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Alan Brogan, mature attitude to alcohol.

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Fair play to Alan Brogan for writing this. I think we need more role models from sport, musicians, writers, actors etc talking about responsible attitudes towards alcohol. It's possible to enjoy some sociable drinks rather than going out to get drunk. Unfortunately I think the attitude amongst many of our youth is still that you have to get drunk to have a good time. Unfortunately I don't think this article will change many attitudes but it's a good start.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 09:03:13    2034994

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Near impossible unfortunately to change our attitude to drink in this country.
It's almost in our DNA at this stage. Only when it becomes part of our education system and we see role models showing the way along with replacements for sponsorship will there be any chance of progress.If anything it seems to be getting worse though unfortunately.
Drink and gambling are scourges to a lot of people and have destroyed too many lives.

catch22 (USA) - 18/08/2017 09:34:36    2035001

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Don't think you can blame young people as they grow up watching their parents and there generations use alcohol as the only way to celebrate or it has to be central to any occasion so what do you expect them to do when they hit 18 themselves it's already ingrained in their mindset by then that it's the exceptable thing to do. I don't drink and doesn't stop me enjoying myself at all these occasions I just don't need it to let loose when people realise that it will make it easier for them not to think you need alcohol to enjoy anything

hill16no1man (Dublin) - 18/08/2017 09:58:47    2035010

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In terms of the GAA, a mature attitude to alcohol would be to get rid of these stupid and unnecessary drink bans and let any players who want to, enjoy a few (few) social drinks after a match. What harm does 4 or 5 pints do to any player if there next game isn't for another 2-3 weeks? These guys are amateurs, they put aside so much of their life to play on a county team, denying them a regular chance to socially bond with their team mates and release stress is madness.

Surely any sports psychologist worth his salt would wax on about the benefits of team bonding. To me these drink bans are another tool of the charlatan GAA managers who infect the game. They're so insecure of their own ability to manage that they have to go to extremes like this just to be seen to be 'taking charge'. In this day and age, how many serious GAA players would risk their careers by going off on benders before upcoming matches? Young people, and that's what most of our players are, need to be treated with maturity and allowed the freedom to act for themselves.

On a broader note, as someone who spends a lot of time among 17-22 year olds, I do think a lot of today's generation are much more aware of the dangers of excessive binge drinking and on night's out they do tend to take care of themselves more.

I wouldn't be that old (early 30s), but when I think back to when I was 17 or 18 and I do believe teenagers and young adults today are much more savvy. I was only remember this week as the LC results came out, how I 'celebrated' that night - Pissed drunk and ending up throwing up and crawling around a street in Tralee only to have a girl I was chasing all summer come across me in that state, needless to say I never got a date!

TheHermit (Kerry) - 18/08/2017 10:09:27    2035012

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Replying To catch22:  "Near impossible unfortunately to change our attitude to drink in this country.
It's almost in our DNA at this stage. Only when it becomes part of our education system and we see role models showing the way along with replacements for sponsorship will there be any chance of progress.If anything it seems to be getting worse though unfortunately.
Drink and gambling are scourges to a lot of people and have destroyed too many lives."
Glad you mentioned gambling as that's the one that often gets ignored. Especially these days when it's so easy for people to be lured into the honey trap by the online companies. Tap Tap Boom and all that rubbish. Carrot of a few free bets and a lot of people are suckered.

MedwayIrish (Wexford) - 18/08/2017 10:13:30    2035015

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Replying To TheHermit:  "In terms of the GAA, a mature attitude to alcohol would be to get rid of these stupid and unnecessary drink bans and let any players who want to, enjoy a few (few) social drinks after a match. What harm does 4 or 5 pints do to any player if there next game isn't for another 2-3 weeks? These guys are amateurs, they put aside so much of their life to play on a county team, denying them a regular chance to socially bond with their team mates and release stress is madness.

Surely any sports psychologist worth his salt would wax on about the benefits of team bonding. To me these drink bans are another tool of the charlatan GAA managers who infect the game. They're so insecure of their own ability to manage that they have to go to extremes like this just to be seen to be 'taking charge'. In this day and age, how many serious GAA players would risk their careers by going off on benders before upcoming matches? Young people, and that's what most of our players are, need to be treated with maturity and allowed the freedom to act for themselves.

On a broader note, as someone who spends a lot of time among 17-22 year olds, I do think a lot of today's generation are much more aware of the dangers of excessive binge drinking and on night's out they do tend to take care of themselves more.

I wouldn't be that old (early 30s), but when I think back to when I was 17 or 18 and I do believe teenagers and young adults today are much more savvy. I was only remember this week as the LC results came out, how I 'celebrated' that night - Pissed drunk and ending up throwing up and crawling around a street in Tralee only to have a girl I was chasing all summer come across me in that state, needless to say I never got a date!"
I agree with some of what you say. The "kids" (Jesus I am only 30 but feel old) who done their leaving cert recently do seem more mature. However I am talking about those who are involved in GAA. I think sport has a great grounding effect on young people, they are healthier and much more mature. What is worse now days is young people engaging in hard drugs.....I have seen it and it's something that was not done when I was that age.

yew_tree (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 10:37:21    2035022

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Good to see a high profile player speak out.

Laois76 (Laois) - 18/08/2017 10:37:30    2035023

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Replying To hill16no1man:  "Don't think you can blame young people as they grow up watching their parents and there generations use alcohol as the only way to celebrate or it has to be central to any occasion so what do you expect them to do when they hit 18 themselves it's already ingrained in their mindset by then that it's the exceptable thing to do. I don't drink and doesn't stop me enjoying myself at all these occasions I just don't need it to let loose when people realise that it will make it easier for them not to think you need alcohol to enjoy anything"
Spot on Hill. I'm not blaming young people at all, just that we need to be starting with our youth if we can ever change attitudes. Difficult for an 18 year old think differently if they were dragged to a pub when they were young to watch Mam and Dad drink. We have sex education in secondary schools but no education on responsible attitudes to drugs and alcohol. I think vintner's association wouldn't be too happy if we did. Proposals like increasing the cost of off-licence alcohol to curb binge drinking make me laugh. Why not find out what motivates people to get drunk in the first place? I'm not anti-drink. Most of us can drink responsibly. My Dad hasn't drank in more than 40 years, a day at a time.

But there's something very wrong with the 'yer man is some man for pints' bravado attitude like a badge of honour. Saying it will never change means it definitely will get only worse.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 11:14:55    2035051

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Have to share this with you lads. Medway Council have recently made Gillingham town centre precinct an "alcohol control zone". They've restricted the cans of beer available to 5.5% and below which is no bad thing BUT how ridiculous is this..........I wandered into one of the mini-markets next to the station for a can for the train journey to London for a gig. The woman behind the counter said "sorry sir, I can't serve you" For a moment I thought I was being ID'd at almost 40! Unfortunately she wasn't flattering my ego and pointed to a notice stating the sale of single cans are now prohibited.

So to conclude, an alcohol control zone where you can't buy a single can, but you're OK to buy anything between 2 and infinity. Great thinking Medway Council, give yourselves a great big pat on the back you utter Fraggles!

MedwayIrish (Wexford) - 18/08/2017 11:45:55    2035063

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A lot of Irish adults and especially our youth are dipsos. They wouldn't be classed as alcoholics but when they do get out for a drink it's drunk or nothing. Traditionally that's what happened in the GAA. Long periods of abstinence followed by an almighty rip of pints when the go ahead was given. Often this led to a day or two even on the cure. Madness really.

I remember having a chat with a Portuguese bar man in Lisbon. I had just given him €50 for a bottle of beer and he got into a fluster with the change. He hadn't enough in the till. I explained to him that if I was going on a proper sesh at home I'd be taking €100 out with me minimum. He could not get over it.

I would agree that attitudes are changing slightly. Maybe in a generation or two we'll be a bit more civilised and can enjoy a few drinks regularly without the need to get drunk.

Lockjaw (Donegal) - 18/08/2017 12:12:40    2035075

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A friend of mine who owns a bar in NYC said once said the Yanks go out for 2/3 beers most nights after work and head on home. Paddy waits until the weekend and goes mad. I couldn't fault what he said.

yew_tree (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 12:30:17    2035080

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Replying To MedwayIrish:  "Glad you mentioned gambling as that's the one that often gets ignored. Especially these days when it's so easy for people to be lured into the honey trap by the online companies. Tap Tap Boom and all that rubbish. Carrot of a few free bets and a lot of people are suckered."
Yep, that's it.
It might take you a while to drink the wages but you could lose the lot in 5 minutes online.

catch22 (USA) - 18/08/2017 13:03:38    2035096

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Booze is a pox on this country.

Drinking heavily is 100% self harm

A purposeful desire to damage yourself and very commonly others too.

It speaks volumes about our mind-set in this country.

Self loathing.

jimbodub (Dublin) - 18/08/2017 15:10:41    2035120

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Replying To jimbodub:  "Booze is a pox on this country.

Drinking heavily is 100% self harm

A purposeful desire to damage yourself and very commonly others too.

It speaks volumes about our mind-set in this country.

Self loathing."
I don't like being drunk but I definitely got into the habit of having a "few" more evenings than not to cope with the end of my marriage and the death of my mum within an 18 month period. I know exactly where you're coming from with the self-loathing, depression and anxiety have been a part of my psyche since early teenhood. Most people wouldn't have the guts to pull the trigger or jump on the live rail but slowly rotting your own liver............easy really.

MedwayIrish (Wexford) - 18/08/2017 15:39:21    2035134

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A friend of mine who owns a bar in NYC said once said the Yanks go out for 2/3 beers most nights after work and head on home. Paddy waits until the weekend and goes mad. I couldn't fault what he said.

yew_tree (Mayo) - Posts:8561 - 18/08/2017


If you're working in an office and doing a regular 9-5 or 9-6 job then it's grand being able to head for a drink or two and meet up with friends in the evening. You''d see it the whole time on the east coast especially, offices empty and people are straight into the nearest pub - 2 hours later and they're pretty much empty again. Miss the rush on the subway and grab a bit of grub, not a bad way to go about things.

But sure what's the point in even drinking if you're only going for 1 or 2...

if_in_doubt (Kildare) - 18/08/2017 15:48:37    2035140

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Change is possible, just look at the decrease in people smoking because it was no longer socially acceptable to smoke. The main issue is that from a young age kids believe that when they are out that in order to be sociable with others they need to drink. It takes years to eliminate that and a lot of people never do. Looking back now I wish at an early age I had learned the ability to enjoy myself without the perceived need of the drink relaxer. I don't believe what Brogan said was in any way inspiring rather the opposite as there was not one twinge of regret and an understanding of what causes the problems - most of us don't play intercounty football for the top teams in the country and the issues are far more common man than the need to go on the lash after six months of being on the dry.

zinny (Wexford) - 18/08/2017 15:50:24    2035141

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I think the attitude has changed a bit in recent years but to much more extremes.
Every now and again at family meet ups, I'll ask my 15 year old nephew and his mates how they get their drink? Do they get someones older brother to buy it for them or do they hang around outside off licenses and ask strangers to get it, are they able to actually stomach drink, is it cheap beer or cider etc
Bear in mind, all these boys go to a predominantly rugby school but a lot of them play gaelic football and hurling too. So being conscious of their fitness (or should I say their six packs), none of them drink beer. They're all too self absorbed with how they look, these are the type of lads that take selfies while drinking protein shakes and posting it on Instagram!! So instead of beer they drink red bull and vodka, less fattening. If anything, that's worse. We all know teenagers will do what teenagers do and they'll get drink someway or another, but to be drinking stuff that's more than twice as strong is surely worse for their liver

keithlemon (Australia) - 18/08/2017 16:09:56    2035149

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Replying To if_in_doubt:  "A friend of mine who owns a bar in NYC said once said the Yanks go out for 2/3 beers most nights after work and head on home. Paddy waits until the weekend and goes mad. I couldn't fault what he said.

yew_tree (Mayo) - Posts:8561 - 18/08/2017


If you're working in an office and doing a regular 9-5 or 9-6 job then it's grand being able to head for a drink or two and meet up with friends in the evening. You''d see it the whole time on the east coast especially, offices empty and people are straight into the nearest pub - 2 hours later and they're pretty much empty again. Miss the rush on the subway and grab a bit of grub, not a bad way to go about things.

But sure what's the point in even drinking if you're only going for 1 or 2..."
Being sociable.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 16:41:52    2035163

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Replying To MedwayIrish:  "I don't like being drunk but I definitely got into the habit of having a "few" more evenings than not to cope with the end of my marriage and the death of my mum within an 18 month period. I know exactly where you're coming from with the self-loathing, depression and anxiety have been a part of my psyche since early teenhood. Most people wouldn't have the guts to pull the trigger or jump on the live rail but slowly rotting your own liver............easy really."
It takes more guts to face up to your problems and do something about it than ending yourself, though.

GreenandRed (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 16:43:42    2035165

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From a rural perspective, I think climate has a huge bearing on Ireland and UK attitude towards drink. Look I love going out myself at the weekend and sometimes over do it. When the evenings start to close in and the days are short, the GAA season is over, your local pub can be the only source of social outlet....or what's left of rural Ireland.

I think alot of drinking is done at home now days. I don't blame people as its cheaper and there is no need to worry about getting home. Problem is there are no measures. I think there are people out there who polish of a bottle of wine at home every second night and are in denial that they have a problem...are they are better then the lad who who goes out on Friday and Saturday night who gets loaded?

yew_tree (Mayo) - 18/08/2017 16:44:43    2035166

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