National Forum

Shinty International

(Oldest Posts First) - Go To The Latest Post

With the Shinty on this weekend im interested to see what people's opinions are on it, and if people bother watching it?
Personally I will watch it but I think there are far more differences than similarities between the two codes. That said its great for players from non traditional hurling counties to get recognition. As have some of my own clubmen over the past few years.

Bon (Kildare) - 18/10/2017 23:34:43    2056127

Link

Can anyone explain how the team is selected? There seems to be a few top tier players but the bulk of them are from second tier counties.

liam500 (Wicklow) - 19/10/2017 00:31:22    2056132

Link

Replying To Bon:  "With the Shinty on this weekend im interested to see what people's opinions are on it, and if people bother watching it?
Personally I will watch it but I think there are far more differences than similarities between the two codes. That said its great for players from non traditional hurling counties to get recognition. As have some of my own clubmen over the past few years."
Shinty was brought to Scotland by the Gaels. Plenty of similarities to hurling.

keeper7 (Longford) - 19/10/2017 02:25:54    2056136

Link

Replying To liam500:  "Can anyone explain how the team is selected? There seems to be a few top tier players but the bulk of them are from second tier counties."
There's a selection process for the "second tier counties". The first tier lads are hand-picked based on who's available, I reckon.

keeper7 (Longford) - 19/10/2017 02:27:55    2056137

Link

Replying To liam500:  "Can anyone explain how the team is selected? There seems to be a few top tier players but the bulk of them are from second tier counties."
Shinty is played by a select few in the highlands in Scotland, no where near the level of hurling here. If we picked a full Irish team from top tier Liam McCarthy counties, we'd thrash them every year. There would be no competition. Think the decision was made a number of years ago, that the panels would be mostly drawn from weaker tier counties, with only a few top tier players to supplement.

Loughduff Lad (Cavan) - 19/10/2017 08:17:55    2056144

Link

played it few times, very similar to each other, really enjoyable, love watching it.

Shinty and commons(camanach) which was played in Ulster mainly are very similar

christy sting (Derry) - 19/10/2017 10:36:34    2056160

Link

I saw it in Croke Park in 2006, prior to the Aussie dust-up. It's interesting to watch, but I couldn't quite shake the sense that you're watching two teams playing very different games on the same pitch. The shinty stick is like a hockey stick, narrow and long, and when they pull on the ball, they swing almost like a golfer would. For that reason, you can see the Irish lads fighting the instinct to get in close to block as they would in hurling.

Also, you're not allowed to catch the ball in the compromise game, which makes it a bit tougher for the Irish fellas. Mind you, the shinty goalies have terrible difficulty with any ball that goes in high, as the bos on their stick is very narrow.

All in all a bit of a weird one.

Gleebo (Mayo) - 19/10/2017 15:03:52    2056239

Link

Makes more sense than the International Rules in my opinion. Been to the one in Croker and watch on the telly, quite enjoy it.

witnof (Dublin) - 19/10/2017 15:26:43    2056248

Link

I really like it. i like the fact that our lads have to play without using their hands to touch the ball or to hold their opponents. As they can't catch the ball, we see some overhead pulling and some ground hurling which is refreshing these days. I would not mind seeing the same rules applied to the national league for a trial.

bennybunny (Cork) - 19/10/2017 15:49:59    2056255

Link

Hey guys,
I have to say I love this game. A cross between hockey and hurdling and maybe a game the people in the north could play too as I know hockey is very poplar there and which can lead them into hurdling indirectly. Anything that gets more playing the game i am all for.

Dee (Laois) - 19/10/2017 17:06:08    2056286

Link

Replying To christy sting:  "played it few times, very similar to each other, really enjoyable, love watching it.

Shinty and commons(camanach) which was played in Ulster mainly are very similar"
The Gael from Ulster brought hurling/shinty to Scotland.

keeper7 (Longford) - 19/10/2017 17:48:18    2056302

Link

Replying To christy sting:  "played it few times, very similar to each other, really enjoyable, love watching it.

Shinty and commons(camanach) which was played in Ulster mainly are very similar"
My Grandfather who never left Dublin referred to hurling as "commons" or "playing commons" always.

I think it may have been the word in use here as well as in the north as I've seen some mentions of it in a Dublin context going way back as well.

MesAmis (Dublin) - 19/10/2017 18:05:02    2056308

Link

Replying To MesAmis:  "My Grandfather who never left Dublin referred to hurling as "commons" or "playing commons" always.

I think it may have been the word in use here as well as in the north as I've seen some mentions of it in a Dublin context going way back as well."
You are right Commons was played in part of Dublin in the 18th/19th century and was of Northern origin. I think this article explains a lot about the two styles and the geography/history associated with both.
http://www.historyireland.com/18th-19th-century-history/the-geography-of-hurling-11-2/

arock (Dublin) - 19/10/2017 20:23:39    2056342

Link

I'LLC watch it if I can find a way to here in the states. I enjoy the combo game much more than the "other" forms of Hurling : 7's, 11's. Watching that nonsense they played in Boston 2 years ago made me glad I didn't go. Shinty/Hurling combo is entertaining and it's nice to root for the country as opposed to county. Also nice to see the talent from other counties that I miss out on being in the states.

Yank_inyerchain (USA) - 21/10/2017 13:45:01    2056791

Link

Good contest. Éire having a better 2nd half.
Some great stickwork from our boys but the Albanaigh look more likely to get the goals.

Suas Sios (None) - 21/10/2017 15:24:25    2056816

Link

The hand-on-the-back rule ridiculously strictly enforced when wild pulls & chops were not blown for. Scotland get 2 points for a placed ball score over-the-bar. This is the main reason we lost today. Why don't Ireland take our scoreable frees the same as a sideline cut???

keeper7 (Longford) - 21/10/2017 16:25:06    2056828

Link

Replying To Yank_inyerchain:  "I'LLC watch it if I can find a way to here in the states. I enjoy the combo game much more than the "other" forms of Hurling : 7's, 11's. Watching that nonsense they played in Boston 2 years ago made me glad I didn't go. Shinty/Hurling combo is entertaining and it's nice to root for the country as opposed to county. Also nice to see the talent from other counties that I miss out on being in the states."
Awful stuff and highly dangerous for the hurlers.

neverright (Roscommon) - 21/10/2017 17:15:25    2056837

Link

Replying To neverright:  "Awful stuff and highly dangerous for the hurlers."
I didn't notice any injuries today.

keeper7 (Longford) - 21/10/2017 18:10:03    2056847

Link

Scottish ref gave a lot of soft frees for sure. I thought they only got 2 for sideline efforts? The commentary did mention something about how useful Joe Canning would have been to pick up those 2 pointers.

Their goalie made a wonder save late on which might have spurred the Irish on to victory. Wides probably cost us in the end.

Suas Sios (None) - 21/10/2017 18:12:27    2056848

Link

One word for this sport, and the compromise, why?

realdub (Dublin) - 21/10/2017 18:37:58    2056854

Link