing year for Oldcastle whose championship interests were ended at an early stage.
2010
If the injuries recede, Oldcastle will prosper
The awful prospect of losing their senior status within a year of securing a very impressive intermediate championship title loomed large for Oldcastle as summer turned to autumn in 2010, but a precious victory over St UltanÕs in a relegation play-off in early September secured survival. By Paul Clarke.
2009
OldcastleÕs due reward
It was a real rags to riches story as Oldcastle claimed the Lagan Group Meath Intermediate Football Championship title in spectacular style, having had to survive a relegation play-off the previous year. By Noel Coogan.
2008
All the way to the wire
After going agonisingly close to reaching the final in 2006, Oldcastle's life in the Intermediate Football Championship has been a big struggle and it went all the way to the wire as they won the relegation rattle against Ballivor.
2007
An uphill challenge
One game above all others probably summed up Oldcastle's struggle in the 2007 Intermediate Football Championship. In 2006 they defeated Gaeil Colmcille by eight points in a quarter-final at Ballinlough and played well enough to suggest that they might just be ready to go all the way in the very near future. The Kells combination easily reversed that result in this year's championship.
2006
Consistency comes
Oldcastle will look back on 2006 and wonder how their intermediate footballers didn't manage to claim some silverware. Few clubs could match their level of consistency which saw them lose only one competitive game in league and championship, yet they ended the campaign with nothing to show for their efforts.
2005
Third time lucky for Oldcastle Under 16s
Oldcastle's victory in the Under 16 Football League Division 3 final augurs well for the North Meath club, according to team manager Harry Taggart.
2004
Moores almanac
Oldcastle will have to wait for another year for an opportunity to regain senior status, following their exit from the 2004 Intermediate Football Championship at the hands of Nobber in the quarter-finals. Selector Eamonn Moore reviewed the year
2003
A legend
Batty McEnroe is a living legend in Oldcastle football circles. As man and boy he has given more than 60-years service to the club
2002
Bowing out
After 15 years in the top flight, Oldcastle lost their Senior Football Championship status in 2002 when they were edged out by survival specialists Summerhill in the relegation final which was played in atrocious cold, wet and windy conditions at Kells in late October.
2001
The Gallant John Joe
John Joe McEnroe made his bow in 2001 as chairman of Oldcastle GFC but he's no rookie GAA administrator. Far from it. Fact is the man in the hot seat has been an almost ever-present member of the club's think-tank team and was secretary of the blue and whites as far back as 1975. We chat to the bold J.J.
2000
Eamon for more success
The much-travelled Eamon Gillic is back on home soil after spells in nearby Munterconnacht and a wee bit further afield in San Francisco. Four years on from steering his adopted Young Irelanders to back-to-back North American titles, the Oldcastle-based businessman had cause last July to celebrate the lifting of the Meath Under 16 Division Three title.
1999
Oldcastle's Feis
In winning the Feis Cup Oldcastle finally got some reward for the enormous effort exerted over the past couple of years.
1998
Towering ‘Castle
Continually written off, Oldcastle proved all doubters wrong and made people sit up and take note of north Meath football
   

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O'Mahonys
2011
League and U21 glory bode well for OÕMahonyÕs
Navan OÕMahonys missed out on the big prize for the third successive year, but there was some compensation for their senior footballers in the shape of the A League Division 1 title, while the success of their under-21s certainly augurs well for the future.
2010
A fitting year to win the Delaney Cup
The manner in which unfancied Navan O'Mahonys won the minor football championship was a fitting tribute to the memory of the club's legendary mentor, Paddy O'Brien, who passed away in June.
2009
Busy on Brews Hill
Navan O'Mahonys began the year in possession of the Keegan Cup but were relieved of it after a SFC semi-final replay against Wolfe Tones that was tinged with controversy.
2008
In a class of their own
After falling short in the two previous Meath SFC finals, it was do or die for Navan OÕMahonys in 2008 and they made no mistake with an unbeaten campaign enabling them to gain possession of the coveted Keegan Cup for the first time in 11 years.
2007
Promise unfulfilled
For the second time in a little over a year Navan O'Mahonys had to watch as their final opponents carried the Keegan Cup out of town. That hurts for such an outstanding club which has won the Senior Football Championship more times than anybody else.
2006
Pipped at the post
Adding a 17th Senior Football Championship title is proving to be a very difficult task for Navan O'Mahonys. The most successful club in the history of the competition hasn't taken possession of the Keegan Cup for almost a decade and 2006 brought further frustration when they were the latest to suffer from the magnificent surge that Wolfe Tones have made through the ranks in a short space of time. By Paul Clarke.
2005
What if?
In years to come the question will be asked what team beat the eventual senior football champions twice in the one campaign. That achievement is one Navan O'Mahonys would rather cash in on for a tilt at the Keegan Cup. By Liam O'Rourke
2004
Holding their own
Back in the senior ranks after a two-year sojourn at intermediate level, O'Mahonys comfortably retained their status and were within a kick of the ball of making the knockout stages.
2003
The boys are back in town
Navan O'Mahony's marked the Golden Jubilee of their first Keegan Cup success by regaining their senior status after two tough years in the intermediate ranks.
2002
So near but maybe not so far
Though the year ended in disappointment for Navan O'Mahony's first teams in both hurling and football, there are grounds for optimism for 2003. However, looking at the bigger picture Club Chairman, Louis Kinsella feels clubs deserve a better deal form the County Board.
2001
Delaney Cup stays in blue ribbons
They say good teams win championships, great teams retain them. It is also true to say that once you get to the top, the hardest thing is to stay there. Navan O'Mahonys reached the Delaney Cup summit last year and this term they scaled those dizzy heights again. Brendan Boylan charts the glorious journey.
2000
Back on Brews Hill
The Delaney Cup winged its way back to O'Mahonys after a 20 year wait. Too long of a wait judging by the talent on offer in the Navan club.
1999
The post master
When interviewed for Royal County 1996, former Meath and O'Mahonys forward Finian Murtagh had the following words to say about Paddy O'Brien:
1998
Embarrassment of riches
When it comes to underage success, O'Mahony's have no peers at present. We take a look at their wins in football, hurling, camogie and ladies football. Need we say any more.
   

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Rathkenny
2010
Rathkenny revelation
The last four in the 2010 Meath SFC was made up of three teams who had celebrated with the Keegan Cup in the previous six years. Rathkenny were the exceptions with the wearers of the red and black making a remarkable turnaround to come so close to ousting holders Seneschalstown just a few months after being concerned in relegation strife.
2009
Survival of the fittest
Rathkenny's survival instincts were at work again in the 2009 Senior Football Championship as they defeated Walterstown in dramatic fashion in a relegation play-off to preserve their status in the top flight before an appeal made things complicated. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Senior status sustained and minors victorious
2008 can be looked on in a few different ways. I would hope that a club which retains its senior status and wins a minor league final, (in a year when we are playing as one club for the first time in many years), as well as having a county star in Brian Meade, a County Chairman in Barney Allen, and a senior championship winner in David Donegan (with McAnespies in Boston he won the North American Championship), can be regarded as a good year indeed. By club PRO Gerry Gavagan.
2007
Revelling in the top flight
Though Rathkenny's first year back in the Senior Football Championship ended with a heavy quarter-final defeat against Dunboyne, they certainly proved beyond doubt that they are more than fit for life in the top flight.
2006
Rathkenny in wonderland
ÔMagical win for Rathkenny ends barren 72 years' was the heading over one report of the 2006 Meath Intermediate Football Championship final after a team which was totally unconsidered early in the year went away with the Mattie McDonnell Cup. By Noel Coogan.
2005
League honours were thoroughly deserved
Rathkenny made 2005 a year to remember by scooping the all-county Division Four ÔA' league title on the last Saturday of September. Full forward Richie Timmons, who delivered seven of his side's eleven-point tally in the defeat of Kilbride at Walterstown, reflects on a satisfactory year for the Red & Black.
2004
Rathkenny youth cause optimism
On the surface, not a lot changed for Rathkenny this past year. They remain in the Intermediate Championship for 2005 and also in Division 4 of the All County A Leagues.
2003
Reid the script
It's been one of those years for the Rathkenny club, sprinkles of radiance overshadowed by bucket loads of insipidness. They just didn't leave the traps in 2003.
2002
Back home
In years to come Rathkenny folk will no doubt mull over David Heery's GAA travels in the comfort of their clubhouse.
2001
Steady Eddie
Rathkenny may not be regulars in the winners' enclosure but they've got their fair quota of staunch GAA people nonetheless as we discovered when he bumped into long-time stalwart Eddie Bellew.
2000
Rathkenny revel in U14 success
The future of Rathkenny GFC appears to be in safe hands if their performances in the Under 14 grade this year is anything to go by. Here, the team's coach, John Martin, relives the successful campaign.
1999
Rathkenny ‘C' bright future
The Rathkenny club celebrated the capture of the Junior ‘C' crown during the past twelve months. Here we examine how they got their hands on the silverware.
1998
A family tradition
Certain families are naturally associated with clubs, as Royal County discovered when he tracked Paddy Timmons down.
   

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Rathmolyon
2011
Pearle backs Rathmolyon to recover from double disappointment
There was double disappointment for Rathmolyon in the space of a week in October when they lost both the IHC and Division 1 league finals to Boardsmill and Kildalkey respectively. However, one of the clubÕs unsung heroes, the evergreen Terry Pearle, is confident they will bounce back in 2012.
2010
A big change for Rathmolyon
Just four years after they experienced the thrill of winning the Senior Hurling Championship, Rathmolyon lost their status in the top flight when one of the best players the club has ever produced guided Navan OÕMahonys to victory in the relegation final. By Paul Clarke.
2009

Rathmolyon ready for a real go
After the joy and satisfaction of snatching victory from the jaws of defeat in the 2006 final against Dunboyne, Rathmolyon's efforts to get back to the Senior Hurling Championship final have met with disappointment and frustration.

2008
Chasing Jubilee
It must have been a strange day for John Gorry when Rathmolyon faced Dunboyne in a Senior Hurling Championship quarter-final at Ashbourne on the third Sunday of September this year. He was at the helm for the St Peter's men during so many near misses in their bid for the Jubilee Cup, but here he was in the opposite corner for his native Rathmolyon attempting to plot DunboyneÕs downfall.
2007
Champions go down with a fight
There's no substitute for class and experience and Mike Cole used both in abundance during the 2007 Senior Hurling Championship as he did everything in his power to guide Rathmolyon to a second successive Jubilee Cup and a fourth in 15 years.
2006
Come on the village
The most dramatic conclusion to any Meath GAA final in 2006 was in the Senior Hurling Championship decider when Rathmolyon snatched the title from the grasp of Dunboyne with a sensational goal in added time at the end of an entertaining encounter. By Noel Coogan
2005
Fate conspires against Rathmolyon
It's fast approaching a decade since Rathmolyon last won the Meath Senior Hurling Championship and there were times during the campaign gone by when the club's supporters might have been tempted to think that a nine-year gap just might be bridged
2004
The long distance hurler
If George Bagnall decides at some stage in the future to put pen to paper and catalogue his lengthy loyalty to the Rathmolyon cause, only one title will suffice: ‘The loneliness of the long distance hurler'.
2003
Cole comfort
Ten years on from their first ever senior championship success, Rathmolyon's hurlers found themselves in a battle to avoid relegation in 2003.
2002
Getting stuck in
Women occupying positions on GAA club executives were almost as rare as hens teeth up to a few years ago, but the trend of male-dominated committees is gradually changing and more females are getting involved in the running of clubs all over the country.
2001
Rathmolyon under 14s make history
In a year when the Rathmolyon senior hurlers failed to build on their performances in 2000, it was left to the club's under 14s to provide the highlight. Club chairman Declan Regan looks back on the year's happenings.
2000
No more unlucky 13s for Rathmolyon
The year 2000 was a special one for Rathmolyon. The Royal County caught up with the man who was mostly responsible for that.
1999
Rathmolyon hang onto senior status
Nineteen-ninty-nine was one of Rathmolyon's most difficult seasons since the club attained senior status nearly a quarter of a century ago. Club stalwart John Gorry believes that they may have turned the corner, though, as Royal County recently discovered.
1998
Rathmolyon's Marathon man
Royal County talks to Seamus Murray about the possibility of Rathmolyon going the full distance in 1999.
   

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Ratoath
2011
Minor footballers claim first Delaney Cup
The future of football in Ratoath looks extremely bright following the historic success of their minors who brought the Delaney Cup to the club for the first time in the autumn of 2011. It was a triumph which made up for the disappointment of losing last yearÕs final to Navan OÕMahonys and one which demonstrated the value of having sound under-age structures in place.
2010
Youth is the key in Ratoath
When Ratoath lost the 2008 Junior Football Championship final to Moynalvey the hope was that they would bounce back and win the title the following year. It didnÕt happen when they failed to reach the knockout stages and the same happened this year when they accumulated only five points from a possible 10 in their group. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Leinster success for Ratoath hurlers
Ratoath lost three Meath junior championship finals in the last two years, and although disappointed again at the end of the 2009 JHC decider against Kildalkey, there was some compensation with outright success gained in the Leinster JHL. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Final heartbreak
Ratoath's bid to make an instant return to the intermediate grade ended in bitter disappointment when they under-performed in the Junior Football Championship final against Moynalvey at Pairc Tailteann in late September and suffered a comprehensive defeat.
2007
Young stars of Ratoath
A fabulous historic double of championship and league successes by the under-14 footballers was a glowing highlight of the year for Ratoath GAA Club and demonstrated that the highly talented young players are being produced who will secure a bright future.
2006
Growing, growing, growing
Ratoath went for one of the most respected authorities in the game to manage their Intermediate Football Championship team in 2006 but, unfortunately, they didn't manage to mount a serious challenge for a place in the knockout stages, though they gave a good account of themselves and were seriously hampered by injuries which worked against them in a big way.
2005
Big breakthrough at underage level
Ratoath's U14s made light work of playing in Division One for the first time, storming to the 2005 all-county U14 Div 1 FL crown with a series of superb performances Ð the club's first top-flight juvenile title. Dub Clive O'Reilly of Na Fianna fame (who took charge of the team in conjunction with Marty Mannering and Dermot Rooney) thoroughly enjoyed his first stint in juvenile management and was delighted to contribute to a historic breakthrough for his adopted club.
2004
Double delight
With advances and progression the name of the game both on and off the pitch, Ratoath scaled new heights in 2004.
2003
Laying the foundation stone
Ratoath may have suffered disappointment at the final hurdle in the Junior Football Championship, but they can certainly look back on 2003 as a highly progressive year, both on and off the field.
2002
Ratoath on the up
According to the most recent census Ratoath has seen an 88 per cent explosion in population in the past six years, posing all sorts of challenges for the village and its sporting bodies. Brian Hayes - a relative newcomer to the area - tells how the GAA club is responding to the challenge.
2001
Complementary progress
Want to finger a club which boasts a catchment area of rich potential, a burgeoning well of player numbers and the sort of work-in-progress off the field befitting All-Ireland club champions? Look no further than Ratoath GAA.
2000
The money Man
As a player, team mentor and officer, Paddy Dolan, who was Ratoath's Sean Gael recipient this year, has given Ratoath GAA club a lifetime of distinguished service. Here the current club treasurer talks to Royal County about days past and his ambitions for the future of the club.
1999
Ratoath move closer to the dream
Although still at an early stage, the development of Ratoath's new club grounds is taking shape. Confident that the blue and golds will be plying their trade in new surroundings within two years is Club Secretary, Rose Moore.
1998
A man for all seasons
Martin Lynch is a top soccer coach. He's also from Dublin. An obvious choice then as manager of the Ratoath gaelic football team! As Royal County reveals, he's done a great job, living up to his own high standards.
   

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Seneschalstown
2011
Common sense from Seneschalstown
A bit of common sense goes a long way in any walk of life and Seneschalstown GAA club is certainly adopting a sensible approach to life, protecting its future carefully by investing great endeavour into its juvenile structure. In 2011, more hard graft was put in at underage level. An ultra-busy juvenile section should ensure that Seneschalstown is not just a club with a great history but also one with a bright future. We spoke to juvenile chairman Ian Maguire about the ongoing work.
2010
No two-in-a-row despite all the goals
Seneschalstown just fell short in their attempt to become the seventh club to lift the Keegan Cup in successive years when losing out to Skryne by the narrowest margin in a memorable Meath SFC final on the last Sunday of September.
2009
Keegan returns as Seneschalstown pace themselves to perfection
Seneschalstown made the most of scraping through to the last eight of the 2009 Commons Hardware Meath Senior Football Championship by improving considerably in the home straight to claim the title for the second time in three years and their fourth overall. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Back to back Feis Cups
Defending a championship title is difficult, but when playing resources are diminished through injury it's impossible, as Seneschalstown found out in 2008. Still there was the consolation of retaining the Feis Cup after a memorable extra time win over Dunboyne. By Liam OÕRourke.
2007
Yellow Furze delight
When Cormac Quinn wrapped his powerful arms around the Keegan Cup as the light began to fade at Pairc Tailteann on the first Sunday of November, the scene illuminated the lives of so many people who had worked towards that glorious moment.
2006
More consistency required
Anybody walking into the Dunsany GAA grounds on the first Sunday evening of September, 2006 could have been forgiven for thinking they were looking at the county champions in the blue and yellow jerseys, such was the confidence, authority, fluency and accuracy of Seneschalstown's performance in the opening half. By Paul Clarke.
2005
U14s were a Furze to be reckoned with
One of the most impressive teams in Seneschalstown in 2005 was the U14s, who claimed the Division Three league crown and also reached the semi-final stage of the Division Two championship. Senior club secretary Ian Maguire, who managed the side in conjunction with selectors Phonsie Gilsenan and Francis Flynn, was delighted with how the lads stood up over the course of a testing year.
2004
Small steps lead to progress
A decade has passed since Seneschalstown last won the Senior Football Championship and their efforts to bridge the gap met with disappointment in 2004 when they were eliminated at the quarter-final stage by Trim.
2003
More than a lick of paint!
A drive through the village of Kentstown tells its own story - that of an area which is growing rapidly as housing developments appear to shoot up out of the ground almost overnight.
2002
Knocking on the door
After a number of disappointing SFC campaigns, Seneschalstown made their way to the last four in 2002 and that was a fine achievement considering that the team had to put up with much restricted training facilities over the last few months.
2001
Furze Underage finds its feet
Seneschalstown enjoyed a successful year at underage level, with the Yellow Furze under 12 and under 14 teams contesting county finals. Pat Sheridan was involved in coaching the under 12s and was understandably proud of their achievements.
2000
A first for Seneschalstown
Seneschalstown are the undisputed kingpins of Meath Ladies football following their thoroughly deserved final success over Summerhill and judging by their performances this year that appears to be a title they'll hold on to for many years to come.
1999
Father and son
Seneschalstown's very own Graham Geraghty led Meath to All-Ireland glory this year. Royal County talks to his father, Ger, about a memorable twelve months for the Geraghty family.
1998
The original ‘Supersub'
Few have given a more lengthy and loyal contribution to Seneschalstown GFC than Mattie McCabe. Here he talks to Royal County about his playing days with both club and county and what the future holds at the Yellow Furze club.
   

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Simonstown
2011
Simonstown back on track
Having survived a relegation scare in 2010, Simonstown Gaels looked more like their old selves this year when they qualified for the last eight of the SFC. Secretary Barry Gorman was delighted with their change in fortunes and insists there is a lot more to come from Sean BarryÕs young team.
2010
New-look Simonstown hold their own
When Oldcastle defeated St Ultan's in a Senior Football Championship relegation play-off at Ballinlough in early September everybody associated with the Simonstown Gaels' club could emit one collective sigh of relief.
2009
Cruel results sequence halts Simonstown
After a beginning that promised so much, SimonstownÕs championship season ended at the group stage yet again, after the most unlikely sequence of results saw the north Navan side lose out on scoring difference by just two points. It was a frustrating season for the sky blues and former Cavan player Mickey Brennan, who returned from Drumalee in the Breffni County to his roots in Navan last year. By David Sheehan.
2008
Transitional times
After losing out to the eventual winners, Wolfe Tones and Seneschalstown, at the penultimate stage in each of the previous two Meath SFC campaigns, Simonstown Gaels failed to get out of their group in their latest attempt to get their hands on the elusive Keegan Cup.
2007
Silverware on show
Once again it was a case of what might have been for Simonstown Gaels as they fell at the penultimate hurdle in their latest attempt to lift the elusive Keegan Cup. However, there was a consolation prize as Des Lane's charges took outright honours in the Division 2A League. By Noel Coogan.
2006
Northside blues
After falling at the final fence in the race for the Keegan Cup in 2003 and 2004, Simonstown entered the 2006 campaign looking to shed their tag of underachievers but like many sides in the SFC this year, Colm O'Rourke's charges fell victim to the rapid rise of Wolfe Tones at the penultimate hurdle. By David Jennings.
2005
The missing year
The hope of every Simonstown Gaels supporter going into the 2005 Senior Football Championship was undoubtedly that it would turn out to be a case of third time lucky and that the Keegan Cup would make its way to the north Navan club following the final defeats of 2003 and 2004.
2004
More final heartache for Simonstown
A first-ever senior trophy continues to elude Simonstown Gaels. In 2004, the north Navan men returned to the county final stage but were beaten in a second successive SFC decider.
2003
Mixed emotions
It's often said that football is a ‘funny old game'. Simonstown Gaels supporters would surely concur and you can be sure that the players and mentors are of like mind.
2002
Underage scene moves up a gear
The U-12s and U-16s contested championship finals while the jewel in the crown, the U-14s, came agonisingly closing to winning Meath's first ever Feile Peil na nOg title.
2001
Simonstown's Mr. Reliable
Simonstown came perilously close to becoming embroiled in a SFC relegation play-off against Syddan this year before their group play-off success over Ballinlough spared them the indignity. It was too close for comfort for the north Navan gaels and Ronan McGrath is one individual who's eager to avoid a repeat scenario next year.
2000
Worth waiting for ...
Simonstown celebrated a long overdue Under 12 championship success in June of this year. Eddie Maguire was joint-manager, along with Brian Moran, and here he recounts the team's road to glory.
1999
Investing in the Youth
The Simonstown club's motto is ‘mol an oige agus tiocfaidh si'. It's a motto which has served them well in the past and they should reap further rewards in the coming years.
1998
No ordinary Joe soap
The glimmer of hope which existed in the eyes of Simonstown Gaels GFC founding member Joe Clarke in 1965 has fertilised into a bright shining light boasting one of the top GAA clubs in the county. Members of the north Navan club owe a lot to Joe.
   

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Skryne
2011
Lenehan keen to bounce back
Following the highs of last year's Keegan Cup win, Skryne were brought back down to earth in 2011 when they failed to reach the knockout stages of the senior football championship. However, county star Ciaran Lenehan is confident that the blues can bounce back next year.
2010
No unlucky 13 for champions Skryne
When a team scores 21 points in a football match the chances are that they will win comfortably, but such was the nature of this yearÕs thrilling Meath Senior Football Championship final that such a magnificent tally only just saw Skryne past champions Seneschalstown. By Paul Clarke.
2009
One off day in a near perfect season
When Skryne emerged from their group with a 100 per cent winning record in the 2009 Senior Football Championship they looked capable of really troubling the big guns when the serious business of the knockout stages came into play. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Both sides of the league coin
Since the publication of the last yearbook, Skryne finished 2007 on a high note by winning the Division 1 FL title for the first time. However, their hopes of reaching the business end of the SFC this year ended with narrow elimination at the group stages.
2007
Blue is the colour
After failing to reach the closing stages of the Meath SFC in each of the previous two years, having been champions in 2004, Skryne made a little bit of progress this year by getting to the quarter-finals where they lost out to Simonstown Gaels.
2006
Transition time
For a team that brought the Senior Football Championship title to the club for the 12th time in 2004, it has to be regarded as something of a surprise that Skryne haven't managed to reach the knockout stages in the last two campaigns.
2005
A strange follow up
One of the biggest surprises in the 2005 Meath Senior Football Championship was the failure by defending Keegan Cup custodians Skryne to reach the quarter-finals. The Blues won just three of their seven group games and the third enabled them to avoid the embarrassment of figuring in a relegation play-off. By Noel Coogan.
2004
Skryne come good when it matters
Although such an outright triumph did not look likely earlier in the campaign, Skryne came good in the home straight to take the Meath Senior Football Championship title for the 12th time.
2003
Dowd of the Blue
Despite winning seven of their eight senior championship matches, eternal contenders Skryne failed to reach even the last four in 2003.
2002
Looking through the Skryne door
Skryne, we watch them, fear them. In times past The High King of Tara sat upon his throne and also inspected the surrounding countryside from his elevated viewpoint on top of the hill. In more recent years the Hill of Tara has become a place where Skryne footballers are trained to become senior champions.
2001
The silver is not enough
Champions two years ago, last four losers in ‘00 and beaten finalists in 2001, and the underlying feeling in Skryne is one of vast underachievement. Is it now win or bust for a club dogged by expectation?
2000
Skryne 2000 - What went wrong?
Colum Cromwell delves into the history books and finds out that when most is expected of them, Skryne normally flatter to deceive.
1999
Skryne are kingpins for the 11th time
What a year for the Skryne club, two All-Ireland medal winners, two international heroes, and best of all a senior team to be proud of.
1998
On the big Skryne
Skryne returned to winning ways at juvenile level this year with their U-16s collecting the Div. 3 title at the expense of Nobber. Willie Rogan and Dan O'Leary masterminded the success. Former player Willie reveals the secret ingredients behind their winning formula to Royal County.
   

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Slane
2011
Slane turn the corner
Slane captain Shane Coyle believes that things have finally bottomed out for the Boynesiders after their best season in four years, with promotion back to Division 4 accomplished.
2010
Survival is key for Slane
Slane have slipped down the Meath football ladder over the last few years and after a less than distinguished season in 2010, they breathed a big sigh of relief when avoiding dropping another rung out of the junior A ranks.
2009
Getting closer
After slipping out of intermediate ranks in 2006, Slane are finding it difficult to get back up MeathÕs football ladder and in this yearÕs JFC the five points garnered from a possible ten were not sufficient to enable them qualify for the quarter-finals. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Starting from scratch
In their second year back in the ranks of junior football, Slane failed to build on the promise shown in 2007 when reaching the quarter-final stage. This year they failed to get out of their group when only winning one of their four outings in the LynchÕs Pharmacy JFC.
2007
Peaks and valleys
In their first year in the ranks of junior football since 1952 Slane had their hopes of an immediate return to the intermediate grade dashed by Moynalvey at the quarter-final stage of the 2007 JFC, having gone through their group games without suffering a defeat.
2006
A new challenge awaits
Slane escaped the drop after a big scare in 2005, but there was no way out a year later as Na Fianna beat them in the Intermediate Football Championship relegation play-off at Dunsany in mid-October to send them crashing out of the middle grade and down to the junior ranks.
2005
Progress all round
It's only three years ago that Slane reached the semi-finals of the Intermediate Football Championship, yet this year they found themselves in a battle for survival in the second highest grade - a battle that went all the way to a relegation play-off. By Paul Clarke.
2004
Looking forward, not back
It's difficult to believe that two decades have passed since Slane won the Intermediate Football Championship with a final victory over a St. Colmcille's team that included emerging stars in the shape of Bob O'Malley and Bernard Flynn.
2003
The Gough and the tumble
While Slane GFC couldn't be dragged into the dock and accused of setting the world on fire in 2003, they did nonetheless take an important step along the learning curve that all clubs must negotiate to earn a seat at the top table
2002
Slane's three-year itch
It has been a long three years for Slane. Following their relegation down to the Intermediate Championship in 1999 they had hoped to bounce straight back up within 12 months. However for the time being the notorious middle grade remains their competitive home.
2001
Mullery puts his shoulder to the wheel
It's not so long ago that Slane GFC were competing against the cream of the crop in Meath GAA circles. Nothing would give club members more satisfaction than to reclaim their spot amongst the Skryne's, Dunshaughlin's and Dunderry's of this world. Club secretary Jim Mullery spoke with Royal County and outlined the club's ambitions for the future.
2000
Keeping the flag flying
Slane GFC haven't enjoyed too much success at underage level in recent times but the likes of Peter O'Brien continue to persevere.
1999
It's a topsy turvyworld
1999 was a year of mixed emotions for the Slane club and its followers. The All County Division 3 League success was their first adult success since 1993 but their relegation from the senior grade was a bitter pill to swallow.
1998
A bitter sweet Smyphony
Internationally renowned for its rock concerts, Royal County discovers that Wayne Harding would dearly love to see the footballers of Slane grab the headlines instead.
   

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St. Brigids
2011
Early defeats prove costly for BrigidÕs
When the draw for the 2011 Junior Football Championship was made back in the spring St BrigidÕs must have been hopeful that they could make it to the knockout stages, but defeats in their opening two group matches inflicted serious damage and despite an improvement in form they failed to advance. By Paul Clarke.
2010
Onwards and upwards for St. BrigidÕs
St BrigidÕs are bubbling away with near annual progression to the knockout stages of the junior football championship and an underage setup that is the envy of most. With brilliant facilities to boot, the Ballinacree club is certainly one on the up.
2009
A knockout blow for BrigidÕs
After failing to advance from their group of the Meath JFC in 2008, St BrigidÕs reached the quarter-finals this year but bowed out of title contention with a heavy defeat to eventual winners Longwood. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Transition year
After winning the JFC B title in 2006 and then reaching the semi-finals stage in their first year back in the junior A championship, Ballinacree club St BrigidÕs failed to emerge from the group stages in the 2008 race for the Matthew Ginnity Cup.
2007
St. Brigid's aiming to move up the grades
Situated in the north west corner of the county, St Brigid's from Ballinacree is one of Meath's smallest GAA clubs but they held their own in their first year back in the junior A grade in 2007, getting to the semi-finals where they lost to eventual winners Clann na nGael.
2006
Sky blue in the rain
After losing out in the Junior B FC final in 2005, St Brigid's made no mistake this year by going all the way and claiming the title as they became the first holders of the Larry Kearns Cup.
2005
Dream double eludes Ballinacree men
St. Brigid's came tantalizingly close to capturing both the junior B football championship and Division 4 titles in 2005. But their failure to win either prize was a source of great disappointment to leading scorer Tomas Blake.
2004
Silverware returns to Ballinacree
St. Brigid's collected their first piece of silverware in a decade when they saw off Meath Hill in a closely fought Div 5 League final at Kells on Sunday October 17. Fergal Hennessy reviewed the year.
2003
Seeking the promised land
St Brigid's, Ballinacree will have to wait another year to regain their cherished Junior 'A' status, having been beaten at the quarter-final stage of the 'B' competition in 2003. Club secretary Padraic Fanning believes 2004 could be the year when they return to the promised land.
2002
Real spirit
Deep among the rolling green pastures of northwest Meath, a small group of Ballinacree Gaels keep their proud GAA flag flying high.
2001
A Brigids runner
Athletics may be Mick Heery's abiding passion as far as the world of sport is concerned but there'll always be a place for Gaelic football in his heart. That said, all matters pertaining to Ballinacree are very dear to him in fact as we found out in chatting to him.
2000
Moving on up?
St Brigid's of Ballinacree didn't enjoy the best of years in 2000 but according to Niall Hennessy the club's future outlook looks positive so don't be surprised to see them celebrating a Junior championship win in the not to distant future.
1999
St. Brigid's aim for a swift return
A disappointing year for St. Brigid's, Ballinacree culminated in relegation to the junior ranks. Team selector George Plunkett informs Royal County of the club's burning ambition to make a quick return to intermediate status in the season ahead.
1998
The belief in Brigids
Peter Farrelly represented Meath and London in championship football, but his priorities always lay with St. Brigids. Royal County talks to the affable football-aholic
   

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St. Colmcilles
2011
U14s steal the show
In a year when their intermediate team once again underachieved, St. ColmcilleÕs looked to their underage teams and, in particular, their talented under 14s for encouragement as club chairman and former star Oliver ÔJackserÕ Kavanagh explains.
2010
The life of Reilly
While St ColmcilleÕs may have underachieved in 2010 by failing to reach the knockout stages of the IFC, their star player Graham Reilly made the breakthrough on the inter-county stage and his relays his fairytale season to David Jennings.
2009
Junior C side end 21-year wait
Although St ColmcilleÕs exited the IFC at the quarter-final stage, there was some consolation for the seaside club with the second string gaining outright honours in the Junior C FC, the clubÕs first adult championship triumph in 21 years.
2008
25 and 50 years ago
Eleven years after the St Colmcille's club was formed they made a highly significant breakthrough by winning the Junior Football Championship in 1983 with a team that included two young players who were soon to become household names not alone in Meath, but on the national GAA scene.
2007
Mixing the good with the bad
Although St Colmcille's qualified from their five-team section of the Lagan Group IFC, they finished that campaign on a low note when going down surprisingly to an 11 points defeat to St Ultan's in a preliminary quarter-final played under lights at Pairc Tailteann.
2006
Plenty of talent by the sea
While the men's football team may not have delivered on their potential, there were enough encouraging signs within the St. Colmcille's club to prove that the east-Meath outfit is certainly moving in the right direction.
2005
Seasiders make waves
St. Colmcille's are expected to be among the leading contenders for intermediate football championship honours in 2006 after reaching their first semi-final in many years this season. Veteran full forward Mickey Conlon believes that with greater consistency, they could be operating at senior level before long.
2004
The production line keeps on rolling
So many other clubs around the county will undoubtedly have taken note of the significant strides St. Colmcille's have been making in recent times and that was certainly in evidence during 2004 when they highlighted another progressive year by winning the Under-16 Football Championship.
2003
Young and able
St. Colmcille's club was formed in 1971 and in 1973 they captured their first success at under-14 level. Thirty years later the sons of some of the panel of 1973 returned the compliment, delivering an U-14 Division 1 title to the club.
2002
A busy year
Success in the Reserve League Div. 2 proved to be the highlight of the 2002 season for the St. Colmcille's adult football club.
2001
Sky blue heaven
There's nothing like an underage win to give everyone associated with a club a big boost. The gaels of St Colmcille's know this only too well having enjoyed some notable underage triumphs in recent years. This year's U-12 Division I success was particularly sweet. Team manager Colm Hilliard recounts his side's march to glory.
2000
‘Cilles on the comeback
When those entrusted with the task of selecting the Meath GAA ‘Club of the Year' award sit down to choose the 2000 recipient, St Colmcille's will undoubtedly feature high amongst the list of candidates.
1999
A minor disappointment
St. Colmcille's failed to make an impression in this year's Intermediate championship but, according to club chairman and minor manager Finbarr Ronan, there is light at the end of the tunnel. A wealth of underage talent promises to propel the seaside club back amongst the elite of the Royal County club scene.
1998
A club reborn
Bettystown outfit St. Colmcilles have had their fair share of troubles in recent times, but according to intermediate manager Dermot Hilliard, they're on the way back.
   

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St. Cuthberts
2011
Minor and U16 honours for St Cuthberts
The hard work at St CuthbertÕs continues, with impressive displays in a number of age grades.
2010
Fantastic year for St CuthbertÕs
Since the formation of St CuthbertÕs Bohermeen in 1983, there have been very few years when some of the teams have not won silverware. However no year can compare to the success in 2010 when no fewer than 10 competitions have been won by the various sides. The u-14 team led the way as they won four county titles while the u-12 and u-16 squads were both successful twice. The u-17 team won their respective league while the players from the u-10's won their section of the well organised North Meath league in Drumconrath.
2009
St CuthbertÕs going strong
After celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the founding of St CuthbertÕs Bohermeen in 2008, it was felt that maybe 2009 might be a bit quieter. However events both on and off the field were just as hectic as club secretary John Kavanagh explains:

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St. Marys
2011
Encouraging signs for St. MaryÕs
While another year in the Junior ÔBÕ championship may await them, there were signs in 2011 that St. MaryÕs have turned the corner and are ready to climb back up the football ladder again.
2010
That winning feeling returns to St. MaryÕs
After a few difficult years in the Junior Championship St MaryÕs took the decision to seek regrading to the Junior B ranks for 2010 and their first campaign in the lower grade brought them as far as the semi-finals where they were eliminated by Moynalty. By Paul Clarke.
2009

Commitment is not wanting
The members of St Mary's GFC reminisced on four decades of activity when they celebrated their 40th anniversary in the CityNorth Hotel earlier this year and the happenings of 1979 surely generated much discussion and plenty of happy memories.

2008
Huge investment in underage football in Donore
The work which will secure a bright and successful future for St Mary's GFC was tackled with enthusiasm and determination during 2008 and all involved are to be applauded for their efforts to promote Gaelic football among the youngest age groups in the club.
2007
Patience is the key
After a year of contrasting fortunes in league and championship in 2006, St. Mary's probably went into '07 with the aim of achieving greater consistency and with a burning desire to at least reach the knockout stages of the Junior Football Championship.
2006
Contrasting fortunes
St. Mary's certainly experienced contrasting fortunes in league and championship football during 2006. Their form in the A League Div. 4 was so consistent that it brought them all the way to the final, but the Junior Championship was dramatically different as they managed just one victory from seven group matches and finished tied at the bottom with St. Vincent's on two points.
2005
Steady progress
St. Mary's have a passionate desire to experience that winning feeling in the Junior Football Championship again, but there was further disappointment in the campaign gone by when they were eliminated in a preliminary quarter-final by a Drumbaragh side which demonstrated considerable improvement on the previous year.
2004
Pipped at the post
St. Mary's would undoubtedly have liked to mark the 25th anniversary of their memorable Junior Football Championship triumph in 1979 by regaining the title this year, but it wasn't to be as they failed to reach the knockout stages after a generally disappointing campaign.
2003
Junior hopes put on ice
St Mary's had high expectations for 2003, but one brief lapse effectively cost them a place in the knockout stages of this year's junior football championship.
2002
In search of Victory
St. Mary's prospects of claiming a first Junior Football Championship title since 1979 were seriously undermined by the loss of several key players for the 2002 campaign, but the Donore club remains upbeat about the future and hopes are high that the coming year can be significantly better given any sort of luck at all.
2001
St. Mary's look to the youth
It may have been a disappointing year for the St. Mary's first team but the future could still have a silver lining according to Pat Lenehan, junior selector and manager of the club's highly-rated under 17 team.
2000
Craven for success
St Mary's are still struggling to make it back to the Intermediate ranks they departed four years ago. Niall Craven believes the club has to get a few things right before that situation will change.
1999
A glimmer of hope
The Under 14 footballers of St. Mary's generated much optimism for the club's future when they captured the Division 4 League title. Here we talk to Francis Gogarty, manager of the successful team, about beating Bective in the final, losing the championship decider to Yellow Furze and what this success means to the club.
1998
Been there done that
He enjoyed the good times, he braved the bad but one characteristic unified Liam Smith's career with St Mary's and Meath. That characteristic, which will never die, was his sheer love for the game.
   

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St. Michaels
2011
Underage success lifts St. MichaelÕs
In a year when their emigration-hit intermediate team failed to live up to expectations, St. MichaelÕs looked to their underage sides for inspiration and they certainly didnÕt disappoint with minor and under 16 league honours coming their way.
2010
One step further for St. MichaelÕs
Although progressing one step further in the Meath IFC than in the previous two years, there was disappointment again for St MichaelÕs when bowing out at the semi-final stage with a narrow defeat to local rivals Carnaross.
2009
Quarter-final ending for second successive year
After running eventual winners St UltanÕs to two points in a 2008 IFC quarter-final clash, St MichaelÕs looked a good bet to progress further this year. However, that was not to be as they fell at the same hurdle when losing to Kilmainhamwood. By Noel Coogan.
2008
Brilliant end to the year
When St Michael's lost their first two group games in the 2008 Intermediate Football Championship it looked odds on that they would end up in a battle for survival in the grade just three years after winning the junior title, but instead they picked things up to earn a quarter-final place and also claim the Division 3 FL title.
2007
Ladies lead the way
There were plenty of red and black flags around Carlanstown and Kilbeg in the autumn of 2005 when the St. Michael's men won the Junior Football Championship and there was a fair amount of colour this year too as the club's ladies scored a thoroughly merited victory in their JFC.
2006
League success
The main aim for any club which moves up a grade is to maintain that status for the following year. St Michael's, Junior A champions in 2005, achieved that goal with considerable ease and had fortune been with them on occasion, the Carlanstown outfit could well have been involved in the business end of the intermediate championship.
2005
St. Michael's land the big prize
Of all the triumphant scenes that followed county finals during 2005, one surely stands out more than any other. St. Michael's had beaten Navan O'Mahonys to win the Junior Football Championship for the first time since 1982 and everybody appeared to want to congratulate one of the greatest Meath players of all time.
2004
A step away from the final
St. Michael's can look back on 2004 with a great deal of satisfaction, despite missing out on Junior ‘A' Football Championship honours, Ollie Cassidy reviewed the year.
2003
Football ladder
St. Michael's desperately want to move back up the football ladder, but their hopes of doing so in 2003 were dashed at the quarter-final stage in the Junior Championship when a highly talented Wolfe Tones side beat them by six points at Kells.
2002
Better late than never!
Free-scoring St. Michael's attacker Daithi Regan was drafted onto the Meath Senior panel for the first time in 2002, making numerous appearances in the National League. Here he reviews his debut season with the ‘Royals' and runs the rule over St. Michael's mixed fortunes in the Junior Championship.
2001
Out on a high
In the times that are in it, clubs often find it difficult to secure some continuity as far as the top table is concerned. In most GAA clubs, it's a case of musical chairs from one AGM to another. At the St. Michael's club, however, they've had the same chairman for the last 13 years. Gabriel Curtis take a bow.
2000
U-16's point direction to bright horizon
It was not all doom and gloom in St Michael's during 2000. Okay, so junior football in 2001 may not appeal to a club with such a proud tradition but the performances of their U16s in capturing the Division 4 crown suggests that more adult success may be just around the corner. Royal County talks to Juvenile chairman Jimmy Farrelly who was also a selector with the victorious team.
1999
Tom puts his thumb on it
St. Michaels return to the Intermediate grade this year didn't have the happy ending that supporters of the Carlanstown club had hoped for. Shane O'Brien caught up with long serving defender Tom Halpin who offered his opinions as to why St. Michaels failed to make the knockout stages of the championship.
1998
The stuff that Dreams are made of
St. Michael's has proven to be a home from home for Jim O'Reilly. Royal County chews the fat with a North Meath stalwart.
   

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St. Pats
2011
Perhaps the best year ever for St. PatÕs
When St PatrickÕs commenced their SFC campaign with a victory over Walterstown and followed that with a win against defending champions Skryne they looked to be well on course for a place in the knockout stages, but two minimum margin defeats followed which derailed their qualification prospects.
2010
PatÕs secure in their senior status
St PatrickÕs are a team which nobody dares to take for granted in the Senior Football Championship, but after achieving some highly commendable results in last yearÕs race for the Keegan Cup and reaching the knockout stages they were less successful in 2010 and didnÕt progress beyond the group phase.
2009

Pushing to get through to the last four
Over the last few years St PatrickÕs have consistently reached the last eight or nine of the Meath SFC but advancing to the final four has proved beyond them. In 2009 the Stamullen side again qualified from the group stages before losing to Summerhill in a closely contested quarter-final. By Noel Coogan.

2007
Injuries take their toll on Pat's
St. Patrick's hopes of reaching their fourth senior football championship quarter-final in five years were ruined by a crippling injury list according to their long-serving defender Niall Russell who, along with former county star Cormac Murphy, announced his retirement in the wake of the play-off defeat to Navan O'Mahony's.
2006
Close to ending the quarter-final bogey
Although St Patrick's were the form team going into the knockout stages of the Commons Hardware Meath SFC, and they finished the group phase with the best score difference (plus 43 points), they bowed out when losing to Wolfe Tones at the quarter-final stage.
2005
Sullivan's travels
Cormac Sullivan was his usual assured self at the heart of the St Patrick's midfield in 2005, as the Stamullen men blazed their way to the knockout stage of the county SFC, only to come unstuck with a disappointing quarter-final defeat to Dunboyne at Ratoath on Sunday September 11. Gerry Robinson spoke to the former Meath goalie about the Pats' impressive group campaign and the increased expectations that go hand-in-hand with improved form.
2004
Making hurling history
The strongholds of hurling in Meath have generally been based in the south of the county, but a club from the east made a very noteworthy and satisfactory breakthrough in 2004 when St. Patrick's won their first adult title in the small ball code.
2003
Closing in on that shamrock day
St. Patrick's didn't win the Meath Senior Football Championship in 2003, but their campaign certainly represented one of the success stories in the race for the Keegan Cup.
2002
“Not so bad after all”
St. Patrick's will look ahead to the 2003 season in the hope that they can make a much greater impact in the Senior Football Championship after enduring a less than smooth campaign in 2002 when circumstances didn't work in their favour.
2001
St.Pat's comfortably hold their own
St. Patrick's made their long-awaited return in the senior ranks this year and came tantalizingly close to qualifying for the knock-out stages. Club stalwart Myra O'Flaherty believes that it was a satisfactory year for the Stamullen outfit.
2000
St. Patrick's are Intermediate champions ... at last
‘Perseverance brings success' was the title of the Walterstown club's comprehensive history which was published in the mid 1980's. If the maxim applied to Walterstown, then it is even more appropriate for the patient footballers of St. Patricks.
1999
Ivan-ho No!
Royal County talks to St. Pats veteran Ivan Curran about another disappointing year for the Stamullen club and their prospects of gaining that elusive championship win in the not too distant future.
1998
The final hurdle
St Patricks are to the 90s what Dunderry were in the 80s, an Intermediate final nightmare. Royal County reviews the year and argues the future is bright.
   

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St. Pauls
2011
PaulÕs and proud
After their run to last yearÕs JFC ÔBÕ quarter-final, St. PaulÕs had high hopes of building on that this year. Alas, it wasnÕt to be, but key forward Fergal OÕNeill refuses to be disheartened and is convinced that better days lie ahead.
2010
A step in the right direction for St. PaulÕs
The last few years have been difficult for St PaulÕs with all the uncertainty over where they could call home, but the clubÕs footballers gave their supporters a fair bit to cheer about during the 2010 Junior B Championship as they successfully negotiated the group stages. By Paul Clarke.
2009
PaulÕs aim for a home of their own
Ten years ago St. PaulÕs were promoted to intermediate level but in the intervening time they have moved back two grades of football. A win over this yearÕs JFC ÔBÕ champions shows they are capable of making the step up, all they need now is for the council to give them planning permission for a new pitch in Clonee. By David Sheehan.
2008
Trials and tribulations
After a year that must have been difficult, disruptive and somewhat sad in 2007, St Paul's made good progress in the Junior B Football Championship this term, so much so that they advanced from the divisional stages to play knockout football in late summer.
2007
End of one road for St Paul's
St. Paul's this year bade an emotional farewell to their pitch in Clonee which is situated on the site of the new M3 Motorway. Despite being without a home, the club is determined to carry on as chairman and junior team selector John Curry explains.
2006
Pauls on parade
St. Paul's managed three victories and a draw in Group A of the 2006 Junior B Football Championship, but a tally of seven points in the qualifying stages wasn't sufficient to earn the Clonee side a place in the business end of the competition. By Paul Clarke.
2005
St. Pauls never stop
There's no other GAA pitch in Meath that experiences the volumes of traffic passing by its gates on a daily basis than that of St Paul's. Yet, paradoxically, St Paul's are largely an unknown entity in Meath GAA circles. By Gordon Manning.
2004
A brighter note
St. Paul's suffered their second successive relegation in the league in 2004 (having dropped down from Div 3 the previous year) and will ply their trade in Division 5 next year.
2003
Watch us go next year!
Nothing went according to plan for St Pauls in 2003 but the team spirit and sense of camaraderie amongst the club is such that centre forward Philip Connolly forecasts a dramatic return to form for the Clonee men in the coming season.
2002
All change for St. Pauls
After two years competing at intermediate level St. Paul's were relegated to junior ranks at the end of 2001, instead of bouncing back, a combination of injuries and defections saw the Clonee side barely hold onto Junior A status.
2001
Through the trapdoor
St Paul's were all set to enjoy life after breaking out of the junior ranks in 1999. But in just their second year as an intermediate side, they could not evade the dreaded drop, and will be back as a junior side next summer.
2000
Moyles better
South Meath club St Paul's enjoyed a relatively successful first season in the intermediate grade, consolidating their position in the championship before going on to win the league late in the year. Predictably, county man Anthony Moyles was again one of their key men in 2000.
1999
St. Paul's bypass Junior grade
St. Paul's arrived in the big time this year when they got their hands on the Matthew Ginnity Cup. Royal County reports on an historic year for the Clonee club.
1998
Donnelly the sponsor
Royal County meets Martin Donnelly who finds time out from a hectic schedule which sees him treble up as sponsor of the Clare footballers, the Poc Fada and St. Paul's.
   

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St. Ultans
2011
UltanÕs retain status
St. UltanÕs PRO Tom Lynch is refusing to blame emigration for a difficult 2011 which saw the club avoid relegation to the junior ranks by virtue of a relegation playoff victory over parish rivals Cortown.
2010

UltanÕs bow out, but theyÕll be back
That memorable day at Pairc Tailteann in the autumn of 2008 seemed a long time ago on the first Saturday of September this year when St UltanÕs concluded a very difficult Senior Football Championship campaign by surrendering their status in the top flight. By Paul Clarke.

2009
UltanÕs have no problems mixing it with the best
Teams promoted from the Intermediate ranks always relish the challenge that mixing it with the big boys brings, but facing up to and matching that challenge thrown down by more experienced and battle-hardened sides is always a tough task. By David Sheehan.
2008
Welcome to the top table
The tension was high around the dressing room area under the stand at Pairc Tailteann approaching 4.0 on the first Sunday of October this year. Parish rivals St Ultan's and Cortown were preparing to race out onto the beautifully manicured Navan pitch for surely the most talked-about IFC final in the history of the competition.
2007
Pushing hard for a double promotion
As St. Ultan's review their first campaign back in the intermediate ranks they can certainly take encouragement for the years ahead as they aim to make that giant step up to play with the big boys in the Senior Football Championship. By Paul Clarke.
2006
Bohermeen men
A number of teams from Bohermeen parish have won the Meath Junior Football Championship down the decades and St Ultan's were picking up the title for the second time in seven years when becoming the latest recipients of the Matthew Ginnity Cup in October. By Noel Coogan.
2005
Good, but not quite good enough
St Ultan's launched a two-pronged attack on silverware in 2005. Though they lost only four competitive matches over the course of the season and were in the shake-up for honours in both the league (Division Three) and the JFC, the Bohermeen Black & Green finished the year empty-handed, much to the frustration of gifted attacker Paul Murray.
2004
The team to beat
St Ultan's gained promotion from Div 4 of the league and bowed out of the Junior ‘A' Football Championship, when they went under to eventual winners Ratoath in the quarter-finals. Colm Travers reviewed an eventful year for the club.
2003
Hurt yet proud
They are still trying to pick up the pieces around Bohermeen. Still trying to figure out where it all went wrong, why it all went wrong in 2003. St Ultan's are a proud club, and relegation to junior football has hurt.
2002
St Ultan's family affair
During a period nearly a century ago, a team called Bohermeen made winning the Meath senior football title look as simple as taking sweets off a baby. They won the championship six-years in a row between 1909 and 1914. Since then no other club managed a similar sequence of success.
2001
Rogers revels in saintly role
Amidst the highly-vaunted, bright young football talent at St. Ultan's, Gary Rogers stands out as one of the brightest. A run with the Meath seniors and a central role with the Meath juniors reflects his innate promise.
2000
St. Ultan's bounce back
Football people in the Bohermeen/Martry area are united as one happy family following the Junior Football Championship triumph by St. Ultan's last September.
1999
Back in the limelight
Following a few years in the wilderness, St. Ultan's returned to the Meath Ladies roll of honour this year after capturing the Intermediate Football Championship crown. Team manager Jim Fitzsimons relives the profitable year.
1998
Hope never dies
1998 was supposed to be a good year for St. Ultans after a promising ‘97. Vincent Rennicks explains to Royal County where things went wrong and offers the opinion that dedication will bring success.
   

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St. Vincents
2011
Silverware for St. VincentÕs
In a year when they narrowly missed out on a place in the JFC ÔBÕ final, silverware came St. VincentÕs way in the form of a Division 5 league title, making John SheridanÕs return to the managerÕs position a successful one.
2010
VincentÕs pushing hard for that breakthrough
St VincentÕs bid to get back to the Junior B Football Championship final met with disappointment again in 2010 when they were eliminated at the penultimate hurdle by TrimÕs second string after they had pulled off a dramatic victory over St PaulÕs in the quarter-finals. By Paul Clarke.
2009
St VincentÕs left reeling in Ôwhat might have beenÕ
Widely regarded as one to watch in the Junior B Football Championship this term, especially after securing the services of Martin Barry, St VincentÕs didnÕt scale the heights that most predicted but David Jennings reflected on how lady luck failed to shine on them in 2009.
2008
The final fence
After experiencing all the joy, excitement and elation that goes with winning the title in dramatic fashion five year earlier, St Vincent's were at the receiving end in the Junior B FC final in 2008 when the Donaghmore/Ashbourne second string defeated them on a wet Saturday at Pairc Tailteann.
2007
Vincent's junior assignment failed
St Vincent's have a proud tradition in footballing circles but 2007 proved a frustrating year for the Ardcath club as they were forced to suffer the unfortunate fate of being relegated to the ranks of Junior B.
2006
Mixing it with the big boys
An unfortunate run of narrow defeats, three of them by a single point, ruined St. Vincent's chances of making it through to the knock-out stages of the Junior Football Championship, but at least the Ardcath side maintained their status in the battle for the Matthew Ginnity Cup for another year and can live in hope that 2007 will bring better fortunes.
2005
Ardcath alive
St Vincent's hit the headlines when capturing the 2005 Meath U14 FL Division 3B title, beating Dunsany in the final on May 23. It was a landmark victory for the Ardcath outfit, who are engaged in an ongoing battle against unforgiving demographics. Hopes are high that further success will follow as the plucky Vincents endeavour to thrive against all odds.
2004
A shining example
St. Vincent's retained their the Junior ‘A' football status for another year when they defeated Moynalty in a relegation play-off at the tail end of the seasons. Chairman Gerry Tuite, and juvenile secretary Ambrose O'Sullivan reviewed the year.
2003
Late penalty
The Junior B FC decider provided the most dramatic conclusion to any of the Meath championship finals in 2003 with St Vincent's snatching the title in sensational fashion with a late, late goal from a penalty.
2002
A step in the right direction
The winds of change may have started to blow around Ardcath in the past year. The St. Vincent's footballers reached the semi-final of the junior B championship, the final of Division Five in the league and claimed their first under-12 title in 22 years.
2001
Ardcath's Hill
Even in success-spoiled Meath, rich pastures don't entirely dominate the county's football landscape. Amidst all the rich oasis of the big ball game in the Royal County, areas like Ardcath yearn for a place in the sun - at least just the odd time.
2000
The fast lane
Shay Lane was better known to everybody as “Shortie”. Born and raised in Duleek in the 1950s, he showed even at an early age great potential on the football field. He was part of the Duleek U14 team that won county titles in 1970 and 1971.
1999
St.Vincent's remain upbeat
Highlights were few and far between for St. Vincent's in 1999. Hopeful of an upswing in fortunes in the coming season is youthful club secretary, John Tuite.
1998
No Bowens about it
St. Vincent's Ardcath haven't been enjoying the best of times recently. Royal County asks chairman Pat Bowens what the reasons behind their poor form are and about the chances of them bouncing back in the not to distant future.
   

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Summerhill
2011
Champions once more
Paraic Lyons must have been tired listening to people reminding him that he was the last Summerhill captain to be presented with the Keegan Cup. To the delight off all involved with the club that distinction now rests with Tony McDonnell after he led them to a first SFC title in 25 years during 2011. By Paul Clarke.
2010
County and club calling
When Royal County made contact with Meath PRO Ann McDonnell for this interview she was in Costello Print putting the finishing touches to the match programme for Skryne's Leinster Club SFC semi-final clash against Rhode of Offaly.
2009
A top four side
SummerhillÕs long wait for a return to the top of the Meath football charts continues after they fell at the penultimate round in the race for the Keegan Cup in 2009. For the second time in three years Seneschalstown dashed their title hopes.
2008
You have to lose one before you win one
It was inevitable that sooner rather than later somebody was going to suffer at the hands of Navan O'Mahonys in an SFC final . Unfortunately for Summerhill it was them as the Brews Hill team made up for defeats at the last hurdle in the previous two years by beating the other Hill XV in the 2008 decider.
2007
All set to deliver
After spending a few years fighting survival battles, Summerhill are moving in the right direction again and in 2007 qualifying for the quarter-finals of the SFC was significant progress for their young side.
2006
20 years on
Twenty years ago Paraic Lyons was basking in that sunny feeling that comes with leading your club to the ultimate prize in Meath football. Summerhill had beaten Seneschalstown in the final at Kells and were crowned Senior Football Championship winners for the first time in nine years and the fifth time in all. By Paul Clarke.
2005
Glory days to return?
After unprecedented success at minor and U21 levels in recent years, Summerhill appear on the cusp of a return to prominence. County Board treasurer Colm Gannon, who figured on the side that took Meath and Leinster by storm in the mid-seventies, is confident that the present crop has something unique to offer. Moreover, he believes that within three years the Keegan Cup will nestle in Summerhill once again and talk of the glory years will finally subside.
2004
Minor and league success
By taking a first MFC in 62 years and adding the ACFL Division 1 title later in the year, Summerhill's future has never looked brighter.
2003
Coming of age
Summerhill captured the 2003 Meath under 21 football championship when defeating Seneschalstown by 0-16 to 1-10 in a thrilling replayed final at Pairc Tailteann on Sunday November 23rd.
2002
October joy
Two Sundays in late October gave Summerhill's supporters plenty to cheer about. First came a victory over Oldcastle that secured the senior team's survival in the top flight and a week later the Junior ‘B' side completed a memorable campaign by winning their particular championship, defeating Walterstown in the final.
2001
Historic underage success
The Summerhill U-16s carved a niche for themselves in the history of the club last July when defeating O'Mahony's to claim the Benny Caffrey cup for the first time ever. Club juvenile chairman and team mentor Mick McGlynn recounts the team's road to glory.
2000
Knockout blows
For the past two years Summerhill have faltered at the quarter-final stage. Jarlath Hughes talks about the need to move on a step.
1999
Nearing the ‘Hill's summit
How a club fared in a year is normally determined by the amount of cups or trophies on display in the trophy cabinet but while silverware may have proved a scarce commodity for Summerhill GFC in 1999, the performance of their teams from minor to junior ‘C' to Reserve League and senior will have provided the club's supporters with the second best thing to success, optimism for the future.
   

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Syddan
2011
Much better from Syddan
Relegation candidates in 2010, Syddan were much improved this year when they came within a whisker of reaching the knockout stages of the IFC. And had it not been for an unfortunate run of injuries, Syddan captain Pauric Young believes they would have been in the shake-up for Mattie McDonnell Cup honours.
2010
Derby win keeps Syddan safe
Since losing the replayed final to Duleek in 2005, Syddan have only managed to reach the closing stages of the Meath IFC once and this year their only cause for celebration was defeating local rivals Castletown in the last round of the group phase to avoid going into the relegation play-offs. By Noel Coogan.
2009
Clear of present danger
Syddan achieved only one victory in the 2009 Intermediate Football Championship, but when it did arrive it was priceless. A decade after they won the title things were so very different as they struggled to avoid a relegation dogfight and steered themselves clear of one with a win over Clann na nGael in their last group game. By Paul Clarke.
2008
Tradition remains strong
After failing to reach the closing stages of the Lagan Group Intermediate Football Championship in each of the previous two years, Syddan did better in the 2008 competition when winning four of their seven outings, drawing one and losing two.
2007
Agonisingly close for Syddan
Syddan went agonisingly close to rejoining the senior ranks in 2005 when they lost the Intermediate Football Championship final to Duleek after a replay and the natural progression appeared to suggest that they would go all the way last year.
2006
A year of memories
After losing the replayed IFC final to Duleek in 2005, Syddan had good reason to be hopeful of rejoining the senior ranks this time round but their hopes were dashed when injuries robbed them of key players for crunch group games. On a happier note memories of their fourth and most recent SFC success were recalled at a function held at the Newtown Country Club in mid-September. By Liam O'Rourke.
2005
Don't look back in anger
Having lost the 2005 Meath intermediate football championship final by one point after a replay, Syddan could be forgiven for looking back on the year with something bordering on contempt. But this is not the case. Veteran attacker Trevor Gilsenan reckons that, despite the obvious disappointment of having been edged out by Duleek at Pairc Tailteann on the second day of October, '05 nonetheless represented a thoroughly decent year for the Green & Gold, who retain a positive outlook going into the new season.
2004
Penalty woe
When Syddan bridged a gap of half a century in late 2003 by winning the Feis Cup they must have started to think that it was really only a matter of time before they would achieve an even greater ambition - that of being a senior club again.
2003
One step away
Syddan have a burning ambition to make it back to the senior ranks, but Navan O'Mahonys frustrated their attempts in 2003 when eliminating the north Meath side at the semi-final stage of the Intermediate Football Championship.
2002
Syddan's Grand Master
Paddy Meegan had a long and distinguished career with club and county. Here he recalls some of the highs and lows.
2001
Mission: Bounce back
Just two years after the jubilation of intermediate championship success, Syddan find themselves back in that grade after relegation from the senior ranks in 2001. But experienced defender Frank McKenna believes the club's familiarity with the middle tier will help them back to the top level at the first time of asking.
2000
Syddan savours senior status
Talked about as relegation candidates at the ouset of the championship, the men from Syddan proved their doubters wrong.
1999
Back in the big time
Fifty years on from their first senior title, Syddan claimed the intermediate crown with a second half come-back that will go down in history. Royal County charts their success.


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Trim
2011
Heffernan quietly confident
Trim hurlers have been quietly making strides in the last couple of years and after last year's semi final appearance, there were hopes that similar progress could be made.
2010
Transition time in Trim
One of the greatest footballers Trim has ever produced performed the dual role of manager and player with the clubÕs senior team in 2010 and while they didnÕt challenge for a place in the knockout stages of the championship, they undoubtedly derived a great deal of pleasure from their victory over Simonstown Gaels in the last round of group matches. By Paul Clarke.
2009
Out of luck
A glance at Trim's results in the 2009 Senior Football Championship suggests that, with any sort of decent luck at all, they might well have reached the knockout stages. But instead they ended up nearer the bottom than the top of their section and well out of contention for a place in the business end of the race for the Keegan Cup.
2008
Early exits for both senior combinations
Trim possess a fervent desire to bridge the gap back to their last Senior Hurling Championship title in 2001, but their thoughts during the majority of this year's campaign weren't of lifting the Jubilee Cup, but of holding onto their status in the premier grade.
2007
Trim hurlers' wait continues
Just like their football counterparts, the Trim hurlers failed to advance from the group stages of the Senior Championship in 2007 because of an inferior score difference and itÕs now a case of looking to next year in the hope of adding a 27th title.
2006
Near and far
ÔThe Keegan Cup is likely to find a home in the shadow of King John's Castle in the not too distant future' it was suggested in an article about Trim in the 2002 Meath GAA Yearbook. They were beaten SFC finalists that year and despite some very promising form since then, the Reds are not any closer to making the big breakthrough.
2005
Trim keep on knocking
For the third successive year, Trim fell at the penultimate hurdle in the Meath Senior Football Championship in 2005. After Simonstown Gaels twice ended their dreams of glory, last September the Reds were well beaten by Blackhall Gaels and the gap going back to their only Keegan Cup triumph in 1962 gets wider. By Noel Coogan.
2004
The darkest hour is the one before dawn
Trim's heavy defeat by Simonstown in the SFC semi-final underlines the difficulties faced by dual clubs who reach the business end of championships in both codes, claims club secretary Fergal Flanagan.
2003
Caught on the hop
When Trim reached the Meath SFC final in 2002 they had an extra incentive to lift the title as that year marked the 40th anniversary of their only outright success in the championship.
2002
A good year
The dream of winning a first Senior Football Championship in 40 years ended in bitter disappointment for Trim, but the 2002 campaign suggested that the Keegan Cup is likely to find a home in the shadow of King John's Castle in the not too distant future.
2001
Jubilation for Trim
In a year in which the GAA introduced a ‘back door' All-Ireland football championship for the first time, Trim stumbled upon a spare key to take the Meath Senior Hurling Championship title for the 26th time.
2000
Marvellous Murray
Trim captain Benny Murray got his hands on the Jubilee Cup this year but would have preferred circumstances to have been a little different.
1999
A Frank insight
Meath selector Frank Foley looks back on a year which was wonderful for the county and disappointing for the club.
   

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Walterstown
2011
BlacksÕ revival continues apace
WalterstownÕs disappointment at losing a second successive SFC quarter-final was tempered by the realisation that they have improved beyond recognition under Mick OÕBrienÕs guidance in the past two seasons.
2010
Walterstown regain that winning feeling
After winning just one game in the group stages of the Meath SFC in the previous three years, Walterstown, with the clubÕs most successful manager, Mick OÕBrien, back at the helm, showed considerable improvement to reach the last eight where they lost narrowly to Dunboyne. By Noel Coogan.
2009
Dark days for the Blacks
The once-mighty Walterstown have hit upon lean times and in the 2009 Meath Senior Football Championship the Blacks failed to win a game from five outings and were involved in a relegation play-off for the second successive year.
2008
Pride in the black jersey
It was case of dŽjˆ vu for Joey Farrelly and his Walterstown team-mates in 2008 when they became embroiled in the SFC relegation play-off but, just as twelve months previously, they overcame Kilmainhamwood to preserve their senior status and the long serving midfielder predicts better things to come in 2009. By Shane OÕBrien.
2007
A close escape
There was a time when it would be a surprise if Walterstown did not reach the closing stages of the Meath SFC. However, there was a different scenario this year with the Blacks finishing at the bottom of their group and having to win a relegation play-off in order to avoid the drop to intermediate ranks.
2006
Able and ready
Anybody who watched Walterstown concede four goals and go down heavily to reigning champions Dunboyne in their opening Senior Football Championship match couldn't possibly have predicted the manner in which they would recover to win their remaining six divisional games and finish on top of the pile.
2005
50/50 for Walterstown and John
Walterstown's 2005 SFC form was hit and miss. From their seven group outings, they won three, lost three and drew one Ð a precise 50% record. It wasn't enough to book a place in the business end of the Keegan Cup competition, however, much to the obvious disappointment of powerful midfielder John Davis.
2004
Solid foundation
This time two decades ago Walterstown were looking back on a third successive Meath Senior Football Championship title and a fifth in seven years. They may not be at that level right now but the foundations are in place to make a surge in the near future.
2003
A league of their own
While Walterstown once again suffered disappointment in the Meath SFC, there was some consolation in the annexation of the All County Division 1 League title for the first time, with a dramatic final victory over holders Dunshaughlin.
2002
Daylight robbery
Walterstown's dream of winning a first Senior Football Championship in 18 years was alive and very well 12 minutes into the second half of their quarter-final against Trim at Dunsany. They led by eight points and were playing high quality football despite kicking 10 wides.
2001
Progress for the Blacks
Amazingly it is nearly 20 years since Walterstown last brought the coveted Keegan Cup out the road to Johnstown. But through 2001 a young Blacks selection continually placed down markers to say further glory days lay ahead.
2000
Let the good times roll ...
With the amount of residential developments being currently erected in Johnstown and its surrounding environs, Walterstown supporters are rubbing their hands at the thoughts of the benefits the club should derive from the increase in numbers. Walterstown secretary Sean O'Brien reveals that plans are in place to maximise the potential which the population increase should provide.
1999
The Walterstown School of Coaching
Former Walterstown players appear to be a popular choice amongst clubs throughout the county when it comes to selecting the coach for the coming year. Some have even enjoyed success on the intercounty front. Royal County profiles the men who graduated from the Walterstown school of coaching.
   

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Wolfe Tones
2011
McLoughlin ready for new challenge
The Wolfe Tones club emerged on the senior stage in 2005 having won back to back junior and intermediate titles. Having consolidated their place in the senior ranks in their first year, the Kilberry/Oristown outfit caused a sensation by lifting the Keegan Cup twelve months later.
2010
Tones hurlers claim junior honours
In a year when the senior footballers of Wolfe Tones fell short in their latest attempt to replicate the Keegan Cup success of 2006, the club still had something to celebrate with the junior hurling team gaining championship glory with a thrilling final victory over Kilskyre.
2009
Marathon run just falls short
As the Wolfe Tones players headed away from Pairc Tailteann on the first Thursday night of November this year it was hardly of any consolation to them that they had played a huge part in two gripping encounters to decide the destination of the Senior Football Championship.
2008
No senior but silverware all the same
Wolfe Tones' hopes of winning the Senior Football Championship for the second time in three years faltered at the semi-final hurdle when Summerhill avenged an earlier group defeat to qualify for their first decider since 1990.
2007
Tones get a rest at last
It is often said that successfully defending a title can be more difficult than winning it in the first place and Wolfe Tones found that out when failing to advance from the group stages of the 2007 Commons Hardware Meath SFC.
2005
Tones comfortable at the top table
They say all good things must come to an end. And while Cormac Reilly's final whistle on September 10th did mark the end of an amazing few years for the GAA folk of Kilberry/Oristown, Brendan Boylan feels that Wolfe Tones proved enough in their first year back in the top flight to suggest that they may not be out of the limelight for very long.
2004
Historic achievement by Wolfe Tones
For those of us who can cast our minds back for a period of 30 years, there is the compelling memory of the day that St. Johns beat St. Vincents to win the intermediate championship.
2003
Hard graft at underage pays dividends
There is an old saying that goes along the lines of ‘long threatening comes at last' and so it was in 2003 from the Wolfe Tones footballers.
2002
Mission accomplished
Wolfe Tones returned to the senior grade at the first time of asking when they overcame a spirited challenge from Kilskyre in the Intermediate Hurling Championship decider at a wind and rain swept Athboy on Sunday October 20. With weather conditions reducing the contest to a lottery, club secretary and centre half back Aidan Jordan was happy to have the winning ticket.
2001
‘Tones enjoy their best ever year
Wolfe Tones came agonisingly close to winning the 2001 Meath JFC. The Oristown/Kilberry/Gibbstown combination went all the way to the county final, only to suffer the disappointment of defeat at the hands of Curraha after a replay. But make no mistake: the Tones will be back. Intermediate football is just around the corner.
2000
‘An Ever present'
Tom Claire arrived in Wilkinstown in the early seventies from his native Ashbourne via Duleek. Since then he has been an integral member of the Wolfe Tones club and is one of their most dedicated clubmen.
1999
Silver Jubilee
GAA President Joe McDonagh helped the members of the Wolfe Tones club celebrate their silver jubilee this year at a function in the Headfort Arms Hotel, Kells on Sunday, 24th October. Royal County takes a look back at an eventful quarter of a century.
1998
 
   

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