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French Football Championship 2018

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With the Annual <> taking place in Paris on Februrary 17th, the hype is really building.
You'll have your usual heavy-lifters in contention, the hosts themselves, the Brittany Boys and Clermont-Ferrand, but I'd give Provence an outside chance this year. They've been burning it up in the South, blowing Azur and Lyon out of the water altogether and word has it they've a few students over from the west of Ireland to add to the fore. That said theyre in a group with the boys from the Capital. Who are people backing?

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 31/01/2018 16:25:47    2072834

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Replying To gerloughnane:  "With the Annual <> taking place in Paris on Februrary 17th, the hype is really building.
You'll have your usual heavy-lifters in contention, the hosts themselves, the Brittany Boys and Clermont-Ferrand, but I'd give Provence an outside chance this year. They've been burning it up in the South, blowing Azur and Lyon out of the water altogether and word has it they've a few students over from the west of Ireland to add to the fore. That said theyre in a group with the boys from the Capital. Who are people backing?"
Always impressed with the standard of gaelic football in France and the dedication of the people running it- they have some youth set-up going in particular. It seems also to be mostly French people involved, with a smattering of Irish expats in the bigger city clubs. Hurling seems to be at a much lower base, though.

Paris Gaels and Rennes seemed to be the best French sides back at the pan-Euros in Maastricht in October (they were the only ones playing senior, and Rennes defeated my club), though it's always hard to gauge it given how few sides from Brittany travel.

I find the first tournament of any season is a bit of a wildcard, as no-one's sure which players have come and gone from a given club.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 02/02/2018 10:31:07    2073319

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Replying To Gleebo:  "
Replying To gerloughnane:  "With the Annual <> taking place in Paris on Februrary 17th, the hype is really building.
You'll have your usual heavy-lifters in contention, the hosts themselves, the Brittany Boys and Clermont-Ferrand, but I'd give Provence an outside chance this year. They've been burning it up in the South, blowing Azur and Lyon out of the water altogether and word has it they've a few students over from the west of Ireland to add to the fore. That said theyre in a group with the boys from the Capital. Who are people backing?"
Always impressed with the standard of gaelic football in France and the dedication of the people running it- they have some youth set-up going in particular. It seems also to be mostly French people involved, with a smattering of Irish expats in the bigger city clubs. Hurling seems to be at a much lower base, though.

Paris Gaels and Rennes seemed to be the best French sides back at the pan-Euros in Maastricht in October (they were the only ones playing senior, and Rennes defeated my club), though it's always hard to gauge it given how few sides from Brittany travel.

I find the first tournament of any season is a bit of a wildcard, as no-one's sure which players have come and gone from a given club."
If you believe the guff the GAA are trying to spread to the people of Ireland about the success of the french championship then you're deluded my friend. There are a number of people across France working hard to ensure that the competition is preserved but the negligence from the European gaa body and the appalling lack of funding for clubs involved is unacceptable. I have it on good authority that most clubs are only receiving around €200 per annum in development funding and we have the extremely unhealthy situation emerging where Paris Gaels are beginning to exert their considerable influence and creating a monopoly over the championship with all the resources they receive. But of course the GAA will ignore this fact so long as they have some golden boys to show off on a youtube or facebook promotional video. The only hope we have for the this year's championship is that one of the emerging teams like Bordeaux or Provence give Paris a run for their money, although they'll have to do so with very few resources behind them.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 06/02/2018 23:10:02    2074699

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If you believe the guff the GAA are trying to spread to the people of Ireland about the success of the french championship then you're deluded my friend. There are a number of people across France working hard to ensure that the competition is preserved but the negligence from the European gaa body and the appalling lack of funding for clubs involved is unacceptable. I have it on good authority that most clubs are only receiving around €200 per annum in development funding and we have the extremely unhealthy situation emerging where Paris Gaels are beginning to exert their considerable influence and creating a monopoly over the championship with all the resources they receive. But of course the GAA will ignore this fact so long as they have some golden boys to show off on a youtube or facebook promotional video. The only hope we have for the this year's championship is that one of the emerging teams like Bordeaux or Provence give Paris a run for their money, although they'll have to do so with very few resources behind them.

A strange reply indeed: where did I mention Gaelic Games Europe or GAA HQ in my previous post? I referred to the local clubs and in particular the French people involved. I have always been impressed with the underage structure in France in particular, as it's something that presents practical obstacles to my own club.

I was involved in running my club (a non-French one) for three years and know the financial (and logistical) challenges involved. For instance, in my region it's not uncommon to have to travel anywhere between five and ten hours by road (one-way) to travel to a football tournament, or to have to fly to hurling tournaments, which mostly take place in Northern cities in continental Europe.

Sustaining a GAA club abroad requires a number of things, most notably a critical mass of people (ideally drawing from both the Irish community and locals), a strong and energetic committee, continuous fundraising initiatives and securing decent facilities and equipment. Granted none of these things are guaranteed, and clubs generally don't get much help from HQ (though a few initiatives have come on-stream in recent years, such as the Goalpost Fund, Global Games Development Programme etc). I too would have issues with some of the bureaucracy that comes from Ireland, which isn't really suitable for international units in my opinion.

I do feel that your slating of GGE is a bit harsh, though: what exactly do you expect from them? They have a very small budget, a small cohort of volunteers and are trying to keep nigh-on 100 clubs happy, which, to put it in perspective, is a bigger spread than in most Irish counties now. I don't personally agree with every decision they make (the disciplinary processes are too modeled on Ireland, IMO), but I always find that many will complain but few people are willing to put their heads above the parapet, as evidenced by the very small number of nominations for MC/CCC/regional CCO posts at the annual convention each year.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 07/02/2018 10:58:26    2074758

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Speaking of guff, where are you getting your info from?

If you believe the guff the GAA are trying to spread to the people of Ireland about the success of the french championship then you're deluded my friend. There are a number of people across France working hard to ensure that the competition is preserved but the negligence from the European gaa body and the appalling lack of funding for clubs involved is unacceptable. I have it on good authority that most clubs are only receiving around €200 per annum in development funding and we have the extremely unhealthy situation emerging where Paris Gaels are beginning to exert their considerable influence and creating a monopoly over the championship with all the resources they receive. But of course the GAA will ignore this fact so long as they have some golden boys to show off on a youtube or facebook promotional video. The only hope we have for the this year's championship is that one of the emerging teams like Bordeaux or Provence give Paris a run for their money, although they'll have to do so with very few resources behind them.

GGE has very limited resources, and any funding that Paris has is self-raised funding. If only there was enough funding to give out to clubs, wouldn't that be mighty. Isn't the case though. You should go along to the annual convention and see for yourself how this pot of gold is divided up.
GGE is dependent on its volunteers, club officers, players, coaches, tutors, referees, GGE officers, and all being done on a Budget of <€10 per member.

Kickitwillya (Cavan) - Posts: 2 - 09/02/2018 08:34:58    2075179

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Replying To CyrilDonnellan8:  "
Replying To Gleebo:  "[quote=gerloughnane:  "With the Annual <> taking place in Paris on Februrary 17th, the hype is really building.
You'll have your usual heavy-lifters in contention, the hosts themselves, the Brittany Boys and Clermont-Ferrand, but I'd give Provence an outside chance this year. They've been burning it up in the South, blowing Azur and Lyon out of the water altogether and word has it they've a few students over from the west of Ireland to add to the fore. That said theyre in a group with the boys from the Capital. Who are people backing?"
Always impressed with the standard of gaelic football in France and the dedication of the people running it- they have some youth set-up going in particular. It seems also to be mostly French people involved, with a smattering of Irish expats in the bigger city clubs. Hurling seems to be at a much lower base, though.

Paris Gaels and Rennes seemed to be the best French sides back at the pan-Euros in Maastricht in October (they were the only ones playing senior, and Rennes defeated my club), though it's always hard to gauge it given how few sides from Brittany travel.

I find the first tournament of any season is a bit of a wildcard, as no-one's sure which players have come and gone from a given club."
If you believe the guff the GAA are trying to spread to the people of Ireland about the success of the french championship then you're deluded my friend. There are a number of people across France working hard to ensure that the competition is preserved but the negligence from the European gaa body and the appalling lack of funding for clubs involved is unacceptable. I have it on good authority that most clubs are only receiving around €200 per annum in development funding and we have the extremely unhealthy situation emerging where Paris Gaels are beginning to exert their considerable influence and creating a monopoly over the championship with all the resources they receive. But of course the GAA will ignore this fact so long as they have some golden boys to show off on a youtube or facebook promotional video. The only hope we have for the this year's championship is that one of the emerging teams like Bordeaux or Provence give Paris a run for their money, although they'll have to do so with very few resources behind them."]Can't beat some good old fashoned Irish begrudgery!!!!

Where would we be without it

witnof (Dublin) - Posts: 1363 - 09/02/2018 13:38:29    2075239

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Can't beat some good old fashoned Irish begrudgery!!!!

Where would we be without it


You wouldn't believe some of the fallings out that happen over such things, or the perception of said things. I could easily write a GAA soap opera based on things I've seen and heard in my time! Only problem would be that half of it isn't believable.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 09/02/2018 14:13:42    2075245

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Lads I think we're getting way ahead of ourselves here and missing the real point. First and Foremost, we must get Football up and running and improve the quality of players, French and Ex-Pats, Refs and Pitches abroad to a reasonable quality before we start thinking of MC, CCC, CCO and the likes. At the moment it's in the homeland that the CCC etc. have to wake up and smell the coffee. then worry about themselves on the Continent. This weekend in the Capital we'll see posts duck-taped to Soccer Nets, Refs unsure of the rules (nevermind the players), jerseys from the 80s and unpumped footballs. Funding is the issue. HQ are great for a social media post of a tournements puts time they put their hands in their deep pockets and invest overseas if they want to see any improvement in the game on the Continent.

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 13/02/2018 15:02:47    2076558

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I would suggest that regional CCO's etc. are important in setting standards on some of the things you mention, especially pitches, nets, goalposts etc. Footballs are a bit of a bugbear of mine, as there would be no need to use training balls at tournaments if clubs didn't slope off with each others' match balls!

IMO GAA HQ doesn't really care about international gaelic games other than:

1. When there's the possibility of a junket involved;

2. When they can get GAA players to fly in for the World Games in Dublin, potentially earning out of it;

3. When fees are due from international clubs.

IMHO Clubs have to be imaginative to get their fundraising in order, because they will die a death waiting for HQ to do it for them. There are GAA/DFAT games development grant schemes, goalpost grants etc. for international clubs out there, but afaik they are funded by the Irish Government rather than the GAA themselves.

My club spend a lot of time fundraising, as there are large distances to be covered playing GAA in Europe, usually necessitating a night or two in a hostel, there are training fees to be covered, floodlights, gear and equipment costs, not to mention the massive fees to be paid to the GAA/LGFA/ Camogie Association every year, tournament fees and pitch rental etc. Its a lot of work, but it's far from insurmountable if you have a strong committee and are alive to the opportunities out there, recruitment and sponsorship alike.

In fairness, in my experience with Gaelic Games Europe, they've usually been supportive of clubs trying to get funding via one route or another, provided that you have a sound plan and you're an active club. My club started hurling a few years' back and they helped with equipment costs, for example.

They don't always get things right IMO ( the disciplinary system in particular being a major issue) but given the growth in European GAA over the past decade or so, they're never going to be able to please everybody. In particular, I would suggest that it's unrealistic to expect the level of funding mentioned earlier in the thread, as that would require a massive windfall that just isn't there at the moment.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 13/02/2018 16:43:52    2076582

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Replying To gerloughnane:  "Lads I think we're getting way ahead of ourselves here and missing the real point. First and Foremost, we must get Football up and running and improve the quality of players, French and Ex-Pats, Refs and Pitches abroad to a reasonable quality before we start thinking of MC, CCC, CCO and the likes. At the moment it's in the homeland that the CCC etc. have to wake up and smell the coffee. then worry about themselves on the Continent. This weekend in the Capital we'll see posts duck-taped to Soccer Nets, Refs unsure of the rules (nevermind the players), jerseys from the 80s and unpumped footballs. Funding is the issue. HQ are great for a social media post of a tournements puts time they put their hands in their deep pockets and invest overseas if they want to see any improvement in the game on the Continent."
Yep. It's all about the games. If they aren't run well and aren't attractive, then forget thinking about growth. Way too much energy put in to ramming rules down peoples throats and not enough in to improving the games.
That goes for in Europe as well as in Ireland.

Kickitwillya (Cavan) - Posts: 2 - 14/02/2018 08:45:26    2076685

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Replying To Kickitwillya:  "Yep. It's all about the games. If they aren't run well and aren't attractive, then forget thinking about growth. Way too much energy put in to ramming rules down peoples throats and not enough in to improving the games.
That goes for in Europe as well as in Ireland."
Yeah, the games should take precedence, that's what players want: games, games and more games! It's also what we lack in the GAA relative to our competitors, be it rugby, basketball, soccer or whatever. People get fed up if they're waiting for weeks or months for a match and inevitably end up in one of the other sports, which have much more predictable fixture calendars.

IMO there's also too much beggar-thy-neighbour stuff in Euro GAA, with some clubs seemingly nursing long term grudges against their neighbours for whatever reason. That might fly in Ireland where you have 2000+ clubs, but in an environment where you may have to go to another country to find the next club, it makes no sense.

Expansion of the games helps us all, giving us more fixtures, more tournaments, more days out, more post-tournament shenanigans ;)

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 14/02/2018 13:23:35    2076782

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Well wrapping up the first weekend of championship football in France it's fair to say the smart money is still on Paris but they have a few viable contenders in Provence and Clermont, as well as Liffré from Brittany who are looking strong as usual. You couldn't count out Bordeaux as challengers either and we'll have a better idea of where they're at after this weekends action on their home turf.
Looking back at last weekend's action it appears as though there might not be as much of a gap between Paris and the rest as one might have thought, despite the obvious advantages they have in terms of players pools, facilities and funding. Clermont put it up to them at stages and Provence gave them a good scare in the semi-final when their late rally fell just short. Brannigan showed shades of his MVP form from last year, meaning teams will have to devise smart gameplans to counteract his scoring prowess. Clermont and Provence turned into a derby almost seemingly in an instant over the course of their two matches with plenty of massive hits and bruising physicality on display, something that's much needed in this championship. In the end Provence had the last laugh as their combination of skill and power was too much for Clermont and they clinched third place behind the two Paris teams. Clermont at times seemed more interested in starting melees than playing football, and their style was somewhat reminiscent of Tyrone at their worst.
An interesting weekend ahead, hopefully it'll be as competitive as the last.

CyrilDonnellan8 (Galway) - Posts: 12 - 20/02/2018 10:31:06    2078662

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Nice summary there, thanks for providing it.

How does the the French championship work given that Brittany and the rest of the country have separate leagues? Is there a playoff to decide the overall champion? 11 or 15 a side?

Good to see the first championship action of the year, we're still slogging through a foot of snow at the moment ;)

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 20/02/2018 11:29:11    2078678

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Replying To CyrilDonnellan8:  "Well wrapping up the first weekend of championship football in France it's fair to say the smart money is still on Paris but they have a few viable contenders in Provence and Clermont, as well as Liffré from Brittany who are looking strong as usual. You couldn't count out Bordeaux as challengers either and we'll have a better idea of where they're at after this weekends action on their home turf.
Looking back at last weekend's action it appears as though there might not be as much of a gap between Paris and the rest as one might have thought, despite the obvious advantages they have in terms of players pools, facilities and funding. Clermont put it up to them at stages and Provence gave them a good scare in the semi-final when their late rally fell just short. Brannigan showed shades of his MVP form from last year, meaning teams will have to devise smart gameplans to counteract his scoring prowess. Clermont and Provence turned into a derby almost seemingly in an instant over the course of their two matches with plenty of massive hits and bruising physicality on display, something that's much needed in this championship. In the end Provence had the last laugh as their combination of skill and power was too much for Clermont and they clinched third place behind the two Paris teams. Clermont at times seemed more interested in starting melees than playing football, and their style was somewhat reminiscent of Tyrone at their worst.
An interesting weekend ahead, hopefully it'll be as competitive as the last."
I was there too and have to say it was a brilliant tournament organised by Paris Gaels, who were very welcoming, and clearly put a lot of work into its' organisation.
I might add that I think you're being a bit hard on Clermont there, up against a Provence team with a number of Irish lads who are comfortable on the ball and an easy on the eye playing style, they obviously felt that this was their best way of matching them. I missed a bit of the semi-final but it seems as though the class of the Provence lads shone through.
Paris have a very good squad depth and will be hard to match, but as you said the gap seems to be closer than the media would portray.

ImpossibleAngle (Galway) - Posts: 5 - 20/02/2018 12:04:33    2078696

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Replying To CyrilDonnellan8:  "Well wrapping up the first weekend of championship football in France it's fair to say the smart money is still on Paris but they have a few viable contenders in Provence and Clermont, as well as Liffré from Brittany who are looking strong as usual. You couldn't count out Bordeaux as challengers either and we'll have a better idea of where they're at after this weekends action on their home turf.
Looking back at last weekend's action it appears as though there might not be as much of a gap between Paris and the rest as one might have thought, despite the obvious advantages they have in terms of players pools, facilities and funding. Clermont put it up to them at stages and Provence gave them a good scare in the semi-final when their late rally fell just short. Brannigan showed shades of his MVP form from last year, meaning teams will have to devise smart gameplans to counteract his scoring prowess. Clermont and Provence turned into a derby almost seemingly in an instant over the course of their two matches with plenty of massive hits and bruising physicality on display, something that's much needed in this championship. In the end Provence had the last laugh as their combination of skill and power was too much for Clermont and they clinched third place behind the two Paris teams. Clermont at times seemed more interested in starting melees than playing football, and their style was somewhat reminiscent of Tyrone at their worst.
An interesting weekend ahead, hopefully it'll be as competitive as the last."
Referring to Clermont as 'Tyrone at their worst' is outrageous and downright wrong and unfair. This shouldn't have been approved by admin. Yes it's true that they play with a physical edge to their game but is'nt that what we want to see from the French Championship? Rather than refs blowing for this, that and the other. Provence were well able to match them in that regard particularly in 3rd place play off. To say they "seemed more interested in starting melees than playing football" is unfair to Clermont. It was a physical encounter but as regards the few instances of 'handbags' or so to speak, it takes two to tango and Provence deserve equal blame. It seems a bit of rivalry is breaking out among the teams but there's nothing wrong with a healthy rivalty, in fact it's somthing European football is lacking.

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 20/02/2018 15:14:20    2078757

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Replying To ImpossibleAngle:  "I was there too and have to say it was a brilliant tournament organised by Paris Gaels, who were very welcoming, and clearly put a lot of work into its' organisation.
I might add that I think you're being a bit hard on Clermont there, up against a Provence team with a number of Irish lads who are comfortable on the ball and an easy on the eye playing style, they obviously felt that this was their best way of matching them. I missed a bit of the semi-final but it seems as though the class of the Provence lads shone through.
Paris have a very good squad depth and will be hard to match, but as you said the gap seems to be closer than the media would portray."
I'd have to agree with you there @impossibleangle. Clermont are strong and physical but that's nothing new. Overall I was very impressed with Provence. Team playing lovely stylish football, clearly some young Irish blood there. Most definitely a bright future for the club. If anyone is to topple the Capital in the next few years it's them. Clermont beat them in the group with nothing to spare and Paris A knocked them out in the semis by 3 but they bounced back and beat Clermont for 3rd place. Paris A and B in the Final but to be fair all the challengers were up against it from day one. When Paris have been around for 20+ years, have such a pick of players and the extra funding they get to back it all. It's time for change in European football. All teams are at an immediate disadvantage when majority of funding stays wihtin the capitals.

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 20/02/2018 15:33:49    2078762

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It's time for change in European football. All teams are at an immediate disadvantage when majority of funding stays wihtin the capitals.

Where are you getting this idea from? My club's based in a capital city and I'd only love for us to have some of this bottomless funding that seems to be theoretically out there ;) I know of several other clubs like us where all or almost all of their budget comes from internal sources such as membership fees and fundraising.

Chances are that capital city teams are better funded as they have higher playing populations, easier access to Irish networks, greater options for sponsorship. Mind you, pitch rental etc. will probably also be more costly for them.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 20/02/2018 16:08:14    2078774

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Replying To Gleebo:  "It's time for change in European football. All teams are at an immediate disadvantage when majority of funding stays wihtin the capitals.

Where are you getting this idea from? My club's based in a capital city and I'd only love for us to have some of this bottomless funding that seems to be theoretically out there ;) I know of several other clubs like us where all or almost all of their budget comes from internal sources such as membership fees and fundraising.

Chances are that capital city teams are better funded as they have higher playing populations, easier access to Irish networks, greater options for sponsorship. Mind you, pitch rental etc. will probably also be more costly for them."
Your not getting my point @Gleebo, yes facilities are more expensive to rent and a wider spread of players etc but can't dodge the matter because be it due to funding pro rata per player or otherwise, across the Continent particularly the smaller nations the Capitals are dominating. I too am part of a Capital and without competition the smaller cities are losing hope and motivation if they can't compete. Something must be done to create competitive Championships abroad and unfortuantely like all else in the world, it's down to money.

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 06/03/2018 13:59:46    2082203

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Another great weekend of Football in Bordeaux last weekend, the 2nd Minor Seeding tournanet of 2018 and it's safe to say this years Championship is looking like the most competitve for a while with contenders coming from all sides. Bordeaux A took the silverware and are looking sharp as ever. However Toulouse and Niort are showing a lot of potential and if they hit full form and peak at the right time they could be right up there in Melting pot come June. The Kiwi Mike Lawson of Tolosa Gaels was given MVP. His Rugby background really showed when he brought the physical edge over others and anchored the game playing as a deep midfielder and acted as a playmaker throughout. Angers and Azur have a bit of ground to make up on the points table but there is plenty of time yet and anything can happen come Championship especially considering lads and ex pats coming and going in Summer Months.
Next up is Provence home tournament with Bordeaux A & B, Niort and Azur. Boardeaux favourites going by both Tradition and Form ( as of last week) but Provence will have a full pick and their home turf, do ye reckon they could edge it? Can't rule of Niort either, they looked sharp as always on the Garonne last week and were missing a few regulars or so I heard. Bordeaux B and Azur will more than likely battle it out at the bottom, avoiding the 'runt' title would be important for Azur, a David & Goliath battle last week, thoughts their lads?

gerloughnane (Galway) - Posts: 20 - 06/03/2018 15:42:46    2082229

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Replying To gerloughnane:  "
Replying To Gleebo:  "It's time for change in European football. All teams are at an immediate disadvantage when majority of funding stays wihtin the capitals.

Where are you getting this idea from? My club's based in a capital city and I'd only love for us to have some of this bottomless funding that seems to be theoretically out there ;) I know of several other clubs like us where all or almost all of their budget comes from internal sources such as membership fees and fundraising.

Chances are that capital city teams are better funded as they have higher playing populations, easier access to Irish networks, greater options for sponsorship. Mind you, pitch rental etc. will probably also be more costly for them."
Your not getting my point @Gleebo, yes facilities are more expensive to rent and a wider spread of players etc but can't dodge the matter because be it due to funding pro rata per player or otherwise, across the Continent particularly the smaller nations the Capitals are dominating. I too am part of a Capital and without competition the smaller cities are losing hope and motivation if they can't compete. Something must be done to create competitive Championships abroad and unfortuantely like all else in the world, it's down to money."
Well, I guess we're going to have to agree to disagree, then.

GGE gets €8 per player registered every year to fund all of its activities, be it coaching sessions, referee training sessions, organizing tournaments, the yearly convention, sending representative teams to the World Games, club set-up grants etc. That is not a lot of bread to redistribute across 100 clubs in the way you seem to be suggesting.

To put it in context: friends of mine who played for Europe in the World Games two years back had to crowdfund to meet their costs, while fellas from regions like the Middle East, Australia etc. were subsidised by their county boards (and rightfully so, given the travelling etc. involved). It's no-one's fault, it's just that Europe is so integrated that it's much more difficult to get business sponsors on board than somewhere that's relatively untapped for Irish business. The Pan-Asian Games, for example, are sponsored by Fexco, Middle East GAA is sponsored by Etihad. The Pan-Euros just got their first sponsor last year, but it's safe to say that there's a huge disparity there.

Likewise, some regions/ cities of Europe are more prosperous than others. There are sources of funding out there (that I mentioned earlier) that can be used for club development if people put their thinking caps on.

It seems to me that if things in France are as uncompetitive as you're suggesting, then it's more a question of structures changing to reflect the gaps, rather than finances alone. Benelux have championship and shield structures, for example, which is needed as there would be huge gaps in playing resources between the top clubs and some of the newer ones from smaller cities.

Gleebo (Mayo) - Posts: 1527 - 06/03/2018 17:15:29    2082261

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